What item is right for you?
Ask our Experts! 800.606.6969 Live Chat

Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount

You Pay: $2,950.00
Product Highlights
  • Ultra Wide-Angle Lens for Canon EF Mount
  • Excellent Zeiss Optical/Build Quality
  • Superb Chromatic Aberration Correction
  • Unparalleled Prevention of Color Fringes
  • Two Aspheric Lenses Improve Quality
  • Anti-Reflective Coating Cuts Stray Light
  • Integrated Lens Shade Protects Lens
  • Wide Field Angle of 110 Degrees
  • Focuses to Closer Than 10"
  • Manual Focus

The Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount is a precision ultra wide-angle lens built with a Carl Zeiss T* anti-reflection coating that yields images with depth, contrast, and brilliance even under difficult lighting situations. It also delivers photos with contrasting edges, without color fringing. This manual focus ultra wide-angle provides the photographer with a tool that enables dramatic perspectives and creative possibilities. It's useful for landscape photography, interiors and other subjects that require its unique spatial organization. It focuses to 9.84" (24.99 cm).

The 15mm f/2.8 features electronic shutter control and additional electronic contacts to the camera. All existing exposure programs (P, AV, TV, M) and the AF confirmation function of the camera are supported; lens information (focal length and speed) is passed on to the camera. Certain functions that require the use of AF lenses (various scene modes, A-DEP) are partially unavailable. The Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 comes with an EF bayonet (ZE) mount for Canon film and digital full-frame SLRs. It has a M95 x 1.0 size filter thread and a built-in lens shade.

Extraordinary chromatic aberration correction
Prevention of color fringes caused by chromatic aberration almost without exception.
Two aspheric lenses, special types of glass with exceptional partial dispersion and the floating elements design, guarantee high image quality from close-up to infinity.
Anti-reflective coating and the advanced treatment of the lens edges with special dark black lacquers ensure insensitivity to reflections and stray light.
Whether salt crystals or drops of water-its integrated lens shade and standard filter thread afford the front lens optimal protection from wind and weather.
Performance
Focal Length 15mm
Comparable APS-C Focal Length: 24 mm
Aperture Maximum: f/2.8
Minimum: f/22
Camera Mount Type Canon EF
Format Compatibility 35mm Film / Full-Frame Digital Sensor
Canon (APS-C)
Angle of View 110°
Minimum Focus Distance 9.84" (24.99 cm)
Elements/Groups 15/12
Features
Image Stabilization No
Autofocus No
Tripod Collar No
Physical
Dimensions (DxL) Approx. 4.06 x 5.31" (103 x 135 mm)
Weight 28.92 oz (820 g)
Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount
  • Front and Rear Lens Caps
  • 2-Year Warranty
  • REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

    by PowerReviews
    ZeissDistagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount
     
    4.6

    (based on 13 reviews)

    Ratings Distribution

    • 5 Stars

       

      (9)

    • 4 Stars

       

      (3)

    • 3 Stars

       

      (1)

    • 2 Stars

       

      (0)

    • 1 Stars

       

      (0)

    92%

    of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

    Pros

    • Strong construction (11)
    • Consistent output (10)
    • Durable (7)
    • Easily interchangeable (6)
    • Rugged (6)

    Cons

    • Heavy (8)

    Best Uses

    • Landscape/scenery (12)
    • Low light (7)
    • Night photography (5)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Pro photographer (5), Photo enthusiast (4), Semi-pro photographer (4)
      • Was this a gift?:
      • No (12)

    Most Liked Positive Review

     

    Excellent overall...fun to use!

    (4.5 Stars)...I use this lens for travel and landscape photography. I shoot with Canon 1 and 5 series bodies. I also own and use several other "premium" ultra-wide...Read complete review

    (4.5 Stars)...I use this lens for travel and landscape photography. I shoot with Canon 1 and 5 series bodies. I also own and use several other "premium" ultra-wide angle lenses, including Canon's own 14/2.8L-II; 15/2.8; 8-15/4L; 16-35/2.8L-II; 17/4L-TSE; and Zeiss 18/3.5. Predictably, each of these lenses have their own strengths and weaknesses. My impressions after considerable in-field use follow.

    The Zeiss 15/2.8 is very enjoyable to use, and for me, produces excellent, exciting results. I find the manual focus to be considerably more smooth than ANY of the autofocus lenses afore-mentioned, and focusing accuracy is not difficult, using OEM standard Canon focusing screens. I'm able to focus accurately and consistently (although after years of relying perhaps too heavily on autofocus, I'm reminded that manual focusing is a skill, and one which deteriorates with neglect). Nonetheless, for landcape and travel photography, I find the Zeiss 15/2.8 to be VERY SMOOTH AND PRECISE in its manual focusing ability. I don't rely on the accuracy of the focusing distance hash marks on the lens barrel when focusing (I judge focus through the viewfinder and/or with LIVE VIEW, without reference to the distance marks on the lens, so the previous post regarding inaccurate distance markers on the lens is not relevant in my use. If I DO use the fixed distance markers on the lens (as when setting hyperfocal distance, for example), I just note indicated distances WHILE CROSS-REFERENCING ACTUAL IN-FOCUS SETTINGS THROUGH THE VIEWFINDER AND/OR LIVE VIEW, without worrying that the "0.8 meters" indication on the lens barrel might more accurately represent "0.6 meters" in reality. Yes, 0.2 meters can make a huge difference if you're very close to your subject, but again, if you use the viewfinder and/or LIVE VIEW to judge focus, the accuracy of the lens barrel markings become a moot point). By the way, I only use the "green dot" (Canon's "in-focus" indicator in the viewfinder) as a rough guide for finding focus; for greater accuracy, I pay close attention to the details in the viewfinder which I consider to be most important within a given scene, and I gently roll the focusing collar back and forth, with decreasing throw, until subject details are rendered with maximum sharpness. For best precision, of course, use of a tripod and LIVE VIEW - or even just live view mode by itself - with appropriate live view magnification, will result in a very, very sharply focused subject.

    In my use, I find the Zeiss 15/2.8 to be visibly sharper in the center, and DRAMATICALLY SHARPER IN THE CORNERS, than both my Canon 14/2.8L-II and my Canon 16-35/2.8L-II. Vignetting with the Zeiss 15/2.8 is similar (f/2.8~f/4) to the Canon 14/2.8L-II, and about 1-2 stops greater (darker) than the Canon 16-35/2.8L-II wide open. Most noticeable with the Zeiss 15/2.8 is the extremely pleasing color rendition. It's difficult to describe adequately, but it's noticeable and it's quite lovely. Bokeh rendition is also pleasant, though (like most wide/ultra-wide lenses), not "Wow." Flare control is very good - better than any of my Canon ultra-wides, with the exception of the 17/4L-TSE, which is also very good.

    I agree with previous posters who have observed that the Zeiss 15/2.8 is optically superior (in virtually every measure) to any (all) of the Canon ultra-wide lenses, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE EXCELLENT AND EXTREMELY VERSATILE 17/4L-TSE. Obviously, the Canon 17/4L-TSE has the advantage of perspective control, the value of which cannot be underestimated, however, I do find focusing, holding and general handling of the Canon 17/4L-TSE to be less comfortable - and therefore, less enjoyable - than the Zeiss 15/2.8. Mounted on a tripod, and used patiently and with great premeditation, the Canon 17/4L-TSE is superlative; about equal in optical quality to the Zeiss 15/2.8. Of course, the Zeis has a few degrees extra width in its perspective, and again, the color and detail rendering on the Zeiss is uniquely satisfying.

    Clearly, the Zeiss 15/2.8 has some very compelling "pro's"; here are a few "con's" in my opinion: (1) complaints about the front lens cap being too loose and falling off ARE VALID. My biggest hassle with this issue was that in removing the lens from my bag, the cap would invariably "auto-detach" and remain in the bag, having been pulled off as I lifted the lens out. This created an extra step - and extra time - that I had to expend in retrieving the cap from the bottom of the slot in my bag where the lens was stored. Storing the lens inverted in my bag (lens cap facing up) was not a convenient option, as the front element is quite large, which makes it less than ideal as a gripping surface (not to mention the risk of dropping the lens because you've picked it up by the lens cap, which is already too loose!). SOLUTION: I found that carefully and discretely placing a very small stip of black Gaffer's Tape to each side of the built-in metal lens shade on the Zeiss 15/2.8 lens added just enough extra diameter to the lens shade, that the otherwise nice metal lens cap fits quite snugly - easy to remove, but grippy enough to stay on the lens, even when pulling it out of its tightly padded nest in my lens bag! Cheap, easy fix!; (2) the coating on the front element of the Zeiss 15/2.8, though lovely to behold, is quite tacky (sticky), hence, not easy to clean. If you prefer using dry lens tissue to wipe your lenses, you'll find this to be a delicate, difficult task, with lots of torn tissue. Not a major setback, but something to be aware of and prepared for; (3) the lens has no rubber gasket to seal the lens-to-camera mount (unlike most Canon "L" lenses). Again, not a big deal, really, but you WILL notice some tiny ingress of dust and debris if you leave this lens attached to your camera while subjecting it to extensive travel and use; (on the other hand, Canon's thin rubber lens seals are notoriously delicate (they're easy to tear or damage, even when mounting slowly and carefully), so maybe this, too, is a small point?; (4) like all Zeiss ZE lenses, the Zeiss 15/2.8 has the lens-to-camera mounting alignment "red dot" painted ON THE INNER SURFACE (the flat, silver surface where the electronic contacts are), which makes it a bit more difficult to see and use while mounting the lens. Once again, not a huge deal, but in actual field use, noticeably less convenient than Canon's EXTERNAL (on the outer collar) red dot placement; (5) finally (this "con" may perhaps be more suitably placed on the Zeiss 95mm Circular Polarizer, rather than on the 15/2.8 lens itself?), the Zeiss 95mm Circular Polarizing filter (sold as an expensive optional accessory) is interesting (I own it), and it does "work" with this lens, HOWEVER, be prepared for some very sifnificant (almost unrepairable) VIGNETTING. I've found this problematic at all apertures and focusing distances, but particularly at the smaller apertures (e.g. f/8; f/11; etc.). I find this disappointing (though not completely unexpected) considering that this is a Zeiss designed and dedicated filter, specifically optioned on the Zeiss 15/2.8. Additionally vexing, because of the semi-circular integral lens shade, REMOVING the filter from the lens can sometimes be difficult (there's very little filter area to grip, due to hood incursion).

    So...in summary, I'm VERY happy with my Zeiss 15/2.8, and I find that it's almost always on my short list of must-take-with-me lenses. I still use and will never sell my Canon 17/4L-TSE, and I do find some niche use for my Canon 8-15/4L. My Canon 15/2.8 Fish and 16-35/2.8L-II have seen much less action over the past 8 months (since I've purchased the Zeiss 15/2.8), and alas, I must admit, my Canon 14/2.8L-II has been virtually side-lined (forgotten). If you enjoy wide or ultra-wide shooting, or if you otherwise have a need for a lens in this focal length range, and if you're willing/able to focus manually, then I really can't imagine anyone being less than very happy with this truly excellent optic. As with all tools, if you understand and accept its limitations (see above), it will serve you faithfully and well, and offer you many, many years of satisfaction and reward...

    VS

    Most Liked Negative Review

     

    Wait for alternatives

    I am a Zeiss fan. I use a Zeiss 21mm f2.8 on a Leica M9 and constantly marvel at the edge to edge detail. So I really anticipated the 15mm for Canon. I...Read complete review

    I am a Zeiss fan. I use a Zeiss 21mm f2.8 on a Leica M9 and constantly marvel at the edge to edge detail. So I really anticipated the 15mm for Canon. I also have a 5D III and enjoy shooting very wide landscapes in southern Utah. Unfortunately, I had to return this lens. Optically it is as advertised. Very clear and undistorted edge to edge. But there were two problems. One was the lens cap. Tilt the lens down and it falls off. It cannot be attached to the lens and is useless if the lens is not in a case. The other was the focus scale. Actual infinity focus was way short of the infinity mark on the lens. The only way to focus the lens I received was with the focus light in the camera viewfinder. And then I could not touch the lens without moving the large and very sensitive focus ring. So much for the signed certificate of quality control.

    Here are the options for Canon users. I own or have owned each:

    17mm f4 TS/E. Optically as good as the Zeiss 15. It is slower (f4) but I don't find that a drawback for shooting landscapes. Best flare control of all the wides I have used. It will not take filters and has a large exposed bulb in front that must be protected. The tilt/shift features are a real plus. I think this is the best option to the Zeiss for now.

    Canon 14mm f2.8. In the center this is a very good lens but the corners are hit and miss and often are really bad. It will flare badly if the sun is in the frame.

    Canon 16-35 f2.8 II. Again, the center is excellent but the edges are soft and cannot be used in an enlargement. Flare can be a problem.

    Wides are Canon's biggest drawback at this time. There are frequent rumors of a new very wide Canon zoom similar to the Nikon 14-24 so I plan to shoot the 17 until a new lens comes along.

    Reviewed by 13 customers

    Sort by

    Displaying reviews 1-13

    Back to top

     
    5.0

    WOW !!

    By hobbes

    from vancouver b.c.

    About Me Photo Enthusiast

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Consistent Output
    • Durable
    • Easily Interchangeable
    • Nice Bokeh
    • Rugged
    • Strong Construction

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Landscape/Scenery
      • Night Photography
      • Weddings/Events
      • Wildlife Photos

      Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

      this is an amazing lens,,,cant really put into words how much i am enjoying shooting with this lens.

      • Was this a gift?:
      • No

      Share this review

       
      5.0

      Superb Manual Focus UWA

      By NWPhil

      from Oregon

      About Me Photo Enthusiast

      Verified Reviewer

      Pros

      • Consistent Output
      • Durable
      • Nice Bokeh
      • Strong Construction

      Cons

      • Heavy

      Best Uses

      • Indoors/Low Light
      • Landscape/Scenery
      • Night Photography
      • Video

      Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

      So in sum:
      - Yes, it's manual focus, so you need practice, patience and technique, as it's not easy to MF with any UWA;
      - the cap issue... as others said, a small piece of gaffers tape inside the cap will work
      - Filters: there are now new adapters (i.e. Wonderpana and Lee) that will work on this lens, and actually in other UWA; You don't have to buy zeiss filters - Marumi has an excellent thin CPL, and so does Zeiss now.
      - Infinity focus and scale issues - Yes, Zeiss will fix that even if out of sale warranty
      - mounting issues - a small piece of gaffer tape locates the inside red dot; so no more struggle to find it

      It's a fantastic lens, with beautiful color rendition, even with night shots - works great in starscapes btw. As others said, I barely have to adjust contrast or color, but being a UWA, one has to be careful framing; so, not a walk around lens, or snap-shots style.

      Share this review

      (4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens

      By robertwall

      from Atlanta, Georgia

      About Me Pro Photographer

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Consistent Output
      • Durable
      • Rugged
      • Strong Construction

      Cons

      • Heavy

      Best Uses

      • Indoors/Low Light
      • Landscape/Scenery

      Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

      Shooting architecture and real estate requires that I have a high quality ultra wide angle lens. For years my go to lens was the workhorse Canon EF 16-35mm f2.8L. In many ways, the Canon is an outstanding lens and I have come to rely upon it's flexibility reliability. But There were aspects that bothered me. Some of my work, particularly architectural work, is demanding. So I decided to bite the bullet and get the Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens. I have had the Zeiss now for about six weeks and have had the opportunity to use it extensively. This is what I have found. First of all, the build quality. The Zeiss is a solid, rugged lens. The Zeiss has outstanding range. I can now hold greater highlight detail while still retaining extraordinary shadow detail. The Zeiss is outstanding in low light shooting situations. The Zeiss is sharper that the Canon EF 16-35mm, even factoring in the fact that the Zeiss is manual focus. Plus, there is less barrel distortion with the Zeiss. These were the things I had expected when deciding on the Zeiss from having read a number of reviews of the lens. But I got a bonus I didn't expect: a savings in work flow time. The Zeiss is one of the most accurate lenses, color wise, I have ever had the privilege to shoot. I used to spend a considerable amount of time tweaking color, making sure my neutrals were neutral. I had come to expect this. With the Zeiss, my color tweaking is minimal, if I find it necessary at all. I have literally cut my work flow time in half. That is a benefit that is worth every penny I spent on the Zeiss. My one complaint about the Zeiss is that it is manual focus, and that you have to be very precise in focusing. But, if you take the few extra seconds to do this properly, the rewards you get are outstanding photographs. I am a Zeiss convert.

      Share this review

      (5 of 8 customers found this review helpful)

       
      5.0

      What a lens

      By mcgraphics

      from St Louis, MO

      About Me Pro Photographer

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Easily Interchangeable
      • Strong Construction
      • Very little distortion
      • Works Well With My Canon

      Cons

      • Heavy

      Best Uses

      • Big Groups
      • Landscape/Scenery

      Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

      I have not been a wide angle lens shooter until I bought the Zeiss.
      I was lucky to be able to use this lens at Maine Media Workshops and after I looked the results I had to have the lens. The shots where crystal clear and sharp.

      • Was this a gift?:
      • No

      Share this review

      (15 of 17 customers found this review helpful)

       
      5.0

      Here is the truth as of June 2013

      By Vonzable

      from Chandler AZ

      About Me Pro Photographer

      Pros

      • Consistent Output
      • Rugged
      • Strong Construction

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Indoors/Low Light
        • Night Photography

        Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

        I use this lens for Architectural photography. I almost passed on this product because of the reviews. Some stated that the lens cap falls off. FALSE. It is machined rather well and has a fuzzy inside coating that keeps it snug. Next the excessive weight. MODERATE. I use to shoot with the 16-35, and the weight seems about the same. The image quality is "night and day" over the Canon 16-35. With the financial terms available at B&H, it made this purchase a no brainer!!! The lens will pay for it self within a month. The Canon body still beeps when it hits the focus point, so there is no love lost with the manual focus. If you are serious, buy this lens. The lens hood has a flat spot so it is easy to set it down with out it rolling around. Photoshop/Bridge has a profile for this lens in the settings. JUST DO IT!!!! I thought about this purchase for a year. That's about 365 days of stupid procrastination.

        • Was this a gift?:
        • No

        Share this review

        (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

         
        5.0

        No lens cap falling off

        By Jason Zhou

        from Hong Kong

        About Me Photo Enthusiast

        Pros

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Landscape/Scenery

            Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

            I know people say if you tilt the lens down and the lens cap falls off. I don't know if Zeiss has done something to that already. But I know the one I got, it doesn't have this problem. Even when you face the lens straight to the ground, the lens cap stays where it should be.

            • Was this a gift?:
            • No

            Share this review

            (19 of 20 customers found this review helpful)

             
            4.0

            Excellent overall...fun to use!

            By Triple7

            from Alexandria, VA

            About Me Semi-pro Photographer

            Pros

            • Consistent Output
            • Durable
            • Easily Interchangeable
            • Optically Outstanding
            • Premium Build Quality
            • Strong Construction
            • Very Smooth Focusing

            Cons

            • Difficult to Clean
            • Heavy
            • Lens Cap - See Fix
            • Vignetting With Zeiss Pol

            Best Uses

            • Indoors/Low Light
            • Landscape/Scenery
            • Weddings/Events

            Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

            (4.5 Stars)...I use this lens for travel and landscape photography. I shoot with Canon 1 and 5 series bodies. I also own and use several other "premium" ultra-wide angle lenses, including Canon's own 14/2.8L-II; 15/2.8; 8-15/4L; 16-35/2.8L-II; 17/4L-TSE; and Zeiss 18/3.5. Predictably, each of these lenses have their own strengths and weaknesses. My impressions after considerable in-field use follow.

            The Zeiss 15/2.8 is very enjoyable to use, and for me, produces excellent, exciting results. I find the manual focus to be considerably more smooth than ANY of the autofocus lenses afore-mentioned, and focusing accuracy is not difficult, using OEM standard Canon focusing screens. I'm able to focus accurately and consistently (although after years of relying perhaps too heavily on autofocus, I'm reminded that manual focusing is a skill, and one which deteriorates with neglect). Nonetheless, for landcape and travel photography, I find the Zeiss 15/2.8 to be VERY SMOOTH AND PRECISE in its manual focusing ability. I don't rely on the accuracy of the focusing distance hash marks on the lens barrel when focusing (I judge focus through the viewfinder and/or with LIVE VIEW, without reference to the distance marks on the lens, so the previous post regarding inaccurate distance markers on the lens is not relevant in my use. If I DO use the fixed distance markers on the lens (as when setting hyperfocal distance, for example), I just note indicated distances WHILE CROSS-REFERENCING ACTUAL IN-FOCUS SETTINGS THROUGH THE VIEWFINDER AND/OR LIVE VIEW, without worrying that the "0.8 meters" indication on the lens barrel might more accurately represent "0.6 meters" in reality. Yes, 0.2 meters can make a huge difference if you're very close to your subject, but again, if you use the viewfinder and/or LIVE VIEW to judge focus, the accuracy of the lens barrel markings become a moot point). By the way, I only use the "green dot" (Canon's "in-focus" indicator in the viewfinder) as a rough guide for finding focus; for greater accuracy, I pay close attention to the details in the viewfinder which I consider to be most important within a given scene, and I gently roll the focusing collar back and forth, with decreasing throw, until subject details are rendered with maximum sharpness. For best precision, of course, use of a tripod and LIVE VIEW - or even just live view mode by itself - with appropriate live view magnification, will result in a very, very sharply focused subject.

            In my use, I find the Zeiss 15/2.8 to be visibly sharper in the center, and DRAMATICALLY SHARPER IN THE CORNERS, than both my Canon 14/2.8L-II and my Canon 16-35/2.8L-II. Vignetting with the Zeiss 15/2.8 is similar (f/2.8~f/4) to the Canon 14/2.8L-II, and about 1-2 stops greater (darker) than the Canon 16-35/2.8L-II wide open. Most noticeable with the Zeiss 15/2.8 is the extremely pleasing color rendition. It's difficult to describe adequately, but it's noticeable and it's quite lovely. Bokeh rendition is also pleasant, though (like most wide/ultra-wide lenses), not "Wow." Flare control is very good - better than any of my Canon ultra-wides, with the exception of the 17/4L-TSE, which is also very good.

            I agree with previous posters who have observed that the Zeiss 15/2.8 is optically superior (in virtually every measure) to any (all) of the Canon ultra-wide lenses, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE EXCELLENT AND EXTREMELY VERSATILE 17/4L-TSE. Obviously, the Canon 17/4L-TSE has the advantage of perspective control, the value of which cannot be underestimated, however, I do find focusing, holding and general handling of the Canon 17/4L-TSE to be less comfortable - and therefore, less enjoyable - than the Zeiss 15/2.8. Mounted on a tripod, and used patiently and with great premeditation, the Canon 17/4L-TSE is superlative; about equal in optical quality to the Zeiss 15/2.8. Of course, the Zeis has a few degrees extra width in its perspective, and again, the color and detail rendering on the Zeiss is uniquely satisfying.

            Clearly, the Zeiss 15/2.8 has some very compelling "pro's"; here are a few "con's" in my opinion: (1) complaints about the front lens cap being too loose and falling off ARE VALID. My biggest hassle with this issue was that in removing the lens from my bag, the cap would invariably "auto-detach" and remain in the bag, having been pulled off as I lifted the lens out. This created an extra step - and extra time - that I had to expend in retrieving the cap from the bottom of the slot in my bag where the lens was stored. Storing the lens inverted in my bag (lens cap facing up) was not a convenient option, as the front element is quite large, which makes it less than ideal as a gripping surface (not to mention the risk of dropping the lens because you've picked it up by the lens cap, which is already too loose!). SOLUTION: I found that carefully and discretely placing a very small stip of black Gaffer's Tape to each side of the built-in metal lens shade on the Zeiss 15/2.8 lens added just enough extra diameter to the lens shade, that the otherwise nice metal lens cap fits quite snugly - easy to remove, but grippy enough to stay on the lens, even when pulling it out of its tightly padded nest in my lens bag! Cheap, easy fix!; (2) the coating on the front element of the Zeiss 15/2.8, though lovely to behold, is quite tacky (sticky), hence, not easy to clean. If you prefer using dry lens tissue to wipe your lenses, you'll find this to be a delicate, difficult task, with lots of torn tissue. Not a major setback, but something to be aware of and prepared for; (3) the lens has no rubber gasket to seal the lens-to-camera mount (unlike most Canon "L" lenses). Again, not a big deal, really, but you WILL notice some tiny ingress of dust and debris if you leave this lens attached to your camera while subjecting it to extensive travel and use; (on the other hand, Canon's thin rubber lens seals are notoriously delicate (they're easy to tear or damage, even when mounting slowly and carefully), so maybe this, too, is a small point?; (4) like all Zeiss ZE lenses, the Zeiss 15/2.8 has the lens-to-camera mounting alignment "red dot" painted ON THE INNER SURFACE (the flat, silver surface where the electronic contacts are), which makes it a bit more difficult to see and use while mounting the lens. Once again, not a huge deal, but in actual field use, noticeably less convenient than Canon's EXTERNAL (on the outer collar) red dot placement; (5) finally (this "con" may perhaps be more suitably placed on the Zeiss 95mm Circular Polarizer, rather than on the 15/2.8 lens itself?), the Zeiss 95mm Circular Polarizing filter (sold as an expensive optional accessory) is interesting (I own it), and it does "work" with this lens, HOWEVER, be prepared for some very sifnificant (almost unrepairable) VIGNETTING. I've found this problematic at all apertures and focusing distances, but particularly at the smaller apertures (e.g. f/8; f/11; etc.). I find this disappointing (though not completely unexpected) considering that this is a Zeiss designed and dedicated filter, specifically optioned on the Zeiss 15/2.8. Additionally vexing, because of the semi-circular integral lens shade, REMOVING the filter from the lens can sometimes be difficult (there's very little filter area to grip, due to hood incursion).

            So...in summary, I'm VERY happy with my Zeiss 15/2.8, and I find that it's almost always on my short list of must-take-with-me lenses. I still use and will never sell my Canon 17/4L-TSE, and I do find some niche use for my Canon 8-15/4L. My Canon 15/2.8 Fish and 16-35/2.8L-II have seen much less action over the past 8 months (since I've purchased the Zeiss 15/2.8), and alas, I must admit, my Canon 14/2.8L-II has been virtually side-lined (forgotten). If you enjoy wide or ultra-wide shooting, or if you otherwise have a need for a lens in this focal length range, and if you're willing/able to focus manually, then I really can't imagine anyone being less than very happy with this truly excellent optic. As with all tools, if you understand and accept its limitations (see above), it will serve you faithfully and well, and offer you many, many years of satisfaction and reward...

            • Was this a gift?:
            • No

            Share this review

            (8 of 16 customers found this review helpful)

             
            3.0

            Wait for alternatives

            By George

            from Salt Lake City, Utah

            About Me Semi-pro Photographer

            Pros

            • Optically excellent

            Cons

            • Inaccurate Focus Scale
            • Useless Cap

            Best Uses

            • Landscape/Scenery

            Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

            I am a Zeiss fan. I use a Zeiss 21mm f2.8 on a Leica M9 and constantly marvel at the edge to edge detail. So I really anticipated the 15mm for Canon. I also have a 5D III and enjoy shooting very wide landscapes in southern Utah. Unfortunately, I had to return this lens. Optically it is as advertised. Very clear and undistorted edge to edge. But there were two problems. One was the lens cap. Tilt the lens down and it falls off. It cannot be attached to the lens and is useless if the lens is not in a case. The other was the focus scale. Actual infinity focus was way short of the infinity mark on the lens. The only way to focus the lens I received was with the focus light in the camera viewfinder. And then I could not touch the lens without moving the large and very sensitive focus ring. So much for the signed certificate of quality control.

            Here are the options for Canon users. I own or have owned each:

            17mm f4 TS/E. Optically as good as the Zeiss 15. It is slower (f4) but I don't find that a drawback for shooting landscapes. Best flare control of all the wides I have used. It will not take filters and has a large exposed bulb in front that must be protected. The tilt/shift features are a real plus. I think this is the best option to the Zeiss for now.

            Canon 14mm f2.8. In the center this is a very good lens but the corners are hit and miss and often are really bad. It will flare badly if the sun is in the frame.

            Canon 16-35 f2.8 II. Again, the center is excellent but the edges are soft and cannot be used in an enlargement. Flare can be a problem.

            Wides are Canon's biggest drawback at this time. There are frequent rumors of a new very wide Canon zoom similar to the Nikon 14-24 so I plan to shoot the 17 until a new lens comes along.

            • Was this a gift?:
            • No

            Share this review

            (3 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

             
            4.0

            Very Sharp

            By Zoltar

            from MN

            About Me Pro Photographer

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Consistent Output
            • Rugged
            • Strong Construction

            Cons

            • Heavy
            • Manual Focus

            Best Uses

            • Landscape/Scenery
            • Night Photography

            Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

            Pros: Great for landscapes. Love that it's a superwide that you can use circular filters. It is really sharp.
            Cons: The lens hood is fixed so you can't use ND filters. I tried holding the filter but it did not cover side to side because I had to hold it out where the lens hood ends.

            • Was this a gift?:
            • No

            Share this review

            (1 of 9 customers found this review helpful)

             
            5.0

            Great lens.

            By Nena

            from Los Angeles

            About Me Photo Enthusiast

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Consistent Output
            • Durable
            • Easily Interchangeable
            • Nice Bokeh
            • Strong Construction

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Indoors/Low Light
              • Landscape/Scenery
              • Night Photography
              • Video

              Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

              I love this lens because it takes superior quality images and ...the lens feels just great.

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No

              Share this review

              (5 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

               
              5.0

              Exquisite optics

              By Malacologist

              from Los Angeles

              About Me Semi-pro Photographer

              Verified Buyer

              Pros

              • Consistent Output
              • Easily Interchangeable
              • Rugged
              • Strong Construction

              Cons

              • Bad Lens Cap
              • Heavy

              Best Uses

              • Indoors/Low Light
              • Landscape/Scenery

              Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

              The lens is a rectilinear 110 degree lens with unbelievably low distortion (2%!). The corners are sharper than the famous Zeiss 21 mm. Close focus capability opens interesting opportunities for composition. Because of the immense angle, one has to be careful not to bump into close objects. One must focus carefully, so a matt focusing screen with microprism is almost a must; focus assist does work on 5d mkII. Even wide open, light fall-off to corners is not objectionable. Moderately stopped down, depth of field is extensive.

              Unfortunately, the 95 mm center filter for the Schneider 72 XL cannot be used on the Zeiss 15 mm ZE, because of the oversized design of the filter and the built-in lens hood of the Zeiss lens. The Zeiss CF for the 15 mm lens is for the ZM series, and not compatible with the ZE series. For those concerned about light fall-off will have to resort to digital techniques.

              Feel and finish is as one would expect from Zeiss, to the T*. Internal focus will help with keeping dirt and moisture out of the lens. It is a big piece of glass for the focal length, so not suitable for candid shots, as this lens will garner attention.

              The biggest complaint is the Zeiss slip-on lens cap, which has a poor fit and will fall off almost immediately. I strongly suggest to get a front protection filter, and/or a snap-on third party cap.

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No

              Share this review

              (6 of 7 customers found this review helpful)

               
              5.0

              An optical marvel

              By Daniel Geiger

              from Los Angeles

              About Me Semi-pro Photographer

              Pros

              • Consistent Output
              • Durable
              • Easily Interchangeable
              • Image quality
              • Rectilinear
              • Strong Construction

              Cons

              • Heavy
              • Poor Cap Fit

              Best Uses

              • Indoors/Low Light
              • Landscape/Scenery
              • Wildlife Photos

              Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

              Just received this lens today and did a few test shots. It is a STUNNING lens. The lack of distortion at that angle is beyond belief. Took some images of narrow rows of shelving, and it is all straight. The close focus capability with M of 1:9 opens great creative possibilities. When I framed some shots and looked up, I was surprised just how close I was to the object. For interior shots it is beyond what can be seen, but is more of what the room feels like when looking around.

              Corner softness is hardly noticeable, much less so than on my CY Zeiss 21 mm, a legend in its own right.

              in optical performance, the lens is very close to the Schneider 72 mm XL I use on 4x5". The availability of a center filter for that is possibly the only upside.

              The only disappointment is the poor fit of the slip-on lens cap. It falls off after a few seconds if the lens is held pointing downwards. Have to contact Zeiss about it.

              Otherwise, it is what you expect from a Zeiss lens: silk smooth operation, perfect finish, and image quality, of course.

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No

              Share this review

              (30 of 35 customers found this review helpful)

               
              5.0

              Zeiss perfection

              By AB

              from Ljubljana, SI

              About Me Pro Photographer

              Pros

              • Consistent Output
              • Durable
              • Rugged
              • Strong Construction

              Cons

              • Heavy

              Best Uses

              • Landscape/Scenery

              Comments about Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount:

              If you are hesitating to get this lens just like I was, let me fill you in from the Pro's point of view.

              Canon has at the moment no competition for it - the 14mm is not good at all, the 15mm is fisheye and the 17mm TS lens is not filter friendly with its protruding front lens and also f/4...

              Like all recent Zeiss lenses this one is built in Japan (by Cosina) with the strict Zeiss quality control - a hand-signed certificate in every box proves this fact.
              It is huge, built like a tank and very expensive, just like a Zeiss lens should be.

              The picture quality is just amazing. Very low vignetting, little distortion (barrel) and stunning edge-to-edge sharpness. You must be very careful where you put your focus at f/2.8, but if you nail it the results are perfect!

              If Canon comes up with a 35 or 40 megapixel body a lot of Hasselblads and Phase One architecture & landscape shooters will reconsider their expensive systems and perhaps opt for this lens instead.

              In one sentence - know that unless you shoot architecture and landscapes this will not be the main lens on your body, but if you have the funds, by all means - go and buy it!

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No

              Share this review

              Filters & Filter Kits

              Zeiss -  95mm Carl Zeiss T* UV Filter
              • Price: $317.00
               
              Zeiss -  95mm Carl Zeiss T* Circular Polarizer Filter
              • Price: $509.00
               

              Lens Mount Caps

              Show more >
              Sensei -  Cap Keeper Lens Cap Holder
              • Price: $1.99
               

              Lens Wraps & Bands

              OP/TECH USA -  19" Soft Wrap (Black)
              • Price: $11.78
               
              LENSband -  Lens Band (Black)
              • Price: $4.99
               
              View all Accessories
              See any errors on this page? Let us know.

              Close

              Close

              Close