Photography

Hands-on Review

Regardless of make and model, each of the following DSLRs is the best offering from the camera manufacturers represented in our Professional DSLR Roundup. Although many of these cameras seem similar in many respects to their mid- and entry-level counterparts—at least on paper—the narrative changes dramatically once you pick one up.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

Back in 2009 Olympus rattled roofs when they unveiled their first mirrorless camera, the Olympus E-P1. Bedecked in a retro-style body that channeled the vibes of the original Olympus Pen, a popular half-frame film camera from the 1960s, the “Digital PEN” was an instant hit.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

On the surface, it’s sometimes hard to tell the differences between entry-level and mid-level DSLRs. Though some mid-level DSLRs are physically larger than entry-level models, they’re not always larger—and even when they are it’s often not by much.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

Considering the degree of advanced technology contained in the average entry-level DSLR these days, one often feels the urge to add an asterisk to the term “entry-level,” because smaller size and plastic body panels aside, each of these cameras is a real honker in its own right.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

Despite the growing availability of some impressively small mirrorless digital-camera systems, the market for bridge-style cameras continues to hold its own. If you think about it, it’s kind of cool to know you can purchase a technology-packed digital camera that can capture up to 10 frames per second, HD video with Dolby sound, and sports  a fixed 36x optical zoom lens no less for a few hundred dollars.

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3 years ago
News

Studio lights are essential for many types of product and fashion shots, and I’ve used them for decades. Sometimes I like to keep things simple, though, and it’s fun to challenge myself to create lighting that evokes a mood and an emotion with just a single portable flash. I recently photographed a beautiful young model, Ellecie White of Hillsboro, Tennessee, and I thought this would be the perfect time to minimize my equipment. I felt it would be less intimidating to a five-year-old, and I was sure I could create the type of lighting I wanted.



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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

With few exceptions, a camera with a ten-to-twelve power, wide angle to telephoto zoom lens should be more than enough optical coverage to satisfy anyone’s needs. As for the specifics, we’re talking about a zoom lens with an angle-of-view range of about 74° to 8°.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

Lowel’s Rifa Lites have long been popular lighting tools for photographers who need or desire a continuous light source that produces a soft, flattering light and folds down narrow enough to slip into a tube for fast and easy transit to and from assignments.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

The Lowel SoftCore Lighting Systemis designed to turn any softbox you might currently own into a cool-running, fluorescent lamp based lighting system containing up to five 80W CRI fluorescent lamps. 

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

If the nature of your photographic work requires swaths of even, continuous light, Lowel’s TRIO 1 is well worth investigating. Designed for use with your choice of 55W high CRI, daylight- or tungsten-balanced fluorescent lamps, Lowel’s TRIO 1 lamp heads are well suited for portraiture and mid-sized tabletop applications.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

Maintaining clean color balance when shooting stills and video in mixed lighting has long been problematic in portraiture, fashion, beauty and textile applications. But with the introduction of the Lowel Blender, maintaining color balance is easy.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

The number of fast, wide-aperture prime optics we carry at B&H has grown over the past year, and in a world that has become increasingly populated by slower, variable aperture zooms, this is encouraging news.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

When you read the selling points of professional-grade cameras such as Canon’s 1D series and Nikon’s D3 series, the manufacturers make a point of discussing the heavy-duty construction and exhaustive measures of weatherproofing that go into their respective cameras.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

There’s something inherently seductive about a compact camera with a fast, fixed, wide-angle lens and a top ISO of 3200, especially if you’ve got a thing for low-light street shooting or taking pictures in places where tripods and flash are frowned upon or downright prohibited.

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

If you've ever flown over the Grand Canyon or Rocky mountains at 35,000 feet, you already know how humbling and enlightening this experience can be. Tall mountains appear small, almost flush to the plains leading up to them.  

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3 years ago

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