Photography

Hands-on Review

Color management in digital photography is the supervision of color from input to output. A camera captures color, a monitor displays this color accurately and a printer outputs what's on the screen. Seem simple? Guess again.

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3 years ago
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Think about all the time that models (and women prepping for a big event such as their wedding) put into making their eyelashes look perfe

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3 years ago
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When I started out in photography shooting slide film, I was trained to carry two "mandatory" filters: a polarizer and a set of graduated neutral density filters (ND-grads). Polarizing filters not only increase contrast in skies, but they are indispensible in removing glare and reflections from water and foliage. ND-grad filters offer a way of compressing tones in scenes with a large dynamic range.




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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Flash exposures are interesting in that, with the exception of the lightning-like blasts of light produced by larger studio systems and the tinier “poofs” of light emitted from pop-up flashes, to the human eye all flash exposures are perceived as being equal in value even though they might differ by several stops.

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3 years ago
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With the introduction of the Sony α SLT-A77 and SLT-A65, the folks at Sony are apparently running with their fixed, translucent-mirror formula as a vehicle that sets them apart from the competition, and based on the specs of their latest offerings, they’re taking the challenge quite seriously—especially when it comes to the alpha A77, a second-generation Translucent Mirror Technology DSLR.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

Just over a year ago Sony introduced its first mirrorless camera systems, the NEX-3 and NEX-5, to a very receptive public. To almost everyone’s amazement, Sony was able to design a highly functional camera that was both smaller than many point-and-shoot cameras, yet contained a comparatively monstrous APS-C format imaging sensor.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

Sony’s new alpha SLT-A65 looks remarkably similar to Sony’s first-generation fixed translucent mirror cameras, the SLT-A33 and SLT-A55, but in addition to a number of small and not-so-small improvements found on the new camera is the very same all-new 24.5MP APS-C CMOS sensor found in Sony’s flagship SLT-A77.



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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

With the introduction of the SLT-A77 and SLT-A65, Sony is making it perfectly clear they are proceeding full speed ahead with the fixed, translucent mirror technology cameras introduced last year. The top gun of the two new DSLRs is the Sony alpha SLT-A77, which in addition to a hefty, weather resistant, magnesium-alloy body, features an all-new 24.5MP APS-C CMOS sensor, making it the highest-resolution DSLR among APS-C format DSLRs.



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3 years ago
Buying Guide

Most underwater exploration takes place during the day, in open water. The underwater photographer can create three-dimensional-looking images by carefully balancing the ambient light of the background with the artificial light that is used to illuminate the subject.

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3 years ago
News

I was reading a forum post by someone, who said, "I prefer prime lenses, and would rather zoom with my feet." I also read a blog post by someone that was comparing lenses of two different focal lengths, and they said, "If I want a wider angle, I'll just back up." Now, of course we've heard these references to "zooming with our feet" for years, but does it really work? We'll explore that in today's blog post.




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3 years ago
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One of the limitations of today's digital cameras is that they cannot capture the dynamic range of the human eye. Indeed, our eyes are very sensative organs and have much more latitude than an imaging sensor. Back in the film days, we used to dodge and burn accordingly to get what we wanted. But these days, we just create a High Dynamic Range (HDR) photo. In the video below, the experts over at Kelby Training give us an intro to this process and show us how it can be useful in practical situations.

Take a look at the video after hitting the read and discuss button and for more in-depth training please visit Kelbytraining.com. They also have full one day seminars at Kelbytraininglive.com.


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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Back in the early days of photography, panoramic photographs, which by definition are wide-field, unbroken sweeps of scenery, were captured using cameras with pivoting lens turrets that “painted” the image across a wide sheet of film as the lens rotated from left to right (or vice versa).

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3 years ago
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Have you ever looked at photographs and wondered how they were lit? Strobist diagrams can help after the fact, but what about before: how do you know how to get the look you want? Consider a cinematography technique: lighting your scene one light at a time.







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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

“Summer” is short for “let’s get out of the house and hit the shore, the trails, or anywhere else one can get out and enjoy those lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer…” and don’t forget the camera.  But before you start wrapping your digital camera in bubble wrap to protect it from the ravages of surf and turf, you might want to check out the dozens of waterproof, crushproof and shockproof pocket cameras we stock at B&H.

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3 years ago
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A well-known photographer was once quoted as saying, “... a good photographer on the wrong side of the fence is a bad photographer." Maybe that's true, maybe not. However, if you extrapolate that thought, it can be interpreted to mean not only knowing how, when, and where to shoot, but when and where not to shoot, when to say something to a client and when to keep quiet. In short, sometimes it's better to be prudent than to be good.








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3 years ago

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