Photography

What a kick to be invited to be part of B&H's new B&H Insights blog. If you're reading this, you know that this is a great place to stop for the latest, greatest news about anything photo, video or sound related—tons of good information here. Since this is my first post for B&H Insights, let me give you just a bit of personal background.

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3 years ago
Features

Watch Episode One of "Real Exposures"Join us for an in depth conversation with the acclaimed photographer, teacher, and author Harvey Stein in our new video series entitled Real Exposures. Find out what drove Harvey to walk away from his MBA and a career in engineering to pursue photography in his late 20's. He shares how and where he finds inspiration, his camera and lens choices for capturing people on the street, and how photography saved his life...

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3 years ago
Features

Most people are familiar with instant film as a means to instantly capture fun and tangible photos with a vintage look to them. But did you ever brainstorm other ways to make good use of the tiny prints? Take a look at these three fresh ways to use them.

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3 years ago
Features

Photographers often ask me about the composition of my photographs, and why I settled on composing images in a particular way. I typically respond with the five tips that I was once taught during my early learning stages of photography. Here are some great rules of thumb on how to creatively think about and do composition.

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3 years ago
Features

The industry's tallest, strongest tripods are usually made of carbon fiber, assembled in Europe, and cost tons of money. Buyers are typically well-funded professionals or hobbyists with a lot of disposable income. While a pro set of $900+ sticks might not be in the cards for everyone, serious photographers and video makers would do well to consider the budget-friendly Slik Pro 700DX.

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3 years ago
Buying Guide

Like most photographers, I have a love-hate relationship with the tools I use. I am as captivated as the next photographer by the promise of the newest cameras, yet I am loath to give up old strategies that have served me so well. As a photographer, I depend on my cameras to make the pictures I want to make. As a professional, I depend on that same gear to earn my living.

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3 years ago
Features

I'm a big fan of cameras that fit in my pocket. I'm also aware of how dainty some of the tinier digicams can be, which is why I've been even a bigger fan of the more rugged, tough digicams that have come to market over the past couple of years from Olympus, Panasonic, Canon, and Fuji. Add to this list the Pentax Optio W90.

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3 years ago
News

You can’t talk about the video DSLR revolution without mentioning Philip Bloom. A British director and director of photography , Bloom launched his blog www.philipbloom.co.uk almost 3 years ago. Designed to get the attention of potential clients, the site has evolved into one of the leading forums for DSLR video discussion and education. On a recent trip to New York, Philip Bloom sat down with David Flores to discuss education, work, and the latest equipment.

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3 years ago
Features

Every photographer, both amateur and professional, has at one time or another rested their camera on a rock, a crumpled coat, or some other handy object when they didn’t have access to a more traditional camera support. You might need to do this when you want to get into a photo yourself or when you can’t hold a camera steady in low light. Many tripods are too big and heavy to carry with you at all times. But here we have a collection of tabletop and miniature tripods that are so small and compact you can keep one with you every day. They also make great gifts for photographers who seem to have everything else.

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3 years ago
Buying Guide

A professional photographer is someone who can take a photograph that's technically and aesthetically right on the money with even the most basic of imaging tools, though few, if any, would bet their reputations on entry-level cameras on a regular basis. That's because as feature-packed as under-$500 cameras are, they're simply not up to taking the pounding pro-quality DSLRs are subjected to on a daily basis. But ruggedness is only part of the equation when it comes to the top guns of DSLR cameras.

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3 years ago
Buying Guide

Panasonic has added a trio of new guns: a Lumix G 14mm/2.5 ASPH wide-angle, a Lumix G Vario 100-300mm/f4-5.6 OIS super zoom and most intriguing of the three, a "two-eyed" Lumix G 12.5mm/f12.5 3D lens designed to capture 3D imagery when used with Panasonic Lumix G-series cameras.

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3 years ago
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Traditionally, the 3D camera operated with two lenses to emulate the manner in which our two eyes see in "stereo," and produced two images at slightly different angles to create the 3D illusion. Here is a group of cameras that will give you the ability to create 3D images and videos that you can view on your home HDTV.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

If you're into bird watching, the holy grail would have to be the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker, a huge (20" tall with a 30" wingspan), yet incredibly elusive woodpecker that despite reports of extinction, is spotted every now-and-then deep in the boonies of Florida and Arkansas. It's also known as the 'Lord G-d' woodpecker because that's what spotters have been known to blurt out - often accompanied by soiled trousers - when dive-bombed by one. 'Lord G-d' has also been exclaimed - minus the soiled trousers - by those seeing a Canon 1200/5.6L USM for the first time. At 36lbs, 33" long and 9" wide at the front element, calling this lens a 'tele' is like calling King Kong a monkey.

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3 years ago
Features

Your camera's built-in flash is designed to replicate neutral color in your photographs, which means when you take pictures of Uncle Jake and Aunt Millie, their skin-tone shouldn't foretell a looming case of food poisoning or festering liver condition. But sometimes you need a break from the visual comfort of neutrality, and that's where Sticky Filters come into the picture (pun unintended, but I'm running with it anyway).

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3 years ago
Features

I have blogged, lectured and argued for many years that a camera is nothing more than a tool that solves a given photographer’s problem. A camera brand is not a symbol of loyalty to one kind of photography, nor is it some kind of credential for membership in some kind of “club.” The sooner each photographer starts to figure out what their particular challenges are, and which camera works for them to resolve those challenges (regardless of brand), the sooner they will start making the kind of photographs they want. Recent experience has taught me that I need to start talking the same way about the laptop computers that photographers use for digital image processing.

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3 years ago
News

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