Photography

June is the hottest, harshest month of the year. The heat and humidity index might be higher in July and August, but light-wise, June is hands-down hotter and harsher. What I'm referring to is the quality of light that washes down upon us as the sun rises to its highest midday point in the sky—and the net effect of all this bright, high-angle light, photographically speaking, is an excess of blue tint and harsh contrast levels.

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Wolverine has introduced a new line of portable digital back-up drives. Designed as a convenient, lightweight solution for downloading and storing digital still and video image files from memory cards or directly from digital cameras and camcorders, they are collectively known as Wolverine PicPac II Digital Camera & Camcorder Portable Backup Drives.

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News

Tornado warnings. 60 mile-per-hour winds. Rain. Lightning. Generally, when you hear these weather alerts, the last thing you are thinking about is going out to shoot. But time and again I have learned the hard way, that if you don't give it a try, you may miss a great shot.

by Tom Bol |
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3 years ago
Features

For some photographers, any tripod head will do. And while this may hold true for many shooters, others eventually get to a point at which the subject matter they're pursuing—and sometimes where they're pursuing their subjects—starts revealing the limitations of the pan or ball head they've been using until that time. If this rings familiar, you might want to look into Induro's PHQ-series 5-Way Panheads.

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News

There isn't much you cannot do with the simplest of cameras nowadays, but even the best of the lot have their limitations when it comes to tricky exposure scenarios. The Promote Control, from Promote Systems, is a remote-control device that enables you to push the so-called limitations of your camera's standard operating parameters, making it possible to capture images that may not have been feasible using your camera's standard exposure capabilities before.

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News

The name GigaPan first came to national attention at President Obama's inauguration, when it was used to capture "the largest picture in the world." To the delight of all of the photo and techno geeks tuning in to the day's festivities, Wolf Blitzer and other on-air commentators kept returning to the real-time photo collage like kids in a candy store. They couldn't get enough of it and apparently, neither could viewers.  And now, the hardware used to produce these awesome images is available at B&H Photo and in a choice of three flavors, no less.

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3 years ago
News

Things have changed since the earliest IBM MicroDrives made their debut back in the late '90s. Essentially 1" hard drives, MicroDrives owned the market for quite some time. Originally available in two smallish capacities— 170MB and 340MB—they were soon available in 512MB, 1GB, 2GB and 4GB sizes to satisfy the growing needs of the rapidly expanding digital camera market. And they weren't cheap, with larger-capacity cards running upwards of a thousand-plus dollars. Unlike the solid-state cards sold nowadays, dropping a MicroDrive was tantamount to dropping a laptop. 

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Tips and Solutions

The other day, while I was out riding my old Schwinn, I had a work-related "Ah-hah!" moment despite the fact that the B&H Employee Handbook explicitly prohibits doing company business on personal time. But when one enjoys what one does for a living, it invariably spills into one's personal life, even when riding an old bike along a tree-lined canal trail.

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

If you're shopping for a lens hood for that snazzy new lens you just bought, or perhaps you've lost the one that came with your lens and had a near heart attack when you found out how much it would cost to replace it, Pearstone has introduced a line of snap-on, tulip-style lens shades, and they're all priced under $20.

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3 years ago
Features

When Steve Jobs introduced the new iPhone 4 at the recent WWDC10 Conference, he described the latest iPhone incarnation as being "… the most precise thing we've ever made. There is glass on front and the backside and it has stainless steel around it. Its closest kin is a beautiful old Leica camera." That’s a pretty heady statement from an equally heady mover and shaker. But iconic referencing aside, how true is this statement?   

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Features

When it comes to offering advice about photo gear, camera bags are perhaps the toughest to qualify due to the numerous variables that go into the process of choosing the best bag for one's needs and tastes.

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Hands-on Review

 

The original Mamiya RZ67 medium-format was introduced back in 1982 and has since gone through a series of upgrades each designed in response to user needs and evolving imaging technologies. The 4th and latest generation upgrade is the Mamiya RZ33, which is the first fully integrated RZ-based, cable-free digital imaging system.

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News

Fans attending a concert in the Nikon at Jones Beach Theater this summer might find it ironic that they're forbidden to use a DSLR camera, even one made by Nikon. Isn't that like being told that you can't pull out your credit card in Citi Field? Read the rules posted about the amphitheater at Jonesbeach.com and it states: "No professional cameras. No audio or video recording devices."

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3 years ago
Features

Panasonic's Lumix-series digicams have evolved over the years into one of the more popular choices among shoppers seeking well-designed point-and-shoot cameras that deliver robust image files. One of the newest models to join Panasonic's digicam line-up is the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FP3.

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News

I've long been a big fan of wide-angle lenses, so I was really pleased when David Edelstein (our intrepid Nikon sales muckety-muck) dropped off one of the 1st production samples of Nikon's latest ultra-wide zoom lens, the AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm/4G ED VR.

The first thing you notice about Nikon's new AF-S 16-35/4G ED VR is its size. Though in no way heavy, and if anything, quite well balanced, the lens looks more like a moderate zoom lens, say a 28-105, as compared to the shorter physical sizes of 'typical' wide zooms. Looks aside, Nikon's latest ultra-wide addition to its growing optical line-up is a true wide-zoom workhorse.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

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