aperture

A funny thing happened as photographic technology became better and better: lenses got smarter, but photographers?—not necessarily.

Yes, modern lenses are ultra-sharp and super-contrasty, they focus automatically, and undesirable artifacts like chromatic aberration and barrel distortion have improved. However, autofocus technology has brought three critical changes that serious photographers need to consider carefully when they choose their lenses, because they can be a hindrance to thoughtful photography if not used carefully.

Editor's Note: This is a guest blogpost by Brian Dilg of NYFA. For more educational resources, you can check out lots of their classes.

7
Share
1 year ago
News

Welcome to Part 1 of a three-part series that lays out the basics of lenses for novices and those who could use a refresher. In this part of the Lens Primer, Larry Becker, of Kelby Media, explores concepts such as aperture, image stabilization (IS) or vibration reduction (VR), and telephoto zoom lenses versus primes.

0
Share
2 years ago
Tips and Solutions

In this video from B&H, Larry Becker offers a basic introduction to the challenges of, and solutions for, shooting in low light with a DSLR or mirrorless camera. He explains ISO sensitivity, shutter speed and aperture settings and demonstrates how simple in-camera adjustments will provide marked improvements when shooting indoors.

0
Share
2 years ago
Tips and Solutions

The number of fast, wide aperture prime optics we carry at B&H has grown over the past year, and in a market that has become increasingly populated by slower, variable-aperture zooms, this is encouraging news.

6
Share
2 years ago
Hands-on Review

Olympus has just announced a new addition to the Micro Four Thirds system, the M.ZUIKO Digital 17mm f/1.8 lens. This lens offers a 35mm equivalent focal length of 34mm, giving it a slighter wider-than-normal angle of view that is ideal for general everyday use.

0
Share
2 years ago
News

It’s interesting to note how many photographers, even advanced shooters, are mistakenly under the impression that the depth of field (DOF) of a variable-aperture zoom lens changes in relation to the effective aperture of the lens as you zoom toward the telephoto end of the optic’s zoom range.

12
Share
3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

White balance is the nearest digital equivalent to “daylight film stock” or “tungsten film stock.” The actual response of the image sensor to light is designed and fixed at the point of manufacturing, so adjustments for white balance are done electronically.

by Anonymous |
0
Share
4 years ago
Buying Guide