color temperature

Light Meters

Light meters work by measuring the ambient or reflected light levels within the area you plan on photographing. Using medium gray, or 18% gray as a reference point, the meter takes this information and converts it to a combination of shutter speeds and lens-aperture openings. 

Use Daylight White Balance for Outdoor Shooting, Not AWB

Auto white balance sounds like it solves every issue regarding colors in your pictures, but it doesn't. For example, when you shoot at sunset or sunrise, AWB wants to 'correct' the golden tones that we love so much when the sun is close to the horizon. It desaturates the yellow and red portion of the spectrum, and the colors look weak and disappointing. By contrast, if you shoot with daylight white balance, you will capture the colors you see. The yellows, reds, and oranges will be saturated and dramatic.




Shooting in Winter Light

Winter is filled with contradictions. The air is cold, yet despite the bite in the air, visually, everything always has a warm tinge to it. Even at high noon—assuming you can call it "high" noon, when the sun is barely above the treetops, the air has an egg-shell quality to it. It's called... winter light.

Why Do I Need a Meter?

So you've dropped a few thousand on your HD video camera and you're doing fine with the onboard monitor for the small productions that represent the bulk of your business. Why do you need a meter?

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