digital

ND-Grad Filters in the Digital Age

When I started out in photography shooting slide film, I was trained to carry two "mandatory" filters: a polarizer and a set of graduated neutral density filters (ND-grads). Polarizing filters not only increase contrast in skies, but they are indispensible in removing glare and reflections from water and foliage. ND-grad filters offer a way of compressing tones in scenes with a large dynamic range.




Field of View: How Your Lens and Sensor Collaborate

"Get a 50mm lens." That is a statement that many photographers will tell you. But do they mean a 50mm lens or the equivalent of a 50mm lens on your camera? Make no mistake, a 50mm lens is a 50mm lens, but sensors have magnification and crop factors depending on your camera model.

A Brief Introduction to ISO

You've probably heard of the term ISO before. But do you know what it means? If someone told you that you need to raise your ISO settings to compensate for the diminished light, would you know what they're talking about? If you don't know, here is a quick guide, straight from the EDU Advantage Team.





Using Contrast Masks

A contrast mask is one of the most useful processing techniques I know of. Many people seem unaware of the technique. It's very easy to learn and to apply.



Print Longevity: A History

Insuring the longevity of a print is essential to an image-maker’s responsibility to the customer. Anything less can cause damage to a studio’s reputation. This is especially true of photographers who cover special events in people’s lives. It would be a sad situation if the wedding photos, which were expected to be handed down from generation to generation, begin to fade after just a few years.

A Future Without Photos

In my parent's house are boxes of family photos stored in closets, cupboards, and desks. The pictures are loose, in albums, and some still in the sleeves they came back from the photomat in. From time to time when I still lived at home I'd pull the boxes out and sort through all the memories of my childhood, and from the years before I was born: photos of my parent's when they were dating, their childhoods, their parents and their childhoods. A visual family history. Some might call this clutter - but I prefer to think of these boxes as tangible memories.

The Spy Plane and the Leica M

 There was a terrific article in the New York Times recently (3/22/10) about the U-2 spy plane, and how it’s still going strong after 50-plus years of service. Designed by Lockheed Corporation’s fabled ‘Skunk Works’ division and placed in service in 1956, the U-2 was our airborne spy-in-the-sky on the then-growing Soviet menace. While reading about how 32 out of the original 86 U-2s produced by the military are still in active service, I couldn’t help thinking about the Leica M3, a camera introduced 2 years earlier that like the U-2, still delivers the goods in a package that - at least on the surface - appears little changed over the course of 5 decades. But nothing could be further from the truth.

Introduction to A/V Receivers

Surround Sound

At the heart of the receiver is the surround-sound processor. The most basic surround processors use a Dolby Pro Logic II decoder. Pro Logic II is a "matrix" system that takes an encoded two-channel stereo signal and converts it to a five-channel full bandwidth (range) playback (Left/Center/Right/Left Surround/Right Surround),resulting in a surround experience. Most TV shows are encoded in Dolby Pro Logic II, as are the majority of VHS videos. You can also play DVDs through a Pro Logic II only-receiver because DVD players can synthesize a Pro Logic II signal that mimics a surround soundtrack. The newer Dolby Pro Logic IIx adds the ability of converting stereo or 5.1-channel surround sound for seamless 6.1 or 7.1 playback.

Subscribe to RSS - digital