filters

Features

Your camera's built-in flash is designed to replicate neutral color in your photographs, which means when you take pictures of Uncle Jake and Aunt Millie, their skin-tone shouldn't foretell a looming case of food poisoning or festering liver condition. But sometimes you need a break from the visual comfort of neutrality, and that's where Sticky Filters come into the picture (pun unintended, but I'm running with it anyway).

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2 years ago
News

Filters—the type you hold between fingers for placing in front of a lens—have been in retreat since in-camera digital effects began offering more choices than a diner menu. Still, there is something refreshing about a snap-on dial for an iPhone 4 or 4S that lets you rotate a selection of filters and lenses.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

If you ask most consumer-camera owners why they keep a filter on their lens, a majority will most likely reply, “For protection.” Although filters do, in fact, protect the surface of your lens against dust, moisture and the occasional thumb print, the primary function of lens filters is really to improve the image quality of the pictures you take—depending on the filter you’re using and how you use it—in a variety of obvious and not-so-obvious ways.

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2 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Deciding what to include and what not to include in your camera bag when planning a trip is part art, part science and part ego. The ego part comes into play when you insist on taking a 500mm f/4 lens along with you, despite the fact you know it's far too heavy to drag around all day.

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

With the exception of the filters used for black-and-white photography (see the article Black & White Landscape Photography) the numbers of filters used for capturing color landscapes are few, mostly due to the fact that, in digital imaging, many white balance and filter effects can be addressed in camera.

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Though I was raised and grazed on film I have no qualms admitting I haven’t shot a roll of the stuff since August 2001 (with a Nikon N90 and Fujifilm Astia in case you’re curious). I appreciate film, respect film and certainly miss the disciplined aspects of shooting film, but at the end of the day I’m perfectly happy with digital imaging, warts and all. 

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Seascapes are about sky, water, the physical dynamics of the points at which they meet, reflections and mirror imaging and most of all, the unique qualities of moisture-filtered light that one can only find where sky meets water.

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3 years ago
News

When I started out in photography shooting slide film, I was trained to carry two "mandatory" filters: a polarizer and a set of graduated neutral density filters (ND-grads). Polarizing filters not only increase contrast in skies, but they are indispensible in removing glare and reflections from water and foliage. ND-grad filters offer a way of compressing tones in scenes with a large dynamic range.




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3 years ago
Buying Guide

While many "looks" can be achieved in post-production, certain aspects of the image are better controlled before the image is recorded. Optical filters modify the light before it enters the lens. The benefit of using optical filters instead of digital filters is that there is no added time in post production and less degradation of the image quality, especially in HDSLRs, which already have limited color space and a highly compressed image.

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By Anonymous |
3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Not all that long ago, if you mentioned photographic filters to the amateur photographer it was assumed you were talking about traditional glass filters, specifically the round type that screws into the front of the lens.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

The Bokeh Masters Kit  contains 21 pre-cut circular templates that enable you to add unique and playful shapes to the out-of-focus highlights in your photographs, especially when used with point light sources such as street lights, spot lights and candles.

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3 years ago
Hands-on Review

Your camera's built-in flash is designed to replicate neutral color in your photographs, which means when you take pictures of Uncle Jake and Aunt Millie, their skin tone shouldn't foretell a looming case of food poisoning or festering liver condition. 

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4 years ago

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