gear

Photography: It Is—and Isn’t—About the Gear

I'd been saving for months and months, which seemed like a lifetime, and I didn’t even have a driver’s license yet. I’d given my savings to my dad to pick it up early that day. I sat in class, and the clock seemed to be going in reverse. I had a volleyball tournament after school, but I hoped my dad would show up before the whistle. The match started, then the second game, and then the third, yet I didn’t see him. Then, in the fourth game I saw him come in with a brown paper bag, and take a seat next to Sharon. That just killed me—not sitting next to Sharon—but knowing that in that bag was basically my life's savings. Wouldn’t you know it? We tied up the match and went into overtime. That I was spiking with all my might goes without saying. Finally, with the last serve, an ace, the match was over, and before anything else, I ran over to the bleachers. He handed me the paper bag with a big smile. I opened it, and inside I saw that brand new Minolta 200 f4 lens I’d been saving so long for. I was in love!

Editor's Note: This is a guest blog post from Moose Peterson

“Road Warrior 101” for the photographer (part one of two)

I have been making photographs seriously since 1972, when I fell in love with photography during an intro to photography class in high school.  I have been taking pictures for money since 1980, when I graduated from college after studying the history of photography. 



New Toys, Old Strategies

Like most photographers, I have a love-hate relationship with the tools I use. I am as captivated as the next photographer by the promise of the newest cameras, yet I am loath to give up old strategies that have served me so well. As a photographer, I depend on my cameras to make the pictures I want to make. As a professional, I depend on that same gear to earn my living.

Subscribe to RSS - gear