Holiday Gift Guides

Buying Guide

Sooner or later the kids fly the coop, you find yourself an "empty-nester" and there you are with an attic filled with tchotchkes you know you'll never use again. Even if you haven't reached that stage in your life, there's another school of thought that says if you own more than 100 things, you've got too much. Ring any bells? If so, it's time to set up a  tchotchke-shooting table, photograph the stuff and sell it online because you know somebody out there is desperately looking for all those gewgaws you've been tripping over.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

The interesting thing about entry level point-and-shoot digicams is that the simplest, least expensive of the lot is capable of taking wonderfully sharp, angst-free photographs. The costlier, more "'complicated" digicams can perform more "tricks" or have wider or longer lenses  than entry-level digicams, but at the end of the day, each of these econo-cams capture surprisingly fine stills and video.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

Not long ago, point-and-shoot cameras had zoom lenses that seldom went beyond the optical range of a 35-105mm lens on a conventional 35mm camera. Not so anymore. Thanks to numerous advancements in optical technologies, digicams now feature 8x to 14x zooms that despite their 20-something to 200-300mm-plus focal ranges, still slip easily into your pocket. In addition to HD video, some perform some pretty neat tricks.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

Professionals tend to expect more from the tools they use. They expect them to perform reliably, accurately and smoothly on good days and bad. On top of all that, they expect their tools to feel proper, secure and "right" in the hand. And these very same folk often have the same expectations when it comes to pedestrian items. We'd like to talk about a half-dozen point-and-shoot digital cameras that should appeal to serious-minded shooters seeking a pocket-sized camera that feels and performs like a "real" camera.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

While there may not ever be a "perfect" lens, there has long been a need for a one-lens solution for shooters who want to head out the door with one camera and one lens over their shoulder. The reasons vary. For some it's a matter of convenience. For some, it's a matter of pure laziness and for others it's the fear of getting dust on the sensor. For frequent flyers it's a matter of logistics, i.e., there's a limit to how much airlines allow you  to carry aboard the plane (almost all of these lenses are surprisingly compact).

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2 years ago
News

For many DSLR owners, there comes a time when one wants to go beyond the kit lens that came with the camera. The reasons vary. For some it's a matter of sharpness. For others it's a matter of speed and/or focal-length restrictions. And for some it's simply the fact they don't like the ''icky" feel of a plastic lens barrel, regardless of how sharp the lens may or may not be.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

Regardless of the focal length of your favorite lens, I'd venture to say you've been in situations where you've tried to focus in tight on your subject and inevitably hit the wall—the minimum focus point of your lens. Sure you can crop, but in a perfect world it would be swell if each of our lenses would focus as close to our subjects as our mind's eye focuses. Alas, the world isn't perfect... but we do have macro lenses.

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2 years ago
Hands-on Review

With built-in learning features and hundreds of onboard tones, rhythms and songs, these inexpensive keyboards offer a fun way for students and enthusiasts of all ages to learn to play.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

These players make streaming movies, videos, photos and music from the Net to your TV or nightstand fun.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

You’ve got a lot of options these days when it comes to shooting video. You can shoot video with a multimedia phone, or you can opt for the convenience and decent image quality of a shoot-and-share camera like the Flip, or you can even shoot video with your digital camera. All of these options are great when you just want to capture a moment and maybe post it quickly to YouTube, but when you want more quality and a few more bells and whistles, your best option is still a handy, compact camcorder. 

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2 years ago
Hands-on Review

Here are several pieces of video gear available from B&H that add great production value to the work of any videographer—without breaking the bank.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

Professional photographic gear and other electronic equipment is expensive and delicate. But you already knew that. When you’re carrying your own gear you can afford to be as careful with it as possible. But once you hand off your gear to someone else—airport baggage handlers, limo drivers, overnight couriers, and the like—the only thing safeguarding your gear is the case you put it in. If you have anything worth protecting you should do it the way the pros do—with Pelican hard cases.


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4 years ago
Buying Guide

The movement from 35mm to digital sensors in compact cameras has done more than simply make it possible to instantly review and share your photos. It’s also changed the way cameras are designed. Because the sensors used in today’s compact cameras are much smaller than a frame of film, lenses can also be much smaller and cover longer zoom ranges than ever were possible with film.


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4 years ago
Buying Guide

MiniDV camcorders still offer many benefits, not to mention the terrific quality of the video they capture. Sticking with MiniDV is a no-brainer if you already have a lot of time and money invested in the format. B&H still carries the most popular MiniDV models at the best prices you’ll find anywhere.

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4 years ago

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