landscape

Tips and Solutions

How many times have you heard, “Oh, what a beautiful day, not a cloud in the sky!”? Those are the days my camera and I stay home and watch TV. (My camera likes to watch Travels to the Edge with Art Wolfe; he gets to see his cousins.) Being a landscape photographer, I can’t think of anything more boring than a cloudless sky. Clouds add so much interest to almost any scene, that it really isn’t worth venturing out when they aren’t there.

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1 year ago
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We can all appreciate the beloved Ansel Adams. He was one of the greats. His story is inspiring, fascinating and enduring. The man worked as a custodian in Yosemite National Park in order to live in the beauty he so much appreciated and desired to record. He seemed a harmonious blend of romantic artist and master technician. He devoted his life to the pursuit of what he loved. As a darkroom junkie myself, the first time I saw an Ansel print in person, printed by his own hands, I admit that a tear, (yes, a tear) fell down my face. The sheer craftsmanship of his prints was surprisingly moving. I am not here to dispute the fact that Ansel Adams was one of America’s greatest and seminal landscape photographers. I am here, however, to challenge you to find another one. After Ansel, who is your favorite photographer?

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1 year ago
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The photo above is quite a striking one, and we recently featured it on our Facebook wall. It was shot by Mike Finn, a photo enthusiast who loves to create awesome scenes. After closely inspecting the photo, we thought it would be great to ask him how it was created.

Can you take a guess? We talked to Mike about how he created it. Here's how.

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2 years ago
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Eliot Dudik is a documentary, fine art, and landscape photographer who has made PDN's 30 for 2012. His project, 'Road Ends in Water,' documents communities that live along the waterside in South Carolina. The project ended with the creation and publishing of a book of the photos.

Eliot spoke to us recently about what it's like to be included in the PDN 30, and about the project.

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2 years ago
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Take a look at the photo above: Adam Schallau was able to capture this gorgeous image by releasing the shutter at just the right time. But how did he get it? We talked to Adam about what he did to achieve it.

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2 years ago
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Landscape photography is such a romantic pursuit! Though it is so close to many of our hearts, the romance of landscape photography gets pushed aside too often by its technical and procedural aspects. Yet, without that technical stuff, it’s really hard to bring out the romance. With that in mind, I created what I think are the top ten ideas for techniques that you can use easily, so you can focus in on the romance. These top tips can work anywhere, but with the current interest in my ancestral home of Bodie, I was asked to act as your photographic guide to this very Western ghost town.

The key to making any top-ten-ideas list work is to latch on to only those that fit your style of photography, and forget the rest. The next thing you want to do is think through these ideas with the camera gear you own. You might find that some suit the job perfectly, while others end up being the odd lens out. And more than likely, you’ll find you’ll need to acquire a new lens. That is all part of the process, and the more you explore it, the better your photography will become, the greater the romance will become, and the more enthralling will be your storytelling. Let’s get to the list.

Editor's Note: This is a guest blogpost by Moose Peterson.

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2 years ago
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BHInsights blogger David Wells has been a busy man! He was recently on an assignment that tasked him to photograph the historically-significant Islamic architecture in Bijapur, in the Southern Indian state of Karnataka, for Saudi Aramco World Magazine. They were quite tedious to get to, since there is no commercial airport in Bijapur, and during the short window of time that he had for the shoot, no trains could be found from Mumbai, to get him to and from that city with enough time to do the kind of photography he was expected to do.

Capturing the photo above was not only quite a physical task, but also required lots of knowledge and understanding of exposures and metering. Here's David Wells, explaining how he got the shot:

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2 years ago
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Every now and then, we will give the spotlight to select photos from our awesome fans posted on our Facebook. Troy Shinn's photo above was recently selected, and it received an outpouring of love from amongst our other followers.

We were so awe-struck by it, that we asked Troy to share with us how he shot it. Here's Troy's story.

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2 years ago
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Kelby Training's Education Director Matt Kloskowski photographed the stunning sunrise in his photo above. Capturing all of the details in one image like this can be a bit tough to do, but it is totally possible through various methods. How do you think Matt shot it? After being captivated by it, we talked to Matt about how he photographed it.

Take a guess, then read on, to see if you got it right.

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2 years ago
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When I was first learning photography, I was often disappointed by my images. I’d go to a beautiful place, and take many photographs. Later, when I’d examine the results on the monitor, I’d find that what had been so appealing in person wasn’t captured by the camera. Sound familiar?

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2 years ago
Features

I’ve been intrigued by the iPhone photography of Dan Burkholder and others. I love the weathered look, and the apps are getting quite cogent, enabling us to create large files for print. Now, by large files, we’re not talking 20x30 inches, but we can certainly make up to 13x19-inch prints, that can have a fine art, abstract and saleable look.

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2 years ago
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Every experienced photographer knows and fears lens flare. Most often, we associate it with those horribly distracting 'stars' of light we see through our viewfinder and in our images when shooting into the sun. But not everyone knows that lens flare doesn't only affect those shots—it is part of every image we capture. So knowing how to reduce its effect is a valuable tool in many shooting situations.


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2 years ago
Features

We need to be on the lookout for photographs that aren't yet available, but soon may be. 

We get a good composition when the right combination of subject matter and light coalesces in the viewfinder. Subjects are often moving. Light is often changing. We need to be thinking ahead to avoid missing shots.


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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

High-dynamic range imaging (HDR) is the fastest growing and perhaps the trendiest new technique in photography. By combining several images with different exposures the photographer can capture scenes which are beyond the dynamic range of their camera. The trick is that HDR scenes not only can't be captured in a single image, they also can't be fully displayed or printed in their native form. That means additional processing is required to turn the photo into one which can be used.

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3 years ago
Features

I was traveling six hundred feet down and a thousand years back, more or less. The trail from the rim of Canyon de Chelly to the White House Ruin begins with a series of steep switchbacks. On one side, there's a wall of rock. On the other side, if you're clumsy, there's a fall that's long enough to kill you. I watched my step.





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3 years ago

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