neutral density filters

Hands-on Review

Not long ago, filters were part and parcel of any worthwhile camera system. If you wanted to warm up the palette of a dreary day, you used a filter. Ditto for converting daylight to tungsten light, tungsten to daylight, and daylight to (or from) fluorescent lights.

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1 year ago
News

Singh-Ray recently introduced their most substantial, long-exposure-inducing solid neutral density filter ever: the Mor-Slo ND 10-Stop Filter. This optically dense filter provides a highly effective reduction in exposure, allowing you to utilize larger apertures or longer shutter speeds for greater control in bright conditions.

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1 year ago
Tips and Solutions

This video from B&H surveys various optical filter options for video production. Mia McCormick discusses the basics of neutral density filters, circular polarizing filters, UV filters and soft effect filters. You’ll learn about the unique benefits of using an optical filter during the capture process—benefits which cannot be replicated in post production.

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2 years ago
Hands-on Review

Way back—five years ago—if you shot video, you used a video camera, and if you shot photographs, you used a still camera. Today, that distinction is all but meaningless. Almost every video camera today captures stills, and virtually every still camera now shoots video.

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2 years ago
Tips and Solutions

As a working photographer, the center of the universe is your camera bag and its contents. Your cameras and lenses are the tools of your trade. As you may have noted, both are mentioned in plural because just as you wouldn’t jump out of an airplane without a backup parachute, you shouldn’t attempt to photograph an emotionally spiked, non-repeatable event armed with only one camera.

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2 years ago
Buying Guide

If you ask most consumer-camera owners why they keep a filter on their lens, a majority will most likely reply, “For protection.” Although filters do, in fact, protect the surface of your lens against dust, moisture and the occasional thumb print, the primary function of lens filters is really to improve the image quality of the pictures you take—depending on the filter you’re using and how you use it—in a variety of obvious and not-so-obvious ways.

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2 years ago
Tips and Solutions

With the exception of the filters used for black-and-white photography (see the article Black & White Landscape Photography) the numbers of filters used for capturing color landscapes are few, mostly due to the fact that, in digital imaging, many white balance and filter effects can be addressed in camera.

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Seascapes are about sky, water, the physical dynamics of the points at which they meet, reflections and mirror imaging and most of all, the unique qualities of moisture-filtered light that one can only find where sky meets water.

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3 years ago
Features

I recently was able to talk to Michael Freeman about photographing better sunsets. Admittedly, I can't do this for the life of me, and have always found photographing people to be much easier. Michael is the author of the first three books in the Focal Press Field Guide series: The Photographer’s Eye Field Guide, The DSLR Field Guide and The Exposure Field Guide.



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3 years ago
Buying Guide

While many "looks" can be achieved in post-production, certain aspects of the image are better controlled before the image is recorded. Optical filters modify the light before it enters the lens. The benefit of using optical filters instead of digital filters is that there is no added time in post production and less degradation of the image quality, especially in HDSLRs, which already have limited color space and a highly compressed image.

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By Anonymous |
3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Not all that long ago, if you mentioned photographic filters to the amateur photographer it was assumed you were talking about traditional glass filters, specifically the round type that screws into the front of the lens.

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3 years ago