Olympus

How to Choose the Lens That's Right for You

A question we hear often at B&H is, "What lens should I buy?" We may follow up with, "What are you going to shoot with it?" The reason for this is because different lenses are meant for different shooting situations. Here are a few things to keep in mind when choosing a lens (or lenses) for your camera system.

Professional Images with a Point-and-Shoot

Like many of you, I don't always like to shoot with my DSLR, because of how bulky and heavy it can be. Sometimes, I just want a good point-and-shoot. But to get a really good photo, lighting is so important. I'm a big lover of strobist techniques, so using them with a point-and-shoot was always something that I wanted to test out a bit.

Olympus XZ-1 Camera

In this video we review the Olympus XZ-1, an advanced point-and-shoot camera with the fastest lens in its class: an i.Zuiko f/1.8.This is the first time Olympus has incorporated a Zuiko lens into a point-and-shoot camera. They were only featured previously on DSLRs.

Olympus VG-120 Digital Camera

The Olympus VG120 is a 14MP point-and-shoot camera with a 5x zoom lens and 720p HD video. This Olympus camera features Magic filters to give your photos a fun, unique look. The digital filter group consists of seven filters: Sparkle, Punk, Fisheye, Pinhole, Pop Art, Soft Focus and Drawing.

UV Filter or No UV Filter: Can You Tell the Difference?

There is an old saying amongst some photographers that using a UV filter will degrade the quality of your image. But is it really true? We put that to the test recently in the B&H Executive Offices. We'd like to know, in the comments below, if you can tell the difference between the two images, and tell us which one was shot with a filter and which one wasn't.


Stealthy Cameras for Stealthy People

Why be a fly on the wall at an event or wedding, when you can be a ninja? There are many photographers that love to be stealthy in their own ways. If you'd like to learn the ways of the ninja photographer, then check out these cameras to help you get started.



Mid-Level DSLR

When categorizing the many DSLRs we carry at B&H into three groups—entry level, midrange and professional— there are some models that, depending on their attributes, price points or your point of view, fall into more than one camp. Our selection of mid-range DSLRs is no exception. You can call them "Mid-Range" cameras, but a few of them are well up to the challenge of full-time pro shooting.

Beyond the Kit Lens

For many DSLR owners, there comes a time when one wants to go beyond the kit lens that came with the camera. The reasons vary. For some it's a matter of sharpness. For others it's a matter of speed and/or focal-length restrictions. And for some it's simply the fact they don't like the ''icky" feel of a plastic lens barrel, regardless of how sharp the lens may or may not be.

All-in-Ones

While there may not ever be a "perfect" lens, there has long been a need for a one-lens solution for shooters who want to head out the door with one camera and one lens over their shoulder. The reasons vary. For some it's a matter of convenience. For some, it's a matter of pure laziness and for others it's the fear of getting dust on the sensor. For frequent flyers it's a matter of logistics, i.e., there's a limit to how much airlines allow you  to carry aboard the plane (almost all of these lenses are surprisingly compact).

Entry-Level Cameras

The interesting thing about entry level point-and-shoot digicams is that the simplest, least expensive of the lot is capable of taking wonderfully sharp, angst-free photographs. The costlier, more "'complicated" digicams can perform more "tricks" or have wider or longer lenses  than entry-level digicams, but at the end of the day, each of these econo-cams capture surprisingly fine stills and video.

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