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Autumn: an appropriate time to be thinking and writing about cycles. The garden is fully formed, yielding all that it has to offer. The mornings are cooler with the smell of crisp change perched on the air, and once again, my thoughts turn to another year. Another year of productivity, highs, lows, little celebrations and small defeats. Each year brings better understanding of the way I work and the work that I do now, potential uncertainty about the work to come, and acceptance of the work that's been done. And the crux here is that it is all connected.



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3 years ago
Features

Shooting the same projects and ideas regularly can become stale. One way to find creative inspiration is by browsing through Flickr and the work of other photographers. If you're still craving a sip of those creative juices, here's a quick list of some alternative project ideas that you may not have worked on.


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3 years ago
Features

When you shoot the highest-profile weddings in New York City and the world, you better know how to place your subjects in the best light possible. Andy Marcus has been in the business of photographing weddings for over 40 years. He has steadily built up his reputation as the photographer to use in the New York area.



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3 years ago
Features

If you're selling used gear online, there is no reason why you shouldn't have photos that effectively showcase your item. Here are several budget-friendly items, and some tips on how to create professional-quality photos which stand out from the rest.



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3 years ago
Features

We need to be on the lookout for photographs that aren't yet available, but soon may be. 

We get a good composition when the right combination of subject matter and light coalesces in the viewfinder. Subjects are often moving. Light is often changing. We need to be thinking ahead to avoid missing shots.


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3 years ago
Features

Pittsburgh-based photographer Tom Persinger's latest photographic project "Encountering Space: The Fire Lookouts of Montana" took him into the backcountry of the rugged Rocky Mountains. Working miles away from the nearest road, carrying all of his photographic gear as well as overnight supplies, he made photographs of the people who staff fire lookout towers, and the majestic scenery in which they're isolated for days at a time.


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3 years ago
Features

For years, many photographers shot with almost exclusively with their trusty 50mm. The reason for this is the image quality combined with overall versatility of this focal length. It is often said that the 50mm perspective on 35mm film/digital closely mimics what the human eye sees.

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3 years ago
News

When people think of traveling for scuba diving, they think of warm blue water locations such as the Red Sea, Australia, Fuji, the Bahamas, Grand Cayman, Cozumel, and Bonaire. But Alaska? The green rich waters of this temperate rain forest are full of life and photographic opportunities. A trip to Alaska is a true adventure, both above and below the surface. My dive buddy Olga Torrey and I decided to experience Alaska on the liveaboard dive boat, the Nautilus Swell. This 100-year-old refurbished tugboat is the perfect platform for cold-water exploration, and is very photographer-friendly. The crew is well versed in dive procedures in this very different environment. We would board the boat in Juneau, and after a week of diving, we would depart from Sitka.

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3 years ago
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When I started out in photography shooting slide film, I was trained to carry two "mandatory" filters: a polarizer and a set of graduated neutral density filters (ND-grads). Polarizing filters not only increase contrast in skies, but they are indispensible in removing glare and reflections from water and foliage. ND-grad filters offer a way of compressing tones in scenes with a large dynamic range.




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3 years ago
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Have you ever looked at photographs and wondered how they were lit? Strobist diagrams can help after the fact, but what about before: how do you know how to get the look you want? Consider a cinematography technique: lighting your scene one light at a time.







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3 years ago
News

On a recent photo safari with the B&H Event Space, we pulled random people off the streets of NYC for quick photoshoots with attendees. Throughout, I noticed timidness in many photographers while shooting portraits of people they didn't know. Your fears are going to hold you back from creating better portraits. If you can adjust your thinking a bit, and internalize some basic principles, you'll be shooting with confidence regularly. Here are a couple of tips to rid yourself of your fears.


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3 years ago
News

Back in college, I learned a term in cinematography class: Mise-en-scene. To sum it up in short, Mise-en-Scene is everything that goes in front of the camera (or affects it) in that particular scene. It has to do with various elements such as the lighting, costumes, backgrounds, foregrounds, positioning, props, etc. Then it hit me: If film crews put so much effort into storyboarding to make sure that everything is perfect, why don't most photographers apply that same careful effort to photography?

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3 years ago
News

Do you remember the first time you looked up at the sky and witnessed a spectacular fireworks show? Well now that you're a bit older, you can capture the lightshow with your camera. You'll be glad to know that it's not extremely tough to do this, providing that you do a couple of things correctly. Here are some tips on how to capture better photos of fireworks for the 4th of July or for any special occasion.

Note: Some of the photos in this posting were pulled from the B&H Photo Flickr Group. If you haven't submitted to it, show us what you've got!

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3 years ago
Features

I recently was able to talk to Michael Freeman about photographing better sunsets. Admittedly, I can't do this for the life of me, and have always found photographing people to be much easier. Michael is the author of the first three books in the Focal Press Field Guide series: The Photographer’s Eye Field Guide, The DSLR Field Guide and The Exposure Field Guide.



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3 years ago
Features

Not long ago, we spent some time with famed wedding photographer and guest blogger Ryan Brenizer. One of the reasons why Ryan is famous is because of his unique style of shooting portraits known across the net as the Brenizer Method. Ryan talked with us about the gear he uses to do it, how he came up with the idea, the post-production phase, and also gave us some tips for beginners. Take a look at the video after clicking Read and Discuss.

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3 years ago

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