Photography

News

Have you ever looked at photographs and wondered how they were lit? Strobist diagrams can help after the fact, but what about before: how do you know how to get the look you want? Consider a cinematography technique: lighting your scene one light at a time.







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3 years ago
News

On a recent photo safari with the B&H Event Space, we pulled random people off the streets of NYC for quick photoshoots with attendees. Throughout, I noticed timidness in many photographers while shooting portraits of people they didn't know. Your fears are going to hold you back from creating better portraits. If you can adjust your thinking a bit, and internalize some basic principles, you'll be shooting with confidence regularly. Here are a couple of tips to rid yourself of your fears.


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3 years ago
News

Back in college, I learned a term in cinematography class: Mise-en-scene. To sum it up in short, Mise-en-Scene is everything that goes in front of the camera (or affects it) in that particular scene. It has to do with various elements such as the lighting, costumes, backgrounds, foregrounds, positioning, props, etc. Then it hit me: If film crews put so much effort into storyboarding to make sure that everything is perfect, why don't most photographers apply that same careful effort to photography?

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3 years ago
News

Do you remember the first time you looked up at the sky and witnessed a spectacular fireworks show? Well now that you're a bit older, you can capture the lightshow with your camera. You'll be glad to know that it's not extremely tough to do this, providing that you do a couple of things correctly. Here are some tips on how to capture better photos of fireworks for the 4th of July or for any special occasion.

Note: Some of the photos in this posting were pulled from the B&H Photo Flickr Group. If you haven't submitted to it, show us what you've got!

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3 years ago
Features

I recently was able to talk to Michael Freeman about photographing better sunsets. Admittedly, I can't do this for the life of me, and have always found photographing people to be much easier. Michael is the author of the first three books in the Focal Press Field Guide series: The Photographer’s Eye Field Guide, The DSLR Field Guide and The Exposure Field Guide.



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3 years ago
Features

Not long ago, we spent some time with famed wedding photographer and guest blogger Ryan Brenizer. One of the reasons why Ryan is famous is because of his unique style of shooting portraits known across the net as the Brenizer Method. Ryan talked with us about the gear he uses to do it, how he came up with the idea, the post-production phase, and also gave us some tips for beginners. Take a look at the video after clicking Read and Discuss.

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3 years ago
Features

Auto white balance sounds like it solves every issue regarding colors in your pictures, but it doesn't. For example, when you shoot at sunset or sunrise, AWB wants to 'correct' the golden tones that we love so much when the sun is close to the horizon. It desaturates the yellow and red portion of the spectrum, and the colors look weak and disappointing. By contrast, if you shoot with daylight white balance, you will capture the colors you see. The yellows, reds, and oranges will be saturated and dramatic.




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3 years ago
Features

The weather’s getting warmer and there’s a faint smell of cake in the air, which can only mean one thing…wedding season is right around the corner! But are you prepared?



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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

The second most-asked question I receive from photographers is, "How did you start your journey as a wedding photographer?" I photographed three weddings in October of 2006, then shot 38 weddings in 2007...all without formal training or money. When I began, I dared myself to dream and fail. My husband, JD, and I planned that I'd give this whole photography thing a try for one year, and if it didn't work, I'd go back and reclaim my scholarship to law school.



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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

From the very first time we pick up our cameras, we discover the importance of focusing on the main subject. It’s one of those intuitive bedrock foundations of Photo 101 and it becomes ingrained in our brains as an essential rule that we live by for the rest of our lives. Specifically, we learn that when shooting people or animals, we generally want to land the point of sharp focus right on the eyes. 



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3 years ago
Features

Are your photos featured this week? Read more to see this week's selection from our B&H Photo Flickr Group. If you haven't joined already, what are you waiting for?




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3 years ago
Features

What other store has a photography counter the width of nearly a city block? For those of you that have never been to the B&H Photo Video SuperStore, our second floor features a giant counter staffed by many experts that are ready to answer questions and fulfill your orders. Click Read and Discuss and take a look at the photos. If you've ever been to the Photography Counter, please share your thoughts with us on what you think.

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3 years ago
Features

Everyone loves a good joke and sometimes there isn't a reason to be so serious. There are great ways to prank photographers that are creative yet simple to pull off. Here are a couple of pranks that you can play. In the comments below, let us know what type of shenanigans you would pull.

Photo by Araakii from the B&H Photo Flickr Group

Disclaimer: we don't recommend doing this unless you know for a fact that the photographer has a sense of humor.

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3 years ago
Features

For those of you that have never visited the B&H SuperStore, you're in luck. Each week we'll feature photos of a different department or section in order for you to get to know us a bit better. This week, we are showing off the Film Counter located on the first floor. We sell many different types of film for different purposes, formats, etc. The film counter has shrunk over the years with the rise of digital photography; but we probably still sell as much film as any other store out there.


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3 years ago
Features

Today marks the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day, a time of year to recognize women throughout history and today, all around the world. While the photo industry is still dominated by men, women have made tremendous progress over the last several years by breaking new ground across multiple genres, and excelling in a myriad of photo professions. Since its inception, the B&H Event Space has invited talented women to speak about their photography and their path towards success. In honor of International Women’s Day, the Event Space will be hosting a panel of women photographers to discuss the methods, subject matter, personal vision, and processes used for creating their extraordinary bodies of work.

The date of the panel is Sunday, March 27th, 1pm-4pm, and will include Amy Stein, Cara Phillips, Jane Tam, Ellen Carey, and will be moderated by Karen Marshall. Full details are here: Women in Photography: A Panel Discussion and Slideshow.

Who are your favorite women photographers? Leave your comments below.

(Photo courtesy of j3net )

 
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3 years ago

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