podcast

Features

If you've ever searched the web to determine the proper use of a semicolon, or to figure out the difference between "affect" and "effect," then you've likely encountered Ms. Mignon Fogarty, who is better known as Grammar Girl. What's become a media empire started out as a humble, five-minute grammar podcast. One individual with a microphone, an internet connection and a dream. B&H Insights caught up with Mignon to find out how she got her start, how she developed her network, and what she envisions for the future.

0
Share
1 year ago
Tips and Solutions

The giant balloons in the Thanksgiving Day Parade cry out to be seen on a big screen. The roar of a football game shouts surround sound. Classic holiday movies demand to be seen anew in high definition. And home videos and digital slide shows of gatherings past signal family members to come to the sofa.

The holidays and home theater were made for each other. After all, when the eating's done, it's then that sports nuts and movie connoisseurs get down to some serious holiday viewing. Unless you're a video equipment enthusiast, though, creating a crowd pleasing system can be as elusive as putting together the perfect black truffle soufflé.

Setting up a home theater isn't difficult once you understand how each component contributes to the big picture. Here's grandma's recipe for what you need – or what someone you know deserves.

One TV Screen

There seem to be as many flat screen choices as boxes in the cereal aisle. Don't despair. Your first choice should be a known brand featuring "Full HD" resolution, meaning if you counted the number of picture elements, you'd find 1920 pixels across and 1080 pixels down. The bigger the screen, the more you'll appreciate the lifelike quality of high definition programs. So, a 40-inch model (measured diagonally) is an entry point, but a 50-incher is even better.

LCD and plasma technologies have become such strong performers that you can't go wrong with either type of TV. One example is the Samsung LN40A650, a 40-inch LCD model. Another is the Panasonic TH-50PZ85U Viera 50-inch plasma HDTV. Both come with built-in stands for placement on furniture, but the stand can be removed if you'd prefer an optional wall mount.

Samsung LN40A650
Samsung LN40A650

0
Share
1 year ago
Buying Guide

The Nikon's D300s is an update of the company's popular D300 digital SLR camera, and like its predecessor, the D300s contains a self-cleaning 12.3Mp DX-format CMOS sensor, a dynamic 51-point Multi-CAM3500 autofocus system, and an EXPEED image processor. It is also notably faster and shoots 720p high-definition video. Wait one minute. Is that an arched eyebrow we detect?

0
Share
1 year ago
Tips and Solutions

The Used Department at B&H Photo's NYC Superstore is larger than most camera stores, and much of the used gear we have in stock isn't even on display. We have what must be the most eclectic assortment of used classics, limited edition, and special purpose cameras you're likely to find in one location. But since many of our best, long-time customers live too far to ever stop by and say 'Hi', we thought we'd write about some of the more interesting items we had on hand at the time of this writing.

0
Share
1 year ago
Tips and Solutions

In my previous article about in-ear headphones, one model that wasn't explored was the SA6 from Sleek Audio, which is a unique offering from a relatively new contender in the headphone world. What's interesting about the SA6 is that it's a completely modular system, and it has customizable treble and bass response. To my knowledge, this is the only pair of in-ear headphones on the market to offer this feature, and it does so at a pretty reasonable price. 

0
Share
1 year ago
Hands-on Review

When aspiring filmmakers watch a Hollywood movie, they don't just see actors, camerawork, editing and effects. They see the dreamy richness of images shot on film. They see a depth of color and space that goes beyond the mantra of "progressive imaging, 24-frames-per-second" so often whispered, siren-like, in their ears.

1
Share
1 year ago
Tips and Solutions


When the average person takes a look at a grid controller, they're likely to think it's a miniature disco dance floor where your fingers can strut like a young John Travolta. Interestingly, this interpretation isn't too far off. Mass produced grid controllers have only been available for a short time and have proved to be a hit, at least for the small niche of people who already had a need for one. If you have no idea what you're supposed to do with a grid controller, that's okay--you're not alone.

2
Share
2 years ago
Tips and Solutions

You may not be aware that B&H Photo regularly creates unique videos that demonstrate features of the products it sells. You'll find the entire library on the B&H Web site at www.video.bhphotovideo.com where, among other options, you can use the Channel Navigator to view programs based on such categories as photo, home entertainment, or computer products.

0
Share
2 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Back in the mid-70s Nikon made a 6/2.8 fisheye lens that captured a 220° circular image, which is 40° wider than the standard-issue 180° fisheyes manufactured today. Weighing in at 11 lbs, it had a front element the shape and size of a small goldfish bowl (9.3") and all-but-dwarfed the Nikon F hanging off the back of it. You could actually see behind the camera. And it could be had for about $13,500 in 1975 Yankee dollars.

Fast forward 35 years and I find myself palming a Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX1, a sub-compact bridge camera with a 9.1Mp Super Exmor CMOS sensor (1/2.4"), full-res burst-rates of up to 10 fps, a 20x Sony G-series optically-stabilized zoom lens, and a long list of features you'd expect to find nowadays on bridge-style digicams.

2
Share
4 years ago
Hands-on Review

Today's competitive market has proven to be a boon for the consumer, since companies like Canon, have been outdoing themselves in improving their products and offering innovations and advanced options in their professional and prosumer line. Today we will talk about the Canon XH-A1s, a compact high definition camera with professional quality, sleek design and important additions from the successful XH-A1.

0
Share
4 years ago
News

Having squeezed more pixels than most of us actually need into DSLRs in every price range, manufacturers are focusing on incorporating cutting-edge features normally reserved for mid and upper-level DSLRs into their less-pricy consumer DSLRs. Nowhere is this clearer than Canon's 6th generation digital Rebel, the EOS Rebel T1i, which is available as body-only or with a Canon 18-55 IS kit lens. 

2
Share
4 years ago
News

Sony has introduced successors to its original line-up of compact, APS-C format DSLRs. The new cameras – the Sony Alpha A230, A330, and A380 – are all housed in polycarbonate bodies that are smaller and have lower profiles than the cameras they replace.

2
Share
4 years ago
Tips and Solutions

Though inexpensive flash memory camcorders have been snapped up by consumers in droves in recent years, even casual users recognize their severe limitations. Typically, these devices offer a lackluster lens, provide only digital zoom, and perform poorly in dim light or an unsteady hand. Manual controls, touch screens, and GPS simply aren't included in the equipment. All this helps explain why cameras that record to tape or hard disks continue to be preferred by home video enthusiasts.

2
Share
4 years ago
Buying Guide

"What type of camera do you use? A studio camera? A sports camera? Pro? Pro-sumer? Entry level?" The discussion of photography has changed dramatically in recent years. Dialogue has shifted from concept and intent to hardware and accessories. This talk is common on the internet, in art departments, even in university classes and photo clubs. But when studying an actual image, something changes. We forget the branding and the specs and the marketing hype. Our consideration of time, value, and life is forever altered. We are reminded in fact, that we are human – not studio human, sports human, professional or entry level. We experience things and, in the click of a shutter, can share those experiences with one another.

3
Share
4 years ago
Tips and Solutions

DSLR video has changed the industry. Over the past year, our photographic sensibilities have propelled the moving image-opening the door to a new realm of storytelling possibilities. For photographers, the form factor is comfortable and familiar. The lens selection? A dream come true. Custom color palettes, high ISO capture, all with a professional esthetic rivaling the production values of major Hollywood productions-how could this not be industry changing? Life changing, even?

5
Share
4 years ago

Pages