\

polarizing filters

Capturing the Romance of Fall Photography

When it comes to romantic seasons, there is only one—fall! The sun dips low and clings to the horizon, and autumn gives way to the coming winter in a final celebration of color. Fall brings all sorts of magic to the photographer. It’s a time of year when, rain or shine, there is great photography at every turn. However, the days of just a red leaf being considered a great photograph are long gone. Embracing and relaying the romance of the season is the challenge.

Editor's Note: this is a guest blog post by Moose Peterson

Holiday 2012: Using Video Filters

This video from B&H surveys various optical filter options for video production. Mia McCormick discusses the basics of neutral density filters, circular polarizing filters, UV filters and soft effect filters. You’ll learn about the unique benefits of using an optical filter during the capture process—benefits which cannot be replicated in post production.

Singh-Ray Filters

Not long ago, filters were part and parcel of any worthwhile camera system. If you wanted to warm up the palette of a dreary day, you used a filter. Ditto for converting daylight to tungsten light, tungsten to daylight, and daylight to (or from) fluorescent lights.

Filters for Landscape Photography

With the exception of the filters used for black-and-white photography (see the article Black & White Landscape Photography) the numbers of filters used for capturing color landscapes are few, mostly due to the fact that, in digital imaging, many white balance and filter effects can be addressed in camera.

HDSLR Guide Chapter 4: Filters

While many "looks" can be achieved in post-production, certain aspects of the image are better controlled before the image is recorded. Optical filters modify the light before it enters the lens. The benefit of using optical filters instead of digital filters is that there is no added time in post production and less degradation of the image quality, especially in HDSLRs, which already have limited color space and a highly compressed image.

Filtering in Real-Time

 In a perfect world you don’t need a filter. Your lens, even the most basic of kit lenses, comes pre-coated to minimize flare and color aberration. And when not in use, every lens comes with a lens cap that protects the front element of your lens and never ever unknowingly falls off your camera as you stroll down the boulevard. But we don’t live in a perfect world so forget about all of the above. (And by the way, I think you just lost your lens cap)

Subscribe to RSS - polarizing filters

Close

Close

Close