raid

Hands-on Review

Sometimes, it seems as if there’s never enough space for your files. As the need for higher-definition audio and video files increases and users become better acquainted with handling these files, you’ll soon find that your computer’s 1TB hard drive is quickly becoming too small.

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1 year ago
Hands-on Review

Unless you’re feeling nostalgic about the printing press, going digital is definitely the more convenient and cost-efficient way to share data in your small or mid-sized business. Having a network storage array with an Internet connection will allow everyone in your business to quickly access the data stored.

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1 year ago
Hands-on Review

Have you ever tried moving a large 20GB file from one computer to another without a network-attached storage drive? It’s a painful, slow process with a substantial chance of failure. Also, seeing a Windows or Mac computer progress bar estimate that it’s going to take a little over a year to finish the data transfer doesn’t exactly help.

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1 year ago
Hands-on Review

Data storage is big business these days. Everyone, from the hometown librarian to massive corporate entities, is always looking for a way to store, secure and aggregate their many data currents. One company, Overland Storage, offers a wide range of data management solutions.

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1 year ago
Features

There was a time when only very large corporations needed RAID storage. RAID storage is still used by large corporations, but today you’ll also find small businesses and individual users taking advantage of its features. Data Robotics’ Drobo storage arrays make affordable entry points to failsafe storage, and they’re made all the more affordable with the instant savings you can get from B&H until the end of June.

 

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1 year ago
Hands-on Review

If there’s one thing you should know about Thunderbolt connectivity, it’s this: Thunderbolt transfers data fast. Very fast. 10Gbps fast. Twice that of USB 3.0’s 5Gbps speed. If you’re looking for an external hard drive that can transfer data at those speeds via dual Thunderbolt ports, includes RAID support and provides up to 2TB of storage space, the Western Digital 2TB My Book VelociRaptor Duo Thunderbolt Desktop Hard Drive delivers.

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2 years ago
Hands-on Review

Time is money, as the saying goes. Any technique or tool that can help you work faster can also help you get more work done in a given space of time, thus leading to greater profits. At the very least you’ll be able to carve out more time to spend with your family, friends, hobbies or just a nice comfy chair.

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2 years ago
Hands-on Review

The Western Digital Sentinel DX4000 is a small office storage server designed for file sharing and backing up data on as many as 25 computers. While the thought of working with a server may be daunting for novice and immediate users, setting up the Western Digital Sentinel DX4000 is simple and easy.

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2 years ago
Hands-on Review

There was a time when only large corporations used RAID storage. It was partly because only large corporations had enough data to warrant the use of RAID storage and partly because only large corporations could afford to purchase and maintain such high-end storage. RAID storage is still used by large corporations, but today you’ll find that RAID storage is also used by small businesses and individuals.

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2 years ago
News

Extremely fast, large capacity hard drives aren’t luxury items for high definition video editors, music producers, 3D animators, graphic designers and the like—they’re a necessity. 

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2 years ago
News

External hard drives continue to offer more and more capacity. That’s nothing new. But Western Digital’s My Book Live Duo drives are new, and so are many of the neat features they offer. Part external hard drive, part NAS device and part cloud storage, the My Book Live Duo drives are as versatile as external hard drives can get.

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2 years ago
Hands-on Review

I have a backup methodology in which I maintain two external hard drives. I back up all of my files—documents, pictures, music, movies, etc.—on each drive so that if one of the drives goes belly up, I still have all of my files intact on the other drive. This is almost like maintaining a RAID 1 array, except with a lot more hassle.

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3 years ago