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Rode VideoMic Pro

The Rode VideoMic Pro Shotgun microphone delivers quality sound in a compact size that's a great fit for HDSLR users. In addition, the mic's +20dB option can render less noise in HDSLR shooters' audio recordings, if their camera has manual audio control.

Get a Sweet Vicoustic Screen for $1 When You Buy a R0DE Mic in August 2010!

When you're recording music or voice-overs for video production, you want to capture as neutral a signal as possible. It's distracting to hear the echo of a room in a recording. An effective way to neutralize the sound is with a reflection filter, and for the month of August you can get a really useful Vicoustic Flexi Screen for $1 when you buy a select R0DE condenser microphone!

My Favorite Inexpensive Shotgun Mic

This week one of my co-workers asked me which inexpensive shotgun microphone I recommended for use with a Zoom H4n portable recorder. His one requirement was that the mic could not cost more than $150. I looked at the available options in this price range for a few minutes and eventually came back with nothing. The simple answer was that the best shotgun microphone in the $150 price range costs around $250.

Why and When to Use a Stereo Mic on a Camera

A typical human being sees the world through two eyes, smells the world through two nostrils, and hears the world through two ears. Why we only have one mouth is a mystery, but it likely has something to do with noise pollution. Since we hear the world through two separate ears, recording audio in stereo for video work seems like a natural choice, but it isn’t always the best choice. Even so, there are many situations where using a stereo mic on a camera yields really nice results. In this article I’ll tell you about the times when you should use a stereo mic on a video camera, and make it clear when you should use a different kind of microphone. Plus I’ll share some mission critical tips for getting good sound when shooting outdoors.

An Important Notice for R0DE Mic Owners

This curious looking wavy blue ring is causing a lot of confusion for customers who buy new R0DE microphones. The ring is a small spacer that comes installed inside of the mic. The ring can be easily removed, and it's a good idea to remove it immediately after you buy a new R0DE. The ring prohibits many XLR cables from connecting, and you may think your new mic is defective if you're unaware of this issue.

On the Air: An Introduction to Broadcast/Voice-Over Microphones

With tons of microphones available, how do you choose the right one? Some are all-purpose; others are meant for vocals and musical instruments; still others are designed for specific applications such as picking up the tones of a harmonica. We'll be focusing here on broadcasting microphones and what makes them ideal for capturing speech. Broadcast mics are widely used in radio studios. They're ideal for voiceovers and announcing.

The Sweet Sounds of HD - Recording Great Sounding Audio with the Canon EOS 5D MkII

The EOS 5D Mark II, one of the latest offerings from Canon, is the world's first dSLR camera to offer Full HD video recording capability. But what if you want to capture great sounding audio to accompany your great looking video? The 5D MkII records stunning video clips at a 1080p resolution with a frame rate of 30fps, but the audio is recorded with a tiny built-in mono microphone. Thankfully the camera also includes a stereo 3.5mm microphone input that will enable you to capture much better audio than that offered by the built-in mic. Shooting video on the MkII is very easy.

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