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If you don’t have the budget to buy or rent studio lighting gear, or you just prefer to travel light, can you still get studio-style results?

The good news is that you can. The equipment will not be as functionally convenient as gear designed specifically for the job. You’ll have to get a bit creative in terms of how you piece together and use parts that weren’t conceived for this purpose. In the end, light is light—it’s how you use it and how you modify the sources that really give lighting its “look.”

Editor's Note: This is a guest blogpost by Brian Dilg, Chair, New York Film Academy Photography School

Opening photo is Day Two Hundred Ninety-nine: Ninja Time [Explored] by Stormline via the B&H Photo Flickr Group

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1 year ago
News

A light-modification tool works in conjunction with different types of AC flashes. Many professional photographers put the bare tube flash head, or monolight without the reflector, in a lightbank. The quality of light is unparalleled. It mimics window light, so the appearance is extremely natural. Your goal as a still-life photographer is the creation of lighting which never crosses the viewer’s mind as being from an artificial source.

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2 years ago
Features

Someone recently asked for a “super basic lesson on flash” in, as they said, “one or two steps.”  When I say flash, I mean supplementary light that is being used when documenting people, places or things as they are presented to you. I am NOT talking about studio work, where you can control the light and the subject. I am talking about when the photographer has to react to the subject and the light as they are given.

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2 years ago
Features

Before you know it, vacation time will be here. You'll want to capture lots of photos to document your experiences. It’s usually a good idea to have a bag in which to carry your camera and associated gear. But you won't want to pack too much, lest your shoulders and back start to hurt from carrying around lots of gear for long periods.

If you're planning on traveling soon, here are a few tips on how to keep your bag light.

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2 years ago
News

This week in the news: Adobe released Photoshop and Premiere Elements 11; Black Magic told us why there is such a delay on their cameras; Apple's iOS 6 made a lot of headlines, and more.

This is your B&H Photo Pulse News Roundup for September 28th, 2012. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for the latest news as it breaks.

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2 years ago
News

Rudy Winston recently gave a presentation at the B&H Event Space on the popular Canon Speedlite Flash system. BHInsights tracked him down and was able to pick his brain a bit more about using the Canon Speedlite system for consumers. 

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

A few thoughts on shooting in low light situations: To begin with you will need to use a high ISO. Most cameras' lowest ISO is the native (default). This is 100 ISO on Canon and usually 200 on Nikon. You may need to set yours as high as 1600 or 3200 ISO to capture the shot. Do some test shooting before your important shoot.  

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3 years ago
Tips and Solutions

“What’s the best f-stop?” This is the second most commonly asked question that arrives in my inbox. It’s no surprise—depth of field (DOF) is a mystery, since you really can’t see it in the viewfinder of your DSLR. No matter if you’re just beginning or a seasoned pro, this is a question you should always ask yourself when you put that camera to your eye. (In fact, you should be asking that before then.) It’s not a question you should be asking Moose. Not that I don’t know the answer, but I only know the answer for my own photography. Since it’s your storytelling, you need be the judge of what the best f-stop is.

But how do you get to that point, come to learn, and to own the right lens with the best f-stop for your photography?

Editor's Note: This is a guest blog post by Moose Peterson.

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3 years ago
News

Studio lights are essential for many types of product and fashion shots, and I’ve used them for decades. Sometimes I like to keep things simple, though, and it’s fun to challenge myself to create lighting that evokes a mood and an emotion with just a single portable flash. I recently photographed a beautiful young model, Ellecie White of Hillsboro, Tennessee, and I thought this would be the perfect time to minimize my equipment. I felt it would be less intimidating to a five-year-old, and I was sure I could create the type of lighting I wanted.



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3 years ago
News

Have you ever looked at photographs and wondered how they were lit? Strobist diagrams can help after the fact, but what about before: how do you know how to get the look you want? Consider a cinematography technique: lighting your scene one light at a time.







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3 years ago
News

With FlashThe off camera flash is one of the most versatile pieces of equipment in our camera bags. It can serve as our main light source, an accent light, or be used to simply fill in shadow areas of a high contrast scene. Recently I have been experimenting using the flash to illuminate foreground subjects in the landscape. I first came up with the idea when photographing a lava beach in Hawaii.


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4 years ago
Tips and Solutions

 Thank you for all the reads on our “Bare Tube Flash Head 101” article. This one is the obvious follow-up story. Without the power pack component, the flash head has no fuel. The pack’s the control panel for the system.

    



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4 years ago
Features


There is no doubt about it; India is a photographer’s carnival. The colors are kaleidoscopic; the scenes are cinematic; and the light is luminous. I’ve been traveling to Rajasthan for the past few years to lead the National Geographic Expeditions India Photo Tour—a tour that has focused on light and lighting.

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4 years ago
Features

Many photographers try to break down the concept of flash photography into what they think are the understandable elements: the numerical values of the settings used. They want numbers, they want the f-stop. However, the scenarios we encounter as photographers vary so much that it becomes meaningless for anyone to “give you the f-stop.”

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4 years ago
Tips and Solutions

LED lights produce very little heat and they’re powerful, lightweight and thrifty when it comes to power consumption. While a continuous light source and a flash unit are typically two separate devices, the Litepanels MicroPro Hybrid, specifically designed for DV and HDSLR cameras, is a portable LED light panel with built-in flash capability.

 


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5 years ago
Features