Mid-Level DSLR

When categorizing the many DSLRs we carry at B&H into three groups—entry level, midrange and professional— there are some models that, depending on their attributes, price points or your point of view, fall into more than one camp. Our selection of mid-range DSLRs is no exception. You can call them "Mid-Range" cameras, but a few of them are well up to the challenge of full-time pro shooting.

Professional's Choice

Professionals tend to expect more from the tools they use. They expect them to perform reliably, accurately and smoothly on good days and bad. On top of all that, they expect their tools to feel proper, secure and "right" in the hand. And these very same folk often have the same expectations when it comes to pedestrian items. We'd like to talk about a half-dozen point-and-shoot digital cameras that should appeal to serious-minded shooters seeking a pocket-sized camera that feels and performs like a "real" camera.


While there may not ever be a "perfect" lens, there has long been a need for a one-lens solution for shooters who want to head out the door with one camera and one lens over their shoulder. The reasons vary. For some it's a matter of convenience. For some, it's a matter of pure laziness and for others it's the fear of getting dust on the sensor. For frequent flyers it's a matter of logistics, i.e., there's a limit to how much airlines allow you  to carry aboard the plane (almost all of these lenses are surprisingly compact).

Entry-Level Cameras

The interesting thing about entry level point-and-shoot digicams is that the simplest, least expensive of the lot is capable of taking wonderfully sharp, angst-free photographs. The costlier, more "'complicated" digicams can perform more "tricks" or have wider or longer lenses  than entry-level digicams, but at the end of the day, each of these econo-cams capture surprisingly fine stills and video.

Panasonic Lumix ZR3

The Panasonic Lumix ZR3 has a true 25mm f/3.3 Leica Vario Elmar 8x wide-angle zoom lens and a 14MP CCD sensor. This camera shoots video in 720p HD and offers optical image stabilization.

Panasonic Lumix LX5

This is the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX5. With an f/2.0 Leica DC Vario Summicron lens and a 3.8x zoom from 24 to 90mm, this Panasonic camera will enable you to capture outstanding images in almost every lighting situation you can imagine.

Panasonic G-Series Optics (Wide Angle, 3D-Capable and Super Zoom)

Panasonic has added a trio of new guns: a Lumix G 14mm/2.5 ASPH wide-angle, a Lumix G Vario 100-300mm/f4-5.6 OIS super zoom and most intriguing of the three, a "two-eyed" Lumix G 12.5mm/f12.5 3D lens designed to capture 3D imagery when used with Panasonic Lumix G-series cameras.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FH20

This camera is perfect for fast-moving subjects and in low light with features that include High Speed Autofocus, Optical Image Stabilization and High Sensitivity ISO 6400. You can even capture HD-quality video. Taking both stills and video is easy, framing and playing back your images on the 2.7" 230,000-dot high-resolution LCD screen.

Which One: Nikon P7000 vs Panasonic LX-5 vs Canon S95

With today's announcement of the Nikon P7000, amateurs and enthusiasts have a wide range of premium point and shoots potentially to choose from. The P7000 has its own strengths while the Panasonic LX-5 and the Canon S95 cater to a similar but different audience. So which one is for you?

Equinox HD6 Protects Panasonic Camcorders Under the Sea

If you’ve got a Panasonic HDC-TM700 camcorder, Equinox has an underwater housing for you. The Equinox HD6 underwater housing will protect your camcorder down to 250 feet beneath the waves.



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