Eizo Monitors for Creative Professionals

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There are monitors, and then there are Monitors. When shopping for a monitor, most casual PC users look for the two P’s—price and pretty. People who use monitors on a more professional level look much farther—color calibration, Adobe RGB color space matching, flexible input options—and they’re willing to pay for the premium. Eizo makes a series of monitors aimed at the high-end world of video and photo post production, and they come up with two clear display workhorses.

The Eizo ColorEdge CG247

The first of these two monitors is the Eizo ColorEdge CG247. As a monitor, it has what every user needs, including amazing resolution, color-correlation options, and factory-adjusted gamma setting. It has a 24" IPS panel for extensive 178° viewing angle, and 1920 x 1200 native resolution with a 16:10 aspect ratio and a 518.4 x 324mm viewable image size. The pixel pitch is a compact .27 x 0.27 mm, with a typical brightness of 350 cd/m². It also sports a 7.7 ms GTG response time (gray-to-gray response time refers to the amount of time a pixel goes from gray to another color and back to gray again).

Specs like that would make any gamer drool, and certainly will fill the needs of casual users, but for the creative professionals, these monitors really begin to shine with the addition of robust features like a built in self-calibration sensor. This sensor pops up from the bottom bezel of the monitor and calibrates your monitor, eliminating the need for third-party calibration devices. What’s great about this feature is that it also calibrates whether the monitor is switched off or not connected to a computer, guaranteeing that the monitor will self-calibrate at scheduled specific times. It removes the deductive process of calibrating manually, and is a time-saver in the long run—you can spend less time worrying about color-matching and more time focusing on your productivity. The monitor can also be correlated with external calibration devices as well, so that after taking a reading from your third-party device, the sensor on the Eizo CG247 will automatically recalibrate according to the readings. If you work in an office with multiple Eizo monitors and you want consistent and precise color output, you can calibrate one, and use the calibration settings on all via the sensor and a third-party device.

A lot of the calibration is made possible through the bundled ColorNavigator 6 software. It allows you to retouch and print color-matched digital photos with ease. Also included with your monitor is access to Eizo’s ColorNavigator NX network, which allows you to control multiple monitors in a studio or agency setting. With ColorNavigator installed on the monitors, an administrator can calibrate all monitors individually or in a group. You can also set the calibration schedules for the group, set color modes, and actively lock monitors against unintended color changes.

New to the CG247 are features that most professionals will recognize and appreciate. The monitors are capable of reproducing 99% of the Adobe RGB color space. This expansive range also reproduces most of the ISO-coated and US web-coated CMYK color spaces used in printing, as well as 93% of the DCI used in post production. Why does this matter? For the most accurate color reproduction of your work across different media (like plastic-coated paper, glossy film, or any other coated media), you need to have the monitor match your colors as closely as possible, or you’ll end up, for example, with a cerulean sky in a photo that was originally Mediterranean blue.

If you’re using the DisplayPort input, the monitor delivers more than one billion colors, with 10-bit simultaneous display from a 16-bit LUT (look up table)—as long as you have the graphics card and software to support it. Typical monitors can input an 8-bit image display and process an 8-bit output. But with the ColorEdge CG247, you get 64 times that amount. Color gradations, sharpness, and the Delta-E difference between simultaneous colors has never been clearer or more defined.

To make sure things stay as true to the original as possible, it’s also important to have the chromaticity on the screen as stable as possible (chromaticity refers to the luminance of color around different parts of the screen; red in the middle of your screen may not pop as much as red at the corners of your screen). Eizo uses DUE (digital uniformity equalizer) technology on its monitors before they leave the factory, ensuring that there is a Delta-E difference of 3 or less across the screen before it ships (a Delta-E rating of 1.0 is the smallest color difference the human eye can see).

On some low-end monitors, you can see the gradation between colors (they almost look faintly like the old color bars that were broadcast by a television station signing off), although it may not be readily apparent. On Eizo Color Edge monitors, the gradation is smoother and more even.

For creative professionals who use and depend on monitors regularly, you know that sometimes it can take a monitor as long as 30 minutes to go from on to a stable “on,” where the chromaticity and tone characteristics are at a usable and true level. The Eizo monitors claim a startup-to-working-time of only seven minutes, cutting your wait time by almost 75% and increasing your productivity even more.

As for the flexibility in connectivity, the monitor has DisplayPort, HDMI and DVI-D inputs that support up to 2560 x 1440 resolutions. It also contains two USB upstream ports so that two devices (like computers) can be connected at once, eliminating the frustrating prospect of recalibrating the monitor when switching between them. Other amenities include 128mm height adjustment, 30° tilt and 344° swivel adjustment, and the ability to swing the monitor from portrait to landscape. Also cool: the monitor hood that’s included with this purchase can be used in portrait or landscape mode.

You can’t really pigeonhole the audience for a monitor like this, but you can say that it is definitely geared more toward high-end professional video post-production work and dedicated, color-sensitive print and photo work. As a matter of fact, this monitor even maintains high-contrast ratios when working in limited light situations, so that unlike LCD backlit monitors, you can still see deep rich blacks, even at an angle. The monitor even contains several broadcast-standard color modes (including Rec. 709, EBU, SMPTE-C, and DCI), and includes a 3D LUT that applies a film look to images so video ediors can see what the audience will see. The 3D LUT also helps in the RGB combination, which is of paramount importance when trying to display gray tones.

Eizo is so confident of the engineering behind the CG247 that the company offers a pixel-defect warranty of up to 12 months, which guarantees that pixel failure will be held to zero for 12 months after date of purchase, based on ISO 9241-307 (pixel failure class I).

Hands-On Testing

Unboxing these beauties was a real joy, and setup was simple. The CG247 came with a single link DVI cable, mini-DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable, and USB cable (used for calibration; this is not used to connect anything else to the monitor). An included power cable is the only other thing you need to get started (although it was a nice touch to see Eizo throw in a screen cleaner and shade hood), and there's also an included lab-test report and software for calibration. Alas, home-entertainment enthusiasts—no HDMI cable was included, although I had plenty of my own laying around, for testing.

"What really got my attention was the way the color was spread uniformly around the screen."

When setting up, I chose a well-lit workspace where I knew I would put the monitor to good use. The room the monitor sat in was controlled by dimmable lights so that I could adjust the screen brightness as needed.

I connected my base PC (Intel® Core™ i7 running Windows 7 Professional 64-bit) via the DVI cable first and used the monitor in dual screen mode. Big mistake! It made my regular monitor look like complete garbage once the sensor calibrated the color space and made me immediately aware of the difference between a monitor and a professional, color-calibrated, high-end monitor. What really got my attention was the way the color was spread uniformly around the screen. Even in the corners, the brightness and gamma levels were as clear and as sharp as they were in the middle of the screen. Eizo wasn’t kidding about the stable start-up time either—I clocked it at less than seven minutes for stable chromaticity levels.

My first test was editing high-res photos of my kids using Photoshop Elements. The 20MP photos were taken in close-up, and every single pore of my children’s faces looked like a crater on the moon (and they’re toddlers, thank goodness, so I don’t have to Photoshop any acne scars away). Using every filter in Elements was an experience when seeing the photos through a high-end monitor like this. Post-production work aside, a prosumer with this monitor will never complain about the color accuracy or visuals that this monitor presents. You will see colors and gradations and blends that you did not think were possible on your monitor (and probably aren’t).

Another cool aspect of this monitor is its ability to use an external sensor to match the paper you will print on and set the target values for uniform brightness. It can also calibrate with your lightbox for value accuracy when color matching.

The ability to emulate the color characteristics of other devices such as tablets, notebooks, and PCs is also a cool feature. Why? Because you can show a client how their website will look in the exact setting that the rest of the world will see. It’s another useful tool that I would use (although it requires a spectrophotometer, which is sold separately; I don’t happen to have any extras lying around the house).

The built-in calibration sensor is a wonderful addition, but I found myself changing and customizing the monitor calibration myself after setup. I don’t know if I did it correctly, though, since I don’t do a lot of post-production video editing, so you will want to look into the many, many options you have with calibration. I did get my photos to a nice, clear, and eyeball-popping clarity and color depth that I have never seen before on a monitor. Ever.

The Eizo ColorEdge CX241

Eizo’s other featured monitor is the Eizo ColorEdge CX241, which mirrors many of the same features of the CG247. It also has a 24" IPS panel screen with a 178° viewing angle, 1920 x 1200 native resolution with a 16:10 aspect ratio, and a 518.4 x 324mm viewable image size. The pixel pitch is still a compact .27 x 0.27 mm, with a typical brightness of 350 cd/m². This monitor also offers 7.7 ms GTG response time.

So what differentiates the two? There are minor amenities left out—this version has a built-in sensor to maintain white point and brightness values, but it does not have a built-in calibration tool. The built-in sensor does allow you to maintain the color settings without software, which is a big plus. The LCD panel’s white point is measured at the factory and any readjustment is compared against that value.

Also added is the support via HDMI input for I/P conversion (interlace and progressive) to convert the interlace signals from TV and video into progressive signals, which reduces flickering.

The CX241 keeps everything else status quo: ColorNavigator 6 software—check. ColorNavigator NX Network connectivity and the ability to color-match workstation monitors from a single administrator— check. 10-bit simultaneous display for more than a billion colors? Double-check. 99% Adobe RGB color space matching, DUE chromaticity for even gradations across the screen, and even the portrait/landscape hood feature are all here, although the hood is an option on the CX241 instead of boxed in with the display.

Hands-On Testing

The CX241 doesn’t have the wealth of options for high-end professional post-production work that the CG series does, so I used it slightly differently. Unboxed, I found the factory test report, a dual-link DVI cable, a mini-DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable, and the USB and power cables. This monitor does not include a shade hood, nor does it come with a screen-cleaning kit.

I wanted to see how this monitor would run in a more basic consumer mode, so I ran two scenarios. I first used an HDMI cable to hook the monitor to my high-definition cable box to see how it would perform as a television. Now, normally, I’d say you’re wasting the monitor’s potential by using a high-end color-corrected monitor as a TV, but I was curious. Guess what. Not a TV. Don’t use as a TV. Looks great, but the color accuracy does nothing to enhance your cable signal. It did erase any artifacts that I normally get when watching TV, and its 1920 x 1080 resolution does shine, but really, using a $1,200 monitor as a TV is silly. Even when tweaking the color settings to match an unnaturally green football field, an unnaturally blue ocean (it was Shark Week when I started this article) or an unnaturally red sunset, it was interesting, but not feasible to imagine buying this as a TV monitor. Also, without built in speakers, you’ll end up paying a lot more for your home entertainment when you could be using this to do some real work.

The second use was for gaming. I hooked the monitor up to two systems. Using a mini-HDMI to HDMI cable, I tested the extreme color on a Dell Venue 11 Pro hybrid and once again hooked it up to my regular desktop. In both cases, the graphics card installed in your computer will make a much bigger difference than an outstanding monitor. However, the game graphics with this monitor had the sharpest and clearest color effects you’ll ever see. There was no problem differentiating the color gradations, even when all graphic properties were cranked up to their max. Just to see what the monitor could do for gaming, I set my Guild Wars 2 account to the maximum resolution on my desktop (using an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760 graphics card with 2GB of dedicated RAM), made adjustments on every point, and calibrated the monitor slightly. Although I saw my overall frames-per-second run time drop slightly, the colors onscreen were amazing. And again, I mean eye-popping, jaw-dropping amazing.

But that’s not what this monitor is made for, so I went back to editing photos using Adobe Photoshop Elements. Again, you won’t miss the built-in calibration sensor, or even the shade hood (okay, maybe the shade hood), but a lot of other color-calibrating options are still included in this monitor, and with some tweaking you will experience the most accurate color representation possible in a monitor, and you will understand why a monitor demands a price this high.

Video professionals, photo editors, and print specialists who are looking for the truest color reproduction don’t have to look much farther than EIZO’s ColorEdge CG247 and CX241. With an accurate color-matching monitor at your workstation, everything around you will seem much brighter—including your production schedules.

  Eizo ColorEdge CG247 Monitor Eizo ColorEdge CX241 Monitor
Cabinet Color Black Black
Panel
Type IPS IPS
Size 24.1" / 61 cm (611mm diagonal) 24.1" / 61 cm (611mm diagonal)
Native Resolution 1920 x 1200 (16:10 aspect ratio) 1920 x 1200 (16:10 aspect ratio)
Viewable Image Size (H x V) 518.4 x 324mm 518.4 x 324mm
Pixel Pitch 0.270 x 0.270mm 0.270 x 0.270mm
Grayscale Tones DisplayPort, HDMI: 1024 tones (a palette of 65281 tones)
DVI: 256 tones (a palette of 65281 tones)
DisplayPort, HDMI: 1024 tones (a palette of 65281 tones)
DVI: 256 tones (a palette of 65281 tones)
Display Colors DisplayPort, HDMI: 1.07 billion from a palette of 278 trillion
DVI: 16.77 million from a palette of 278 trillion
DisplayPort, HDMI: 1.07 billion from a palette of 278 trillion
DVI: 16.77 million from a palette of 278 trillion
Viewing Angles (H / V, typical) 178°, 178° 178°, 178°
Brightness (typical) 350 cd/m2 350 cd/m2
Recommended Brightness for Calibration 120 cd/m2 or less 120 cd/m2 or less
Contrast Ratio (typical) 1000:01:00 1000:01:00
Response Time (typical) 7.7 ms (Gray-to-gray) 7.7 ms (Gray-to-gray)
Wide Gamut Coverage (typical) Adobe RGB: 99% Adobe RGB: 99%
Video Signals
Input Terminals DVI-D 24 pin (with HDCP), DisplayPort (with HDCP), HDMI (with HDCP, Deep Color) DVI-I 29 pin (with HDCP), DisplayPort (with HDCP), HDMI (with HDCP, Deep Color)
Digital Scanning Frequency (H / V) DisplayPort, DVI: 26 - 78 kHz, 23.75 - 63 Hz (VGA Text: 69 - 71 Hz)
HDMI: 15 - 78 kHz, 23.75 - 61 Hz (VGA Text: 69 - 71 Hz)
DisplayPort, DVI: 26 - 78 kHz, 23.75 - 63 Hz (VGA Text: 69 - 71 Hz)
HDMI: 15 - 78 kHz, 23.75 - 61 Hz (VGA Text: 69 - 71 Hz)
USB   26 - 78 kHz, 47.5 - 61 Hz
Function 2 ports for monitor control
2-port USB hub
2 ports for monitor control
2-port USB hub
Standard USB 2.0 USB 2.0
Power
Power Requirements AC 100 - 120 V / 200 - 240 V, 50 / 60 Hz AC 100 - 120 V / 200 - 240 V, 50 / 60 Hz
Maximum Power Consumption 83 W 81 W
Typical Power Consumption 33 W 32 W
Power Save Mode Less than 0.7 W Less than 0.5 W
Standby Mode Less than 0.5 W Less than 0.5 W
Power Management Power Save (DisplayPort Version 1.1a, and DVI DMPM) Power Save (VESA DPM, DisplayPort Version 1.1a, and DVI DMPM)
Self-Calibration Yes Yes
Features & Functions
Brightness Stabilization Yes Yes
Digital Uniformity Equalizer Yes Yes
Preset Modes Color Mode (Custom, Adobe RGB, sRGB, REC709, EBU, SMPTE-C, DCI, Calibration) Color Mode (Custom, Paper, Adobe RGB, sRGB, Calibration)
OSD Languages English, German, French, Italian, Japanese, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Swedish, Traditional Chinese English, German, French, Italian, Japanese, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Swedish, Traditional Chinese
Others Screen Size (full screen, enlarge, normal)
Color Adjustment (Brightness, Contrast, Black Level, Independent 6-Color Control, Gamma, Temperature, Saturation, Hue, Gain, Reset)
HDMI Settings (Noise Reduction, Film Detection, Safe Area Marker, Safe Area Size, Border Color)
Range Extension
Signal Switching
OSD Menu Settings
Overdrive
Input Skip
Mode Skip
USB Selection
Signal Info
Monitor Info
DUE Priority
Key Lock
Signal Bandwidth
Power Indicator
All Reset
Screen Adjustment (Clock, Phase, Position, Resolution, Range (Auto))
Screen Size (full screen, enlarge, normal)
Color Adjustment (Brightness, Contrast, Black Level, Independent 6-Color Control, Gamma, Temperature, Saturation, Hue, Gain, Reset)
HDMI Settings (Noise Reduction)
Range Extension
Signal Switching
OSD Menu Settings
Overdrive
Input Skip
Mode Skip
USB Selection
Signal Info
Monitor Info
DUE Priority
Key Lock
Signal Bandwidth
Power Indicator
All Reset
Physical Specifications
Dimensions (Landscape, W x H x D) 575 x 417 - 545 x 245.5mm 575 x 417 - 545 x 245.5mm
Dimensions (Portrait, W x H x D) 398 x 594.5 - 642.5 x 245.5mm 398 x 594.5 - 642.5 x 245.5mm
Dimensions (Without Stand, W x H x D) 575 x 398 x 75mm 575 x 398 x 75mm
Net Weight 9.1 kg / 20.1 lb 9.0 kg / 19.8 lb
Dimensions (Landscape with Hood, W x H x D) 582.5 x 425 - 553 x 369mm  
Dimensions (Portrait with Hood, W x H x D) 406 x 602.5 - 650.5 x 369mm  
Net Weight (Without Stand) 6.5 kg / 14.3 lb 6.4 kg / 14.1 lb
Net Weight (With Hood) 9.9 kg / 21.8 lb Not specified by manufacturer
Height Adjustment Range 128mm 128mm
Tilt 30° Up, 0° Down 30° Up, 0° Down
Swivel 344° 344°
Pivot 90° 90°
Hole Spacing (VESA Standard) 100 x 100mm 100 x 100mm
Environmental Requirements
Operating Temperature 0 - 35 °C 0 - 35 °C
Operating Humidity (R.H., non condensing) 20 - 80 % 20 - 80 %
Certifications & Standards (Please contact the EIZO group company or distributor in your country for the latest information.) CE
TUV/GS
cTUVus
FCC-B
Canadian ICES-003-B
VCCI-B
TUV/Ergonomics (including ISO 9241-307 [Pixel fault class I])
c-Tick
RoHS
WEEE
GOST-R
CE
TUV/GS
cTUVus
FCC-B
Canadian ICES-003-B
VCCI-B
TUV/Ergonomics (including ISO 9241-307 [Pixel fault class I])
c-Tick
RoHS
WEEE
GOST-R
Supplied Accessories AC Power Cord
Signal Cables (DVI-D - DVI-D, Mini DisplayPort - DisplayPort)
USB Cable
Setup Guide
EIZO LCD Utility Disk (ColorNavigator software, PDF user's manual)
Adjustment Certificate
ScreenCleaner
Monitor Hood
Quick Reference
Warranty Card
AC power cord,
signal cables (DVI-D - DVI-D, Mini DisplayPort - DisplayPort)
USB cable
setup guide
EIZO LCD Utility Disk (ColorNavigator software, PDF user's manual)
Adjustment Certificate
Monitor Hood
Quick Reference
Warranty Card
Warranty
  Five Years  Five Years 
  The RGB full pixel failure is zero for up to 12 months after date of purchase based on ISO 9241-307 (pixel failure class I). The RGB full pixel failure is zero for up to 12 months after date of purchase based on ISO 9241-307 (pixel failure class I).

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Yes I want to buy the eizo 247
I am from India what would be the final cost
Thanks

You can find the price for the Eizo CG247 on the monitor’s page on our site. Click Here

Shipping costs would depend on the shipping method that you chose.  If you add the item to your cart, on the right hand side of the page there is a shipping calculator.  Once you choose the country of destination from the drop down menu, the various shipping options, along with their respective costs and shipping times, will be revealed.

B&H does not apply any tax on orders shipped outside NY State.  In the USA we do not have any VAT type taxes to add to your order either.  International orders are generally subject to local import duties and taxes.  Unfortunately, we cannot offer any specific advice regarding any customs related fees that you may incur. For specific information, your best bet will be to consult with your local government import office.

Don’t hesitate to send us an email with further questions: askbh@bandh.com