Windows Server 2003 is About to Die: Seagate Rises from the Ashes

Share

On July 15, the world will come crashing to an end. Or so says Microsoft. That’s the date when Microsoft will officially stop support for Windows Server 2003. And how does that affect you? It will, in several different ways, but there is a solution available now that will help ease the pain.

"Like Windows XP recently, Microsoft will stop issuing security updates for Windows Server 2003, which essentially means that anyone using this operating system for their servers will be left to their own devices, come July."

Microsoft announced this end-of-life transition almost two years ago, but many will still be caught unaware. Like Windows XP recently, Microsoft will stop issuing security updates for Windows Server 2003, which essentially means that anyone using this operating system for their servers will be left to their own devices, come July. And like Windows XP, Microsoft wants you to upgrade to Windows Server 2012 R2, Microsoft Azure, or Office 365.

Windows Server 2003 is basically an operating system in servers that allows you to run, manage, and scale your networks, from small home offices to enterprise scenarios. It incorporated the .NET software framework, which in itself was a combination of two core applications—FCL (framework class library) and CLR (common language runtime). Together, these two parts constitute the .NET framework and provide user interface data access, security, memory management, exception handling, and network communications, among other things.

Mind blown yet? Let’s put it in simpler terms: if you wanted to set up a server, and you wanted to manage that server efficiently, you needed Windows Server 2003.

But it goes buh-bye soon, and unless you’re prepared, you could be in for a heap of trouble in July. Not upgrading will leave you open to all kinds of security threats and problems, and that’s the last thing you want to worry about when you have a server with essential and critical data stored on it.

You either need to upgrade your old NAS server with Windows Server 2012, or you need to buy new servers with Windows Server 2012 pre-installed. If you go the migration route, Seagate has new servers with Windows Server 2012 already installed on it.



 


 


 

Seagate Business Storage 4-Bay NAS Windows Servers come in 4, 8, 12, and 16TB configurations, and all include a 2.13GHz dual core 64-bit Intel® Atom™ processor, 4GB of RAM and a 200 MB/s file transfer rate. They can back up from PC to NAS using client software, such as Windows Backup, or using the new Windows Server 2012, they can back up NAS to DAS (direct attached storage, like external hard drives) and even NAS to NAS. All network via dual Gigabit Ethernet connections, and include two USB 3.0 and one USB 2.0 ports. They come with Seagate hard drives, which are hot swappable for added storage flexibility.

Sounds like a new server might be in your future, especially since that future will be compromised by the soon-to-be-missing support for Windows Server 2003. Instead of revamping your old server structure, look into these pre-configured models installed with the updated Windows Server 2012. Let Seagate do the work for you. Your data will thank you.

Discussion 0

Add new comment

Add commentCancel