Fast (f/2.8) Tokina 11-16mm Ultra-Wide Zoom

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If you shoot with a compact DSLR from Nikon, Canon or Sony and you're looking for an ultra-wide zoom that's both fast and affordable compared to comparable OEM focal-length zooms, you might want to take a look at Tokina's 11–16mm f2.8 AT-X 116 Pro DX ultra-wide zoom


Equivalent to a 16.5–24mm lens on a full-frame 35mm (D)SLR (17.6–35.2mm on a Canon compact DSLR), the Tokina 11–16mm/f/2.8 AT-X 116 Pro DX stands out from similar optics in its class by its fast f/2.8 maximum aperture, which remains constant throughout its entire focal range.

Tokina 11–16mm f/2.8 AT-X 116 PRO DX Ultra-Wide Zoom

The Tokina 11–16mm f/2.8 AT-X ultra-wide features 13 elements in 11 groups, stops down to f/22, weighs 19.75 oz (560 g), and has a minimum focus of 11.8" (0.3 m). To enable quick shifting from autofocus (AF) to manual focus (MF), the new Tokina 11–16mm AT-X features a "One-Touch Focus Clutch Mechanism," which allows you to switch back and forth between AF and MF by simply snapping the focus ring a smidgeon forward or backward without the need to fumble for AF/MF switches on the camera body, which can easily break your concentration while shooting or cause you to miss the shot altogether.

Though the lens itself is not waterproof, the Tokina 11–16mm/f/2.8 AT-X 116 Pro DX features special water-repellant optical coatings that protect the front lens element from the ravages of water spray.

In addition to the obligatory front and rear lens caps, the Tokina 11–16mm/f/2.8 AT-X also includes a tulip-style lens shade to minimize lens flare when shooting toward the sun and other bright light sources.

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I picked this lens up a couple of years ago, it's killer. I dumped my Sigma 10-20mm to get it and I haven't ever looked back.

I think the math is off a bit.  11-16 on a full frame is 17.6 - 25.6 on the Canon APS-C.

This lens is indeed very good but nowhere to be found...Sold out everywhere

Purchased this lens and then realized how HEAVY zoom wide-angles are on camera - all of them.  So I came to my senses (duh!) and sent it back (very next day) to B & H - they graciously refunded me fully for my mistake. (Of course, lense and packaging were unused/perfect). 

Now I'm sticking strictly to fast primes, even if it does mean changing lenses if/when necessary.  But really, does this actually need to be done that often for limited range wide-angle work?  I think not.  

Just a word to the wise for those with learning to do (like me).  I'll be quite happy just moving a little closer to get the shots I like, all while carrying around at least one pound less, per lens.  Anyway, B & H rocks, and provides very professional and supportive service.