How I Got the Shot: Matt Kloskowski's Fall Sunrise

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Kelby Training's Education Director Matt Kloskowski photographed the stunning sunrise in his photo above. Capturing all of the details in one image like this can be a bit tough to do, but it is totally possible through various methods. How do you think Matt shot it? After being captivated by it, we talked to Matt about how he photographed it.

Take a guess, then read on, to see if you got it right.

Gear:

I used my Nikon D3 body and Nikon 28-300mm f3.5-5.6 for this one. It was mounted on a Gitzo Traveler tripod, with a Really Right Stuff BH-40 ballhead on it (the absolutely best ballheads in the industry, in my opinion). I used a cable release and a Hoodman16 GB memory card, but no filters were used for this photo. 

Original Plan/Concept:

A friend of mine had actually scouted this place. I first envisioned shooting directly at the sun, setting my aperture to f/22 and trying to get that sunstar (the star shaped flare you get when stopped down) in it. But then I realized the image would have been much more contrasty that way, and I liked all of the subtle layers of colors, so I went with this version. 

How He Shot It:

There were so many great compositions to be had, that it was hard to pick just one. So I threw on my Nikon 28-300mm lens, which let me have a lot of flexibility. It's probably not the lens most photographers pull out for landscapes, but I find it extremely useful. You can probably look through this photo and see that there are many photos within the photo. Once I shot the wide shot you see here, I was able to zoom in and pick away at some of the details without changing lenses. I find that I use this more and more on my landscape shoots. It's not the fastest focusing lens out there, but for static scenes like this, when focus speed isn't essential, it doesn't matter. 

Editor's Update: Here are the settings Matt used to shoot the image-

Aperture: f/16

Shutter Speed: 1/60

ISO: 200

Shot in RAW format

Aperture Priority

Matrix Metering

The Post Production:

I started this one off in Lightroom 3 (Lightroom 4 wasn't out yet). I tweaked the white balance to make the photo warmer. I adjusted the Exposure and Shadows, since they were a little dark compared to the sky. Then I went into Photoshop to do some cloning and healing, to remove wires and any distractions. Finally, I finished it off with a couple of my personal recipes in Nik Color Efex 4. I have the recipes online, and you can download them here for free, if you'd like.

Mostly, though, the Nik plug-in makes the colors pop a little more, brings out some of the details, and adds a nice vignette—things that I could always do in Photoshop with a bunch of layers, filters, and blend modes, but only take me about 3 seconds to apply in Color Efex Pro. 

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this piece do not necessarily reflect the views of B&H Photo, Video, Pro Audio

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You never actually stated what settings you did use for this shot. I am also guessing that you shot this in RAW so you had the maximum amount of information. 

Beautiful shot but I don't see the details of the settings used for the shot.

Beautiful picture Matt.

I have a couple of questions, what settings did you use?

ISO, aperture, shutter speed?

Did you shoot in manual or aperture priority mode?

If you shot in manual mode was there a specfic spot in the sceene inwhich you took the meter reading?

I also found it very interesting that you used a 28-300 lens. I use my 18-200 all time and it works well but I dont have a choice, I don't have any wide angle glass.

BR,

Mark

Sorry everyone. I guess I forgot about the camera settings :-)

Aperture: f/16

Shutter Speed: 1/60

ISO: 200

Shot in raw format

Aperture Priority

Matrix Metering

Thanks,

Matt K

Great shot Matt!

Here you can see guys that you don't need that expensive gear to get awesome shots. 

Thanks for sharing. 

It would be good to get more information on it for sure. Thanks

Unless you have his original RAW file or was standing next to him in the field the exact settings he used in Lightroom doesn't matter.

Unless the tractor was moving ISO and shutter speed don't really matter since as the sun rises it will change pretty fast.  If I had to guess though I would say somewhere around f8 or so.

Reading a lot of Matt's blogs and training at NAPP, I can probably tell you that Matt shot this in RAW at either 100 or 200 iso.  Aperture priority is his standard mode. However, he could have gone Manual on this on, but I'll stick with Aperture.:-)  I'm also sure he used f16 for his f-stop.

My question to Matt is where did you take this?  I'm assuming on your NE trip? :-)

Dennis

Beautiful shot and interesting article.  Thanks.

Is the vignetting in this shot a natural effect of that lens or was it added in Photoshop?

What focal length was the lens at when the shot was taken?  Was it cropped at all?

Matt,

I downloaded your presets for this picture for NIK Color Effects Pro 4. When I go to import them into NIK Color Effects Pro 4 in Photoshop CS6 Extended, I get the following message:

! Preset cannot be imported, it includes filters not part of tis edition.

What's going on?

Thanks for any help.

Terry

Matt,

I downloaded your presets for this picture for NIK Color Effects Pro 4. When I go to import them into NIK Color Effects Pro 4 in Photoshop CS6 Extended, I get the following message:

! Preset cannot be imported, it includes filters not part of tis edition.

What's going on?

Thanks for any help.

Terry