Lomography Spinner: 360° Panoramas for the Masses

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Taking 360° panoramic pictures used to be the domain of those wealthy enough to afford the exotic cameras that took these dramatic images. Not anymore. What was once the domain of the well heeled is now the domain of the high heeled and flip-flop crowd. Now anybody with $134.95 and a few rolls of film in the fridge can be counted among the hoitiest and toitiest landscape shooters.


What you get for your money is the new Lomography Spinner, a 35mm film-based "roto camera" that is based on some of the very same scientific principles applied in the development of rubber band-powered balsa wood airplanes, spinning tops and yo-yos. Starting with a fixed 25mm lens designed to  the strict optical standards Lomography enthusiasts worldwide have come to demand, the Lomo Spinner records photographs with 360-degree horizontal angles of view (66° vertically) onto 35mm film with a simple flick of a wrist... literally.

360° View of the Lomography Spinner 360° Camera
 

To take a 360-degree shot with a Lomography Spinner, you hold the camera's grip in one hand and pull the cord that protrudes from the top of the grip in a single smooth tug. The camera then spins on its axis while recording everything spinning past the lens. Shutter speeds are somewhere in the neighborhood of 1/125th ~ 1/250th-of-a-second (How's that for precision?) and there's a choice of two apertures: f/8 & f/16. The resulting pictures are about 4x wider than a standard 35mm picture, and you can expect to take about six exposures on a 36-exposure roll of 35mm film.

We expect to receive the first batch of these cameras shortly (we're taking pre-orders) and will surely post a bunch of pics the first chance we get.

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i want one of these sooooo bad...

Is there a tripod mount?

Will a regular camera store develop the film? 

too bad it is film only.  looks pretty gimmicky

Film... what is that? How about one for digital use?

Does the film move as in a Noblex or a Widelux, or is it stationary while the lens moves -- or some other system?

Would like to see if it will compair to 360 imagery on our site at http://www.360floridakeys.com

"Getting the film developed anywhere wouldn't be a problem, getting the negatives properly cut would.": If the negatives are "about 4x wider than a standard 35mm picture" then one might actually have some luck at a consumer developer, as negatives are typically cut in strips of 4 frames.

Of course, printing would still represent a problem.

OK.  I am intrigued... How much? and... do any of us know if we are going to be able to buy FILM in the future?  And... what about a digital version?

This sound' great and I'd like to add one to my photo equipment , but the phrase "strict optical standards" sound's a bit worrisome? What standards and how good are these standards???? I'll be looking forward to actual images to see if the quality is there. $134 is a great price for a pano camera, but not if the images are "Brownie" quality.

As to developing, a number of places will develop film uncut so they should be able to accommodate this imaging format.

Hey, if it's Lomographic, it isn't electronic so digital is out!!! (At least right now). 

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What a WONDERFUL development!

 

The geniuses at Lomo have made it possible to do sloppy, always under/overexposed, fuzzy, distorted, barely recognizable parodies of photography in a full 360-degree sweep. 

 

Now, stuff that the high-school photography teacher would have thrown into the trashcan can become “art.”  How long will it be before we see nine foot-wide prints from this lump of plastic on the walls of MOMA?

So what if it isn't digital. You can scan to digital. 6 - 35mm frames is big.

Manufacture site says 8 shots per 36 exposure roll. Also found YouTube vids of operation. Shots per roll / 360 overlap will vary between shots.

Spinner 360 Camera

Does the 360 take the image at when the string in pulled or when it is released?

Any online companies process/scan the film w/wo sprockets

If exposure is when the pulled string is released has anyone created a remote release yet?

Why not a lens cap that works with the shield

Anyone compared Neg vs Slide film with this camera?

The exposure is made when the string is released . You can vary the degrees in your pano, by pulling out the string only part of the way. I use that technique to avoid getting myself in the shot, if I don't want a 360 pano. (Alternatively, you can hold the camera straight and rotate the handle, to get different types of shots, if that interests you. Check out the Lomography website for more info on this.)

I scan my own negatives with sprockets, using a modified 35 mm scanning mask, also sold by the Lomography shop. It was a worthwhile investment for me, as I have several toy cameras that can expose on the sprockets of 35 mm film. Alternatively, you can take a scanning mask designed for 120 film and modify it to allow you to hold the 35 mm negatives off the glass while you scan.

So far, I haven't had problems with developing. I just tell them when I drop off the film that it was shot with a toy pano camera, and the images will look funny. Just develop please, no scanning or prints. And if in doubt about where to cut the negatives, please don't... The first time, they didn't cut the images. After that, they have and so far, no mistakes.

No lens cap, but the lens hood is permanently attached so provides protection. You can always fashion your own homemade lens cap or a homemade splitzer to allow spliced exposures.

I haven't run slide film through mine yet, but perhaps I'll try it next summer.