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The New Nikon D7000: Simply Amazing

         

In August 2008, Nikon changed the landscape of DSLR technology with the introduction of the Nikon D90, the world's first DSLR to offer HD video capture. Fast-forward two years and Nikon is once again churning the soil with the Nikon D7000, a new DSLR that ups the ante as per what serious shooters will be expecting from camera manufacturers from here on out.


Nikon's D7000 features a new 16.2-megapixel DX (APS-C) format CMOS sensor, backed by Nikon's new EXPEED 2 imaging processor, which can capture up to 100 still images (14-bit A/D conversion) at speeds up to 6 frames per second. Add to this 50-millisecond shutter response times, an all new 39-point Multi-Cam 4800DX AF module with 9 center cross-type sensors configurable in combinations of 9, 21, 39 or a 21-point ring configuration to match any number of shooting situations and a new 2,016-pixel RGB 3D Matrix Metering system for deadly accurate exposures.

But the biggest breakthrough has to do with video capture, which in the case of Nikon's D7000, boils down to full 1080p HD video WITH FULL-TIME AF and MANUAL CONTROL. In addition to full-time autofocus, the D7000 also features variable frame rates and resolution, 1080p recording at a cinema-like 24 fps, or for Web use, 720p at a choice of 24 or 30 fps for clips up to 20 minutes long.

Other video-recording features include face priority tracking for up to 35 faces, subject tracking and normal or wide-area autofocus. The D7000 also offers you the time-saving option of editing and trimming video clips in-camera in order to save post-production processing time. And yes, there's a stereo input jack as well as the ability to use wireless or hotshoe-mounted microphones for pro-quality sound. In a nutshell, Nikon's D7000 simply shatters all competitors in its class.


Nikon's D7000... simply amazing!

In terms of construction, the D7000 is equally up to par and features weather-resistant magnesium-alloy construction with silicon seals all around. The layout of the D7000 camera controls and command dials have been reconfigured to enable quicker, more intuitive on-the-fly camera operation. Along with a bright optical viewing system that affords 100% of the total viewing area, the D7000 also features a 3.0", 921,000-dot LCD with Live View (and 100% viewing area) for real-time composing, viewing and editing of stills and video. 

The newest pro-level Nikon has a native ISO range of 100 to 6400 and can be extended upwards to an equivalent of ISO 25,600 in Hi-2 mode when shooting under extremely low-light conditions. For recording stills and video, the D7000 features dual SD/SDHC/SDXC-compatible card slots that can be configured to record your efforts in several variations including separate JPEG, RAW and/or movie files. As for power, the D7000 is equally up to par and features a new EN-EL15 lithium-ion battery that's good for up to 1,050 shots per charge.

As one would expect, the D7000 can capture JPEGs, RAW or a combination of RAW+JPEG, and RAW files can be processed in-camera along with special effects from the camera's Retouch menu, which includes color filters, distortion controls for fisheye effects, perspective control and a new sketch filter that renders sketch-style imagery, all of which are saved as separate new files, leaving the original files unaltered. In addition to these creative filters, the Nikon D7000 also includes a full roster of Scene Modes and color-rendition filters.

The new Nikon D7000 is available as a body only or with an AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 ED VR lens, and is expected to be in stock by mid-October, 2010.

And without a doubt, we look forward to conducting a full hands-on review of this neat machine as soon as one comes our way.

Note - The Nikon D7000 hasn't shipped yet, but we are accepting orders.

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NEED IT! while this is open, why is the d700 more expensive but this one seems better

B&H, cuenten con mi compra.

Ah, y a todos los brillantes posteadores que dicen merecer un mejor desempeño de la cámara en video, les digo: cómprense una cámara de video por $25.000, obtengan una imagen que supere la de ésta cámara (no lo creo) y pónganse a grabar todas las horas y horas de recuerdos familiares que quieran, aunque no sean capaces de verlos nunca. ¡Dejen de postear estupideces!

B & H, have my purchase.

Oh, and to all the bright posters that say deserve a better camera performance on video, I say, buy yourself a video camera for $ 25,000, get an image that exceeds that of this camera (not do) and get to record all hours and hours of family memories that you want, but not be able to see them ever. Stop posting crap!

Mike Strong,

Wow, that's quite a rant.  If you need "unlimited" video, buy a video camera.  Canon SLR's don't do "unlimited" video and neither does any other SLR.  How long do you need your videos to be?  Like 2-3 hours or maybe 6-8 hours?  Buy a video camera if you're so into video.

If you demand nothing less than 1920x1080 video, don't buy a Canon SLR - they still offer less than that (because that's what customers want!).  You seem very centered on video... not sure why you're wasting time with SLR's.

Concerning lenses - Nikon offers some of the best functionality out there for past lenses with their newer cameras and they've done very well on that for decades. However, just as you couldn't modify your film SLR into a digital one, sometimes you have to bite the bullet and buy new things to stay with the times - and that means lenses too.

In any case stop grinding your teeth, switch to Canon already and quit your whining.  Nobody is forcing you to give money to Nikon.  If you think DX is a bastard size and love Canon's even smaller APC-S format, go for it.  Or, buy a full frame Canon, a bunch of lenses and get busy.  You are not stuck anywhere - you just need to figure out what you want (and try to keep it in the realm of possibility), and then do it and be happy.

Anonymous wrote:

Mike Strong,

Wow, that's quite a rant.  If you need "unlimited" video, buy a video camera.  Canon SLR's don't do "unlimited" video and neither does any other SLR.  How long do you need your videos to be?  Like 2-3 hours or maybe 6-8 hours?  Buy a video camera if you're so into video.

If you demand nothing less than 1920x1080 video, don't buy a Canon SLR - they still offer less than that (because that's what customers want!).  You seem very centered on video... not sure why you're wasting time with SLR's.

Concerning lenses - Nikon offers some of the best functionality out there for past lenses with their newer cameras and they've done very well on that for decades. However, just as you couldn't modify your film SLR into a digital one, sometimes you have to bite the bullet and buy new things to stay with the times - and that means lenses too.

In any case stop grinding your teeth, switch to Canon already and quit your whining.  Nobody is forcing you to give money to Nikon.  If you think DX is a bastard size and love Canon's even smaller APC-S format, go for it.  Or, buy a full frame Canon, a bunch of lenses and get busy.  You are not stuck anywhere - you just need to figure out what you want (and try to keep it in the realm of possibility), and then do it and be happy.

Oops, I forgot to respond to your wide aperture lens complaint - Nikon makes very many of them.  Okay, they don't make a 50mm f0.4 or a 200mm f1.0, but if they did you couldn't afford them anyway... but what good would they be with the increased ISO capability in today's digital sensors?  Ten years ago who would have thought that you could shoot at ISO 102,400?  They would have mocked you if you mentioned it.  Today some idiot with a 200mm f8.0 can get better quality low light pictures than a pro could 10 years ago with a huge (and incredibly expensive) 200mm f1.0 (that doesn't exist anyway).  In a few years we'll see ISO 505,600, and it won't have anything to do with fast lenses.

If you can't achieve what you intend with technology that actually exists I suggest you choose another hobby or profession. Along the way it might be good for you to learn something about optics and what's possible given a certain physical size limitation.  There are basic reasons why you can't hook an observatory onto your SLR and walk around with it.

I am still irritated at Nikon. I've used Nikon since 1967 and my old lenses from back then still work on my DSLRs (most of the time) though that backward compatibility has suffered of late. Back then Canon was the one which changed its lens mounts causing massive disruption in people's systems, whole cameras and lens systems were trashed. What a mess if you had bought heavily into Canon.

But Canon has been kicking their rears for some years now and Nikon doesn't seem to bother either truly matching  Canon's machines or putting their own better handling (my thinking) or coming up with their own innovations.

I agree fully with another poster here who thinks it is the marketing people not the white-coat folks. Penny-wise and multi-pound stupid marketing decisions. I am ready to jump ship because this camera tells me that Nikon still hasn't gotten the message. No more agonizing baby steps in the general direction of the better competition, please. I just grind my teeth.

First, video - keep the 24ps but give me 30 and better. Never give me less than 1920x1080 and allow unlimited record times. The 4-gigabyte limit is baloney. Other machines I have (video cams) get around the FAT-32 limit by continuing the recording by starting a new clip everytime they get to 4-gigs. Then the clips are combined on the timeline in the NLE.

Besides - there is nothing sacred about 24fps. It was originally a compromise between the number of frames needed for smooth motion and good sound versus the cost of film. A lot of what we call that "look" is as much motion blur as it is film's tonal range and density-curve charecteristics.

To view film without a strobing or flickering effect we need to see it at about 50-projections per second so each frame is show either 2 or 3 times before moving by using a double or triple shutter in the project causing 48 or 72 flashes per second. The continuous movement sense is called near apparent motion. The other part of 24fps is film-envy when all film festivals were all film and most film festivals were all film and so forth. Now, I think most are video. It just makes more sense. Same for shooting. There is really no longer any reason to shoot film. Too much money and too few options.

I am so, so, so, so .... (you go the idea) tired of being nickel and dimed and short-sheeted by cheap Nikon marketers thinking that they are holding on to value. They are just losing customers like crazy to Canon, how does that help the fools. Give me a real machine for my needs and don't think that somehow you are giving away the store. If you give me a decent machine, Nikon marketers, you might just make inroads back to the top of the pack. Otherwise you are losing people like me who've stuck with you first from long time loyalty to a camera which took care of its customers (once, long ago) and now only because we haven't wanted to buy all new lenses sets again.

But the way Nikon has changed lense support (not all lenses on all cameras) and with zooms so good and with the refusal to have truly wide-aperture lenses as standard (I feel that lense apertures haven't gotten out of the 1940s or 1950s) that argument is far less pursuasive than it used to be. It is just embarrasing to be out  with a second-rate camera next to a first rate camera. Like, why am I stuck here? So that will change for me if Nikon doesn't change. I'm out of patience. Too, too many years waiting. I'm feeling really foolish for having stuck with Nikon so long.

Then there is that full-frame FX versus DX which I've always considered a sort of bastard size based on technical limits of the time. Some of that is melting away with changes in sensors but it is still irritating that Nikon doesn't do more in FX.

The D7000 looks nice...but I rather keep my D90...it does the job really well, especially with a 50mm lens...

I wonder what will be its price and release date in Brazil.

Una maravilla de camara, yo tengo la D90, es muy buena y no es problematica, si muchas otras camaras no la alcanzaban en calidad, creo que con esta nueva D7000 menos lo haran en este segmento de camaras, en horabuena por Nikon y por nosotros los usuarios que adoramos sus camaras, saludos desde Mexico, B&H en cuanto tenga el suficiente dinero les comprare una de esas D7000

Some quick comments on some of the posts so far:

A. It's unfortunate that the 7000 doesn't support real video HD frame rates like 60p. 

"60p" is not a "real" video frame rate (for HD nor for SD).  60i, 50i, and 24p are.

Currently, most DSLRs and point and shoot cameras that shoot progressive video at a higher frame rate than the frame rate used for playback (commonly 24fps, 30fps or 25fps) do so for slow motion effects and, while doing so, shoot at a smaller frame size (1280x 720 or smaller and sometimes much, much smaller like 320x240).

While it might be nice to have a camera that shoots video at twice the frame rate (60p) as the required field rate (60i) for interlace viewing, it's not a show stopper.

B. Why are there set clip lengths?

Until a Nikon tech chimes in, I'll have to take a best guess at this one.

The clips recorded in any DSLR take up disk space (no surprizes there) and the storage media used to store the files has a maximum file size per file.  Most likely, at 20 minutes, clips recorded in this Nikon are at this size (somewhere from 1GB to 2GB to 4GB).

Of course, if shooting to a 8GB or 16GB card, one would think that the product would offer a mode that just continues shooting to another clip.

If I remember correctly, the Canon t2i stops at 10 minutes.  When purchasing a tapeless video recorder, it's always important to check the maximum clip length (especially if you're accustomed to being able to record 60 to 90 minutes to tape).

Wait... tape?  What's that.  LOL.

-Warren

this will a great back up for my D700

Only marketting.  Just like Microsoft!!! Brand new OS with many problems!!!

 I found a couple great reviews with video and pics. My fav is Chase Jarvis.  Checkout the article below and high res pics from the shoot.  The short film is from the D7000 as well.  He even puts one on a model plane, WILD!

http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2010/09/nikon-d7000/

 Yes BH you have my order!

Oh and yes BH you  will have my second Nikon camera purchase from me as soon as the D7000 is available! :-) 

Cnet has a good comparable chart here as well.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-20016377-1.html?tag=rb_content;carou...

And Dpreview has a 7 page detailed write up as well. 

http://www.dpreview.com/previews/nikond7000/

Will  it  come  with a  MACRO  LENS  for  close  up  work  ???

And  what  Price,  for  the  Camera  and  Lens  ???

Will  accept  Your  approximations.

Thanks in anticipation

what is the price ?

and what does it compare to?

with thanks

1. what is the price of this Nikon and

2.what other camera may you compare it to?

Await your reply with thanks!

 I notice the AE/AF lock button is slammed right against you nose again, I wonder if the the new sensor blows away highlights as badly as my D90. I am a stills photographer and have no interest in any of the video features, I would rather see an update to the F6 than all this digital fetish stuff.

I'll wait for the full-frame, D800. 

this is awesome news for a Nikon photographer like me, I have been longing for better HD video features on Nikon DSLRs to compete with that of Canon's - maybe now's the time?

P.S.  I know -  it`s "semi"....  I  told  you  -   I`m  Russian...

Hi, Photo Guys.  "...I can`t wait till they include a cell phone and a GPS on the next model...? " - Exactly !  " ...Time to get on board with the program...? "- Absolutely true.   I  shoot D80- beautifull camera, then bought D700 - learning and enjoying it. Now I`m getting semy-pro HDvideo Hard Drive Camcorder- Sony or Panasonic. Is that a bad program to get on board with ?  And it doesn`t put any strain on Nikon...

I`m not a pro, not semy-pro, just photofooling around amateur. One more thing - let`s be very polite with each other...

Thank U Guys for very interesting comments ,

                                                        Russian Guy

Read The DPReview....It will answer most of your questions.

http://forums.dpreview.com/news/1009/10091515nikond7000.asp

Ok need to see pics in the 2500-6400 iso range.. 

Alex G. wrote:

 Is there anything that D300 does that this little gem doesn't - outside of more focus points on the D300 maybe?

In other words, is this the replacement for D300(s), or is there one in the pipeline?

This is the replacement for the d90, you can tell by the price and the fact it has various shooting modes, Auto, Manual, Aperture, Speed, Program, and so on. the d7000 does not have a pc sync and other available features that the D300 has

Here's the link to the 7000 if you haven't seen it:

www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Digital-SLR/25468/D7000.html 

If I were going to pull the trigger, which I am "smirk", I will pick up this camera when it becomes available.  I already have a D2x which performs well for my type of shooting (sports, studio strobes, 5x7 prints, etc.), but I do not have video capability and this is a real contender.  I would like a D3s but I think a D4(something) with 1080p autofocus video will be out next year. I can wait.

Yawn.
A few more megapixels, a better movie camera, and of course price back up to $1200.00 like the D90 and the D80 before that.
If I want a movie camera I’ll get one, and it will do a better job that this does. Drop this fad based crap about the movie mode! Nikon needs to stay serious about still photography and get back to when they were leading the industry not following behind every fad.
Where is the FX format camera? This is what serious still photographers want.

Canon 60d or Nikon d7000???

pros & cons???

This puppy/baby you call uses Sony's a55 sensor as most Nikon cameras do which buys sensors from sony and packs it into their cameras. As in dpreview wrote: “All of these pixels are packed onto a newly developed CMOS sensor, which is almost certainly the same or very similar to that in the Sony Alpha SLT-A55.”  can't wait to see deep comparisons between the two.

Wait until Sony a77 comes.. (early 2011)

As many have already said, Why not an FX sensor? The D700 has a full sensor but has 12.1 MP. Canon, on the other hand, has a 21.3 MP DSLR in the same price range. Why?

Peter M wrote:

As many have already said, Why not an FX sensor? The D700 has a full sensor but has 12.1 MP. Canon, on the other hand, has a 21.3 MP DSLR in the same price range. Why?

The D7000 is meant to replace the D90, which is a DX camera. There are 4 other model categories sitting above the D7000, 3 of which are FX cameras (D300s, D700, D3s, and D3x).  Nikon updates it's cameras one at a time. Just because what you're looking for is not in the D7000 doesn't mean it will not be offered. Wait for the D700 upgrade.

Alex G. wrote:

dannyboyster wrote:

...3 of which are FX cameras (D300s, D700, D3s, and D3x).

D300 doesn't have a full frame censor last time I looked at it... So it's a DX camera, right?

dude.. he SAID THREE, not ALL FOUR that he listed! Come one people... Just a LITTLE.. LITTLE ATTENTION TO DETAIL.. goes a LONG LONG way..

300s=DX  3s/700/3x=FX   (that equals 3 FX and 1 DX)

I am amazed everyday.

Peter M wrote:

As many have already said, Why not an FX sensor? The D700 has a full sensor but has 12.1 MP. Canon, on the other hand, has a 21.3 MP DSLR in the same price range. Why?

Two different questions.  The answer to the second one is obvious if you've used both.  First camera has better DR and lots of headroom in RAW, the second one not so much.  Second one has more resolution as you point out, but slightly worse high ISO noise performance, and previously mentioned DR and RAW headroom deficiencies.  Especially if you like to push low ISO shadows up, D700 beats the 5DMkII quite easily.

D700 also has a much newer/better AF system, and is just a better low-light tool in general.

VERY NICE, BUT WHY DOES EVERY SINGLE NIKON CAMERA HAVE TO HAVE A DIFFERANT FREAKING BATTERY AND FLASH, WHY CAN'T ALL NIKON PRODUCTS BE COMPATIBLE TOGETHER!!!

DENIS wrote:

VERY NICE, BUT WHY DOES EVERY SINGLE NIKON CAMERA HAVE TO HAVE A DIFFERANT FREAKING BATTERY AND FLASH, WHY CAN'T ALL NIKON PRODUCTS BE COMPATIBLE TOGETHER!!!

i've been talkin about gettin compatible together for years now, but nobody's been listening or takin me seriously. especially the batteries.

at least nikon's been making good cameras. give 'em credit for that!

rodney king wrote:

DENIS wrote:

VERY NICE, BUT WHY DOES EVERY SINGLE NIKON CAMERA HAVE TO HAVE A DIFFERANT FREAKING BATTERY AND FLASH, WHY CAN'T ALL NIKON PRODUCTS BE COMPATIBLE TOGETHER!!!

THEY WANT US TO SPEND, SPEND, SPEND!!!

GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!

i've been talkin about gettin compatible together for years now, but nobody's been listening or takin me seriously. especially the batteries.

at least nikon's been making good cameras. give 'em credit for that!

DENIS wrote:

VERY NICE, BUT WHY DOES EVERY SINGLE NIKON CAMERA HAVE TO HAVE A DIFFERANT FREAKING BATTERY AND FLASH, WHY CAN'T ALL NIKON PRODUCTS BE COMPATIBLE TOGETHER!!!

So true, they have the best in a standardized lens mounting system but all the accessories, batteries, flashes are different. Makes no sense except to make more money and that is very short sighted for  a company that prides itself on continuity.

DENIS wrote:

VERY NICE, BUT WHY DOES EVERY SINGLE NIKON CAMERA HAVE TO HAVE A DIFFERANT FREAKING BATTERY AND FLASH, WHY CAN'T ALL NIKON PRODUCTS BE COMPATIBLE TOGETHER!!!

thats why they are getting killed by CANON  nikon is too money hungry.

It's nice to see Nikon starting to catch up video-wise, but at this late in the game this should have been a full frame camera. This is just another crop sensor camera with 1080p video, Canon has a bunch of them. I want Nikon up to speed (the LENSES certainly are!), but until then, my 5D Mark II remains the only FF camera with 1080p HD video which means incredible low-light video imagery and 14mm really being 14mm. C'mon Nikon, get up to speed!

One mo' thing:  the D90 was plagued with severe problems, i.e. the shutter freezing and getting the errr message, or taking totally black shots.  Is it possible for you to test this out when you do a more in-depth review?

dahlias80 wrote:

One mo' thing:  the D90 was plagued with severe problems, i.e. the shutter freezing and getting the errr message, or taking totally black shots.  Is it possible for you to test this out when you do a more in-depth review?

I have the D90 and have never had these problems.

i love to see this go up agenst  the new pentax k-5 i am in the market to buy my first dslr i am torn between these 2

Can I use the same batteries on the D90 for the new D7000?

dahlias80 wrote:

Can I use the same batteries on the D90 for the new D7000?

Nope.. Tech specs are on nikonusa.com.  I looked 'cuz I have a few for my D90.  The 7000 uses the EN EL15.

Here's the link to the 7000: http://www.nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Digital-SLR/25468/D7000.html

Love Nikon but this is not for me....if I want a movie camera I will buy one. Put that money into making the still camera better, not adding more stuff that is not dedicated to still photography.  I can't wait till they include a cell phone and a GPS on the next model.

.... putting the price up with this post would sure have been nice for those who are interested in it.   This article says the body only is $1199.

Anonymous wrote:

Love Nikon but this is not for me....if I want a movie camera I will buy one. Put that money into making the still camera better, not adding more stuff that is not dedicated to still photography.  I can't wait till they include a cell phone and a GPS on the next model.

Wahhhhh.  Get with the program.  Video recording is here to stay in consumer DSLRs.  If you want a camera without video, soon your only choice will be a pro body.  Then you can truly be dedicated to still photography.

" If I want a video camera I will buy one."  If you want a video camera that can deliver the quality of 1080p footage you can capture with this body and the full variety of SLR lenses, take a stroll over to the video section and let me know how much you need to spend.  You are getting near to the best of both worlds in this body which you can have for a price lower than what you would have paid for a D300 when it came out.

Progression of Technology.  Time to get on board with the program.

Well Nikon has finally roped me in. My latest camera is the Canon EOS 40D (and its predecessors) and I've always romanticized about Nikon after my ex-wife invested almost $1,000 on a traditional film Nikon in the late 1970's. I kept waiting and alas, the Holy Grail has finally looked favorably on Nikon and blessed her with a serious competitor to Canon. Scary times we live in! ;)

If Canon is smart  it will add Full-Time AF to the 7D and 60D. Methinks it's firmwarely possible.

 I have a D-90. I'm an event videographer. The D-90 is used for stills and as a backup when I need a 4th video recorder. I find myself needing it for video pretty often these days but I'm completely handycapped by the maximum allowable clip length. 20 minutes at low resolution and 5 at 720P. I have to babysit the camera and its a nightmare in post. 

I see the D7000 will allow up to 20 minutes at 720p and I assume even less time at 1080p. Still not good enough. I need to be able to stick it on a tripod and let it roll for an hour +. 

Maybe I'm missing something here. Are these the same type CMOS sensors used in high end video cameras? Why are there set clip lengths? 

It is a limitation of the software running the cameras, they have not moved beyond using the FAT file system, which has a 4gb limit on file sizes - so it is not limited by recording time (though some due to heat) but by the file size. So a sofware rewrite using a newer file system that can create larger file sizes is required. And they are definitly not the same CMOS censors as high end vid cameras...

George Ross wrote:

I see the D7000 will allow up to 20 minutes at 720p and I assume even less time at 1080p. Still not good enough. I need to be able to stick it on a tripod and let it roll for an hour +. 

Maybe I'm missing something here. Are these the same type CMOS sensors used in high end video cameras? Why are there set clip lengths? 

Then why don't you just use a VIDEO camera?

George Ross wrote:

 I have a D-90. I'm an event videographer. The D-90 is used for stills and as a backup when I need a 4th video recorder. I find myself needing it for video pretty often these days but I'm completely handycapped by the maximum allowable clip length. 20 minutes at low resolution and 5 at 720P. I have to babysit the camera and its a nightmare in post. 

I see the D7000 will allow up to 20 minutes at 720p and I assume even less time at 1080p. Still not good enough. I need to be able to stick it on a tripod and let it roll for an hour +. 

Maybe I'm missing something here. Are these the same type CMOS sensors used in high end video cameras? Why are there set clip lengths? 

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