Nikon CoolPix S8100

Share

Daytrippers looking for an able bodied, pocket-sized digicam that packs a combination of high levels of resolving power, a broad focal range, HD video capability and impressively fast burst rates in a stylish, yet serious-looking package should take a close look at the Nikon CoolPix S8100.


Nikon's CoolPix S8100 features a 12.1-megapixel 1/2.3" CMOS sensor, which is supported by Nikon's latest-generation image processor, the EXPEED C2. Extremes seem to be the theme with this pocket rocket, starting with a 10x, 5.4 to 54mm Nikkor zoom lens (10 elements in 8 groups), which emulates the field of view of a 30 to 300mm lens on a 35mm camera, with close focusing down to 0.4" (1cm) from the front lens element. The theme continues in the burst-rate department, which according to the specs, tops out at up to 5 full-resolution JPEGs per second.


Nikon's CoolPix S8100 is available in black, silver and red.

For composing, viewing and editing stills and video, which by the way, can be recorded with stereo sound at 1080p with a touch of the Record button, the Nikon CoolPix S8100 features a bright 3", 921,000-dot  Clear Color LCD, which displays 100% of the total viewing area and allows for 5 levels of brightness adjustment.

Image shake is kept in check via the S8100s four-way VR Image Stabilization System, which employs a combination of lens shift and ISO boosting up to an equivalent of ISO 3200 (from a native sensitivity of ISO 160) to better ensure sharp stills and video.  

Other standard features found on the Nikon CoolPix S8100 include a Smart Portrait System, which incorporates a Smile Timer that will only trigger the shutter when your subjct smiles, In-Camera Red-Eye fix, Face-Priority AF, which can detect up to 12 faces within each scene, three levels of Skin Softening for flattering pix of the women folk in your life and Blink Warning, which alerts you if anyone blinked their eyes during the exposure.

There's also a choice of 17 Scene Modes, which adjust the camera settings to best match your subject matter, as well as a Scene Auto Selector, which chooses the best shooting mode automatically.

The Nikon CoolPix S8100 powers off a rechargeable EN-EL12 lithium-ion battery, which is good for up to about 210 exposures per charge, or about 1 hour and 20 minutes of video recording. In addition to approximately 102MB of internal memory, images can be recorded to your choice of SD, SDHC or SDXC memory cards.

Add new comment

Wow, an S8100 right on the heels of the S8000?  I had read a lot of complaints about a high pitched sound that is present in video recordings in the S8000.  I wonder if they threw the baby out with the bath water and just introduced the new model to move off from that flaw...

Anonymous wrote:

Wow, an S8100 right on the heels of the S8000?  I had read a lot of complaints about a high pitched sound that is present in video recordings in the S8000.  I wonder if they threw the baby out with the bath water and just introduced the new model to move off from that flaw...

Im wondering if Nikon S8100 has the ability of apreture,shutter prioretery and manual focusing. It will be then my favorite one among Canon SD4500IS ,Fujifilm F80EXR , Sony H55 and others.

We bought a S8000 from crutchfield earlier in Feb. and promptly returned it when finding this high pitched noise on ALL of our recordings with it.  My father in law could not hear the pitch - there is a known frequency range that most adults cannot hear any longer.  He where's a hearing aid already, so I don't think he can hear it.  Google "Mosquito high pitch" and you'll find plenty about things exploiting the fact that adults cannot hear in this range frequently.  Unfortunately both my wife & I can and it annoyed the heck out of us in this camera!

Anonymous wrote:

Wow, an S8100 right on the heels of the S8000?  I had read a lot of complaints about a high pitched sound that is present in video recordings in the S8000.  I wonder if they threw the baby out with the bath water and just introduced the new model to move off from that flaw...

Im wondering if it has aperture prior. , shutter prior. and manual focusing.

i need to know the price?

It seems to me it will be my first choice among others.

I like this camera and hope it has the aperture prior. ,shutter prior. and manual focusing. I founded it is cheaper than it s sister Canon SD4500IS.

 i hope it's not too noisy, tolerable, because i can't stand the cripples canon produced this year. i'm ok with fully auto mode, as long as iq is good or very acceptable for a cam with this tiny sensor - high pixel density. doubt it has any manual controls, maybe iso. also very expensive, not worth 300 unless it does something amazing that we don't know yet. 

Anonymous wrote:

 i hope it's not too noisy, tolerable, because i can't stand the cripples canon produced this year. i'm ok with fully auto mode, as long as iq is good or very acceptable for a cam with this tiny sensor - high pixel density. doubt it has any manual controls, maybe iso. also very expensive, not worth 300 unless it does something amazing that we don't know yet. 

There all $300 anymore with the CMOS sensor and 10x or higher zoom.  Sony dsc hx5 is $349, Canon sx cost $299 and does not have a CMOS.  Samy is $349 and so on.  Without the higher end sensor for speed and low light these would cost around $249 or less.  I'm sure Nikon ditched the 8000 because of it's flaws and not being able to compete in this arena.  So we will see if this new and improved version test out well.  I do like the specs and the CMOS sensor.  Time will tell. 

Anyone out there purchased this camera yet?  Wonder how it performs before I shell out $300.  It looks good on paper.  Only wish it had a wider angle lens on par with the competition around 25mm would have been nice with a 12x optical for the long shots.  Also, panoramic in camera stitch would be a nice touch.  One thing that is most important overall is photo quality.  Crisp, clear, accurate colors across all focal lengths is key for me.

Anyone tested this baby yet?????

Anonymous wrote:

Anyone out there purchased this camera yet? 

Anyone tested this baby yet?????

After doing my comparison homework, I purchased and worked with the S8100 for a week. It was going to replace my aging Sony DSC-T30 subcompact I've used for travel for years... but the Sony now has dust bunnies on the sensor, so I'm having to correct/clone in post-processing. My everyday gear is my Nikon D90/lenses.

I liked almost everything about the S8100 the more I played with it. The 10x optical reach is nice, and I saw little barrel distortion. I knew going in the S8100 doesn't have ap- or shutter-priority, but never realized none of the slew of presets/scene modes includes "high-speed shutter". When I use my travel camera, sometimes I'm shooting from a moving ship/boat/plane/train/vehicle, so I need to freeze motion more than internal optical/mechanical VR can handle. There's IS a "Food" preset included in the mix, which Nikon engineers must think is important in this class of camera instead of a high-speed shutter preset.

I thought maybe I'd missed something in the menus or owner's manual. I contacted Nikon tech support, and their answer was "use burst mode". According to the manual, though, that meant sacrificing file sizes because the internal firmware forces lower file sizes as it loads-up the internal buffer with multiple shots. The best answer I got on several Nikon web forums was "push the ISO artificially high", which sounded good, but that's going to introduce extra noise, so I didn't like that option either. Nobody gave me a work-around that was the equivalent of a one-button preset so I could get to it quickly and then reset quickly to "normal" shooting mode.

Unfortunately, that was a deal killer for me for my own use as a travel camera, and I returned my S8100 for a refund. I'll deal with the Sony's dust bunnies until Nikon provides a high-speed shutter capability/preset in one of the next versions of the S8100. In my mind, right now there's just not anything else out there in this form factor that is as otherwise versitile as the S8100.

Just talked with Nikon and found out that this new S8100 will not work with a remote! Boo...Hoo....gotta have a remote!  Seems like such a small thing to ask that they add a wireless remote to work with it! Guess we'll wait for S8200.  Maybe they'll consider it then.