Nikon D7000: Camera Road Test With Chase Jarvis

Share

Chase takes us for a spin with the brand spanking new Nikon D7000! Here is an excerpt and video from Chases blog:

"A while back I got call from the Nikon mothership which put the very first HDdSLR–the Nikon D90 – into my hands months before the world had seen that technology. I won’t ever forget that experience. That little camera kicked off this whole craze of photo and video convergence that we’re swimming in today.

Well…lo and behold, a few months ago I got another one of those calls from Nikon. “Chase-san. We have a new camera…” I love those calls. And so today I’m again excited to share with you another new camera that will get its moment in the spotlight next week at Photokina: the Nikon D7000."

Click here to preorder the Nikon D7000.

For more from Chase go to www.chasejarvis.com

Add new comment

Copy editor:

One doesn't "swim" in a craze (see middle paragraph). The metaphor, as presented, is awkward and doesn't work. Anyone awake there? Perhaps try "That little camera opened the flood gates of this whole photo/video stream that we’re swimming in today."

unregistered wrote:

Copy editor:

One doesn't "swim" in a craze (see middle paragraph). The metaphor, as presented, is awkward and doesn't work. Anyone awake there? Perhaps try "That little camera opened the flood gates of this whole photo/video stream that we’re swimming in today."

Really? A hands-on look at a camera that's not yet available, and that's what you take away from it? Sometimes I wonder about people. Or perhaps I should say, "Sometimes I wonder about the people swimming around in this crazy stream of a world that we live in."

I'm surprised you didn't write "this crazy craze of a world that we live in." There's more to communication than just new gear and pictures. Language is an art, too, that doesn't need to be neglected just because ground-breaking new technology is available at B&H.

Come on, you fellows! You are dwelling on very static aspects of the English language. Surprise, surprise. That language is going through a makeover faster than you can explain it's petty nuances and metaphors. Language has to evolve and that evolution serves mostly one purpose - communication, not necessarily the art of! I understood her point on the very first take!!!!

unregistered wrote:

Come on, you fellows! You are dwelling on very static aspects of the English language. Surprise, surprise. That language is going through a makeover faster than you can explain it's petty nuances and metaphors. Language has to evolve and that evolution serves mostly one purpose - communication, not necessarily the art of! I understood her point on the very first take!!!!

I am compelled to agree with the orignal poster here. Even though I have been reassigned and do not edit the social media and guest posts on this blog anymore, I think that good language, like good photography, is in the composition and details. Yes, the language evolves and words and concepts take on new meaning every day, but there do exist certain parameters in the language and its use that remain constant. It's not all free-form. Without these guidelines, we would be reduced to a babbling horde, which I am not entirely convinced we aren't already.

To take the stance that these are "petty nuances and metaphors" is the difference, if I may borrow a phrase used by a colleague here today, between creating a fine etching and using a 12-inch paint roller.

It's all about nuance. For those who don't agree, perhaps the Instant Messaging environment would be a more appropriate stream in which to swim.

And by the way, I do hope everyone enjoys Chase Jarvis's hands-on review of the new Nikon D7000!

Tell ya what I am enjoying - the write up of the D7000 on the B&H website! I love it! 

unregistered wrote:

Tell ya what I am enjoying - the write up of the D7000 on the B&H website! I love it! 

Comments such as these we love to read!

 Amazing video, great content, footage, and editing.  What type of helicopter is used for this shoot? (model name and #)