Nikon D7000: Camera Road Test With Chase Jarvis

         

Chase takes us for a spin with the brand spanking new Nikon D7000! Here is an excerpt and video from Chases blog:

"A while back I got call from the Nikon mothership which put the very first HDdSLR–the Nikon D90 – into my hands months before the world had seen that technology. I won’t ever forget that experience. That little camera kicked off this whole craze of photo and video convergence that we’re swimming in today.

Well…lo and behold, a few months ago I got another one of those calls from Nikon. “Chase-san. We have a new camera…” I love those calls. And so today I’m again excited to share with you another new camera that will get its moment in the spotlight next week at Photokina: the Nikon D7000."

Click here to preorder the Nikon D7000.

For more from Chase go to www.chasejarvis.com

Discussion 7

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 Amazing video, great content, footage, and editing.  What type of helicopter is used for this shoot? (model name and #) 

Tell ya what I am enjoying - the write up of the D7000 on the B&H website! I love it! 

unregistered wrote:

Tell ya what I am enjoying - the write up of the D7000 on the B&H website! I love it! 

Comments such as these we love to read!

Come on, you fellows! You are dwelling on very static aspects of the English language. Surprise, surprise. That language is going through a makeover faster than you can explain it's petty nuances and metaphors. Language has to evolve and that evolution serves mostly one purpose - communication, not necessarily the art of! I understood her point on the very first take!!!!

I'm surprised you didn't write "this crazy craze of a world that we live in." There's more to communication than just new gear and pictures. Language is an art, too, that doesn't need to be neglected just because ground-breaking new technology is available at B&H.

Copy editor:

One doesn't "swim" in a craze (see middle paragraph). The metaphor, as presented, is awkward and doesn't work. Anyone awake there? Perhaps try "That little camera opened the flood gates of this whole photo/video stream that we’re swimming in today."

unregistered wrote:

Copy editor:

One doesn't "swim" in a craze (see middle paragraph). The metaphor, as presented, is awkward and doesn't work. Anyone awake there? Perhaps try "That little camera opened the flood gates of this whole photo/video stream that we’re swimming in today."

Really? A hands-on look at a camera that's not yet available, and that's what you take away from it? Sometimes I wonder about people. Or perhaps I should say, "Sometimes I wonder about the people swimming around in this crazy stream of a world that we live in."