Liquid-Cooled CyberpowerPCs Push the Limits

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Speed is an attractive feature whether you're looking to recalculate a massive spreadsheet or drive a souped-up roadster along a virtual racetrack. The trouble is that an over-clocked PC tends to overheat. Enter CyberpowerPC, a company that has mastered the art of manufacturing desktop and gaming systems with built-in liquid cooling.

With one model available in the $600 range and another below $900, these prices are less than you'd pay for a custom PC. And that's totally cool.

The Gamer LiquidCool U101 desktop computer runs at 2.8GHz using an AMD Athlon II X4 630 Quad-Core processor. The Gamer LiquidCool X101 desktop computer operates at 3.3GHz with an Intel Core i5-660 Dual-Core CPU. The former is supplemented by an ATI Radeon 5450 graphics card with 1GB  of memory for mind-blowing 3D gaming performance; the latter by an nVIDIA GeForce GT 240 graphics card with 1GB of memory for breath-stealing 3D gaming performance. In both cases the liquid cooling system ensures that the computer won't overheat during intensive gaming sessions.

The U101 is equipped with a 420-watt power supply; the X101, a whopping 600W supply. The former contains a 500GB hard drive; the latter a 750GB drive. The U101 has six USB 2.0 ports; the X101, 12, and one FireWire-400.

Both systems come loaded with Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit), which provides a stable operating platform for games and is chock-full of multimedia features. See Free "Windows Live Essentials" Upgrade Adds Movie Maker, Photo Fuse and More.

Beyond the liquid cooling, CyberpowerPC models are cabled for efficient air flow. There are up to six case fans per computer. Temperature display and control options for thermal management are provided.

So, if you're ready to rumble, check out the speedsters from CyberpowerPC. To see all the models stocked by B&H including some in cool colors, click here.

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What liquid is used for cooling (i.e. nitrogen)?

They use Liquid Helium in government and research Supercomputers. But in your houshold PC they use a variation of mixtures depending on how fancy you want to get. Some just use plain old distilled water, some use a dyed flourescent water, some use a mixture of antifreeze and water, the antifreeze is to prevent corrosion. 

I dont see why they cant build a larger heatsink and stronger fan on the CPU itself. Physics will prove that the systems all do the same thing but some are more efficient and easier to build than others. The water cooling thing is more marketing than practical it seems. All the water cooling system does is move the heat sink to another area of the case, in the end its still all air cooled.

 Probably argon..or plain alcohol? he he not a clue ;(

I have an i7 870 running with zalman air cooling- idle aroung 30, load aroung 70,and a nvidia gtx 470 that idles in the 40s and loads in the high 50s-low 60s (at 100 fan speed) on the stock air/heatsink cooling.

I tried a corsair closed loop cpu liquid cooling system, and my idles were actually in the high 40s, but my load was around the same.

Liquid cooling is just one of those things that equates to the photographers desire to buy the twice as expensive camera for the 2 more megapixels, as long as your not making poster, 20 mp is pretty much the same as 22 mp...so as long as your not overclocking your cpu past 4 ghz (which is uneccesarily (seriously) too fast) than a good air cooler will more than suffice.  Liquid cooling just costs too much more than air cooling for the few degrees cooler.  Its just not necessary.

Great job...if the fluid is leaking, i can **** inside :D:D:D

nothing new about this.  Geeze.  the top gaming computers use liquids and even oil to cool with.  heck, even H-P (gasp!) has a liquid cooled.  I do agree with the person saying it's like a camera nut paying double the price for 2 more megs.  You gotta be a really REALLY serious gamer to need something like this.

Secondly to the liquid cooling did anyone bother to notice the bit about the ' whooping 650 watt power supply', come on now my machine even has a 1000 watt for the safe side and that is not all that big.  If you run several disc drives internal with a really 'good video' card or two and Bluray etc you will be maxing out 650 watts quickly and buying a new power supply.