New Rokinon 24mm f/3.5 Tilt-Shift ED AS UMC Lens for a Shift in Perspective

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Rokinon has released a manual focus 24mm f/3.5 Tilt-Shift lens for Canon, Nikon and Sony Alpha full-frame DSLR cameras. Tilt-shift lenses provide the capability to control perspective and to correct the convergence of lines within the frame. They also offer depth of field control without the need for wide aperture settings and exacting selective-focus placement. While a tilt-shift lens is useful in numerous photographic applications and can be creatively incorporated into any kind of photography, it is particularly valuable for architecture, product and landscape photographers. The 24mm f/3.5 Tilt-Shift ED AS UMC Lens provides a 24mm wide-angle focal length for full-frame cameras and, when used with APS-C-sized sensors from Canon, is equivalent to a 38.4mm lens, or a 36mm lens when used with Nikon or Sony APS-C-sized sensors.

The tilt-shift function on the Rokinon 24mm f/3.5 allows for smooth tilt adjustment of the focal plane angle by +/-8.5° and enables parallel shift of the optical axis by +/-12mm. To make the tilt-shift function even more seamless, both the lens mount as well as Tilt-Shift section may be rotated along the optical axis. The tilt-shift section can be rotated left by 90° (with 30° click-stop adjustment), while the lens mount may be rotated both in left and right direction by 90°, also with 30° adjustment.

The lens itself is composed of 16 elements in 11 groups including two aspherical elements and two extra-low dispersion (ED) lenses. The aspherical and ED elements minimize chromatic aberrations for accurate colors and overall sharper imagery. The lenses also feature a UMC coating for consistent, even light transmission and limited reflections, which will reduce flare and ghosting to help produce clear, high-contrast images. The aperture range for the lens is f/3.5-22 on all three mounts, and the minimum focus distance is consistent as well, at 7.9”.

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  Canon EF Mount Nikon F Mount Sony Alpha Mount
Focal Length 24mm 24mm 24mm
APS-C Focal Length Equivalent 38.4mm 36mm 36mm
Aperture Range f/3.5-22 f/3.5-22 f/3.5-22
Angle of View (Full Frame) 84.1° 84.1° 84.1°
Angle of View (APS-C) 58.8° 62° 62°
Maximum Tilt +/-8.5° +/-8.5° +/-8.5°
Maximum Shift +/-12mm +/-12mm +/-12mm
Mount Rotation 90° Left and Right 90° Left and Right 90° Left and Right
Minimum Focus Distance 7.9" (20 cm) 7.9" (20 cm) 7.9" (20 cm)
Lens Construction (Groups/Elements) 11/16 11/16 11/16
Filter Thread 82mm 82mm 82mm
Dimensions 3.4 x 4.4" (86 x 113mm) 3.4 x 4.4" (86 x 110.5mm) 3.4 x 4.4" (86 x 112.5mm)
Weight 1.5 lb (680 g) 1.5 lb (680 g) 1.5 lb (680 g)

Discussion 13

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How does this lens stand up to the Canon 3.5L II 24mm TS-E? has there been any comparison reviews between the two? I have been looking at the Canon version but have been unable to justify the expense.

Hello,

I'm not aware of any side by side comparisons, but my experience with off brand lenses that are less expensive alternatives to more expensive models is to a degree you sacrifice some image quality and build. I had the Sigma 28mm f/1.8 lens for several years opposed to purchasing back then the Nikon f/1.4 model. Once stopped down, the lens was great but I never liked the lens wide open or close to it (which is the reason I purchased it). If you are printing images taken with this lens professionally, the Canon would be the better choice. For home printing or web usage, I have no doubt the Rokinon would perform to expectation.

Thanks!

Rick at lens rentals.com has done a quick comparison between the Samyang, canon and the Nikon. The jist of it sounds like the canon is the sharpest/best quality and the Samyang and Nikon are pretty close on sharpness, but he was suspect of the build quality of the Samyang and the Nikon doesn't have the flexibility of rotating the shift/tilt mech. as the the Samyang does. He said it looks like a decent value, just not as spectacular one as their other lenses.

This lens is tempting because I am a film shooter and it will probably operate satisfactorily on my Nikon F3 with sport finder (can you say miniature view camera) or maybe even on my old F with sport finder. I traded some equipment I had for a nearly new Nikon 24 TS but the @#$%& electronic aperture would only work with my F100 or F6, and they both interfere with the Nikon 24TS in some positions. Composing an image with a Sport Finder is far more is more satisfying than a eye-level finder also.What is the price of the Rokinon?

I have ordered the Samyang over the Rokinon because I like the more polished finish better but I saw that I had to pay shipping whereas the Rokinion included free shipping. Why the difference? Are both lenses actually manfactured by some unknown 3 party so that Samyang and Rokinon are merely distributors? Is the lens made in Korea or somewhere else (like China). Is there ANY difference in the optical performance between the two lens version? I thought I saw the Samyang with larger knobs and black and not gray plastic - true? Is there ANY other considerations that I could use to base my buying decision? I already have the Nikon 24 PC-E, but I really am having a left distortion/focus problem unless I shift the lens to -3. I'd really like to have shift and tilt in the same axis.

Rokinon is a brand name that Samyang uses in the USA. They also sell under the name of Bower,Walimex, and ProOptic.

The wording of the description is ambiguous at best. So, can the tilt be rotated seperately of the shift like the Canon 24mm ts-e Mk II?

Yes, there is rotation between tilt and shift.

I have a Nikon D800. I got it to use a substitute for my 4 x 5 view camera used with film, which I scan. I'm not sure I really need tilts or swings in the smaller format, since at useful speeds, I get so much more DOF in the smaller format, but having shifts would be very useful for architecture. But I imagine there will be cases when tilts would be useful.

Keeping in mind that because of my view camera experience, I am not deterred by the lack of automatic features, how is the Rokinon likely to compare with the Nikkor 24 mm tilt shift lens, which costs twice as much?
The Nikon D800 can easily produce images which can be printed at 16 x 20 when shot with its normal lenses, (at least if you ignore grain sniffers who put their noses right up against the print). Could I expect the Rokinon to yield images of that quality?

Hello,

Image quality is a matter of taste so it's difficult to say how a particular lens will meet your expectations in a 16x20 inch print.

My experience with off brand lenses that are less expensive alternatives to more expensive models is to a degree you sacrifice some image quality and build. I had the Sigma 28mm f/1.8 lens for several years opposed to purchasing back then the Nikon f/1.4 model. Once stopped down, the lens was great but I never liked the lens wide open or close to it (which is the reason I purchased it).

If you are printing images taken with this lens professionally, the Nikon 24mm PC-E lens would be the better choice. For home printing or web usage, I have no doubt the Rokinon would perform to expectation.

The Nikon 24mm PC-E has two problems. One is that their is no rotation between the tilt and the shift. If you want the shift to be in the same direction as the tilt you have to disassemble the lens and change it (voiding the warranty) or send it to Nikon and have them change it for around $250 (if they are still providing that service).

The second problem is that it has a fair amount of chromatic aberration when shifted or tilted. This cannot be removed in post because with a tilt or shift, it is not concentric to the center of the image.

The Rokinon has rotation between the tilt and shift, as do the Canon tilt-shift lenses.

Sample images are just starting to show up. There are a couple D800 user reports on the Nikon lens forum at dpreview. So far, it looks like the optical quality is decent at f/8 but horrible at f/3.5. This would be acceptable for most uses of this lens.

I decided, largely on the basis of this review, to order this lens. So far, at least, I am very happy with it. The instructions could have been clearer, but after fiddling with the lens for a short while, I found it very easy to use. I haven't yet done any extensive tests, but my impression is that the images are of high quality and good enough for my purposes.

The lens is new enough that not very many people, including Rokinon Support, know much about it. This B&H review seems to most complete source I've been able to find.

Of course, I can't tell now how well this lens will do with repeated use, but it seems solidly built and looks as if it should hold up.