B&H Prospectives: Headshot Photography, with Peter Hurley

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In this second episode of our new series, Prospectives, much sought-after headshot photographer Peter Hurley explains his approach to taking a headshot. From the tools he uses, to creating rapport with the client, Hurley demonstrates the different elements that will make one's photography look strong and professional.

 

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ARE YOU OUT OF YOUR MIND ?! I would NEVER hire Peter Hurley! His "headshots"
are mostly one-dimensional flat. I never saw a difficult subject, only near-
perfect models. And the catchlights in the eyes are God-awful. NONE of my clients would find his work acceptable except for maybe the poses themselves.
And the B&H video of him was equally awful; no dimension, bad white balance but the audio was clear. And a white background? If his work is so good, why
weren't samples of his work in the background instead?

Peter Hurley is all hype and full of himself. I don't understand who, other then equally self-absorbed people, would embrace his work. Arrrrrgh!

I was fully expecting a lot more how-tos instructions. This is a good example of someone who is a good, experience photographer in a niche area of the art but a less than stellar instructor. I think he would excelled if he had scripted out his presentation, outlining an intro, a step by step description on how to achieve a good head shot and a better summary.

On another note, these presentations/tutorials should be aimed at the beginner/intermediate photographer and therefore, equipment such as cameras, lens and studio setups should reflect what the "average" photo enthusiast would be using. I doubt too many professionals photographers will be viewing these videos.

Many viewers, myself included, appreciate tutorials that describe techniques, tips and methods using consumer grade cameras and equipment. That is not to say that the instructor can't drive home the point that staging, posing and lighting are generally the same regardless of the camera used. In short, some great photographers are not great teachers. I appreciate his efforts anyway.