From Shot to Print: Creating the Ideal Digital Imaging Workflow

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Have you ever made a print from a Professional Inkjet Printer and didn’t get the results you were expecting? Were the colors not matching what you were seeing on the screen? Was the print darker than what was on the screen? Not sure where to start? Look no further, for this seminar is perfect for you! 

In this intermediate to advanced seminar, you’ll learn exactly how to create the ideal digital imaging workflow to ensure you’re getting the best possible prints. Nobody likes wasting valuable ink on bad prints, and that means having a properly calibrated display before printing your best shots. There are a number of affordable devices on the market today that make display calibration a breeze. Canon's Jamie Waller gives a live demo of how easy it is to correctly adjust your display’s brightness and color. This is a crucial step in digital imaging and a possible reason why you may not be getting the results you expect. 

Once you’ve jumped that short hurdle, it’s time to print those great images. You may be under the assumption that it’s more expensive to print at home than it is to send your images to a digital lab. This isn’t true! Printing your own images has a wealth of advantages, which Waller discusses during the seminar. Some of you may already own a Professional Inkjet Printer, while some are still doing research. Waller covers everyone’s needs by discussing Canon’s PIXMA PRO Printers. The PRO-100, PRO-10, and PRO-1 are all outstanding printers and each of them has benefits and features that fit into your workflow. As an expert in this field, Waller answer some of the questions you may have about these printers. He takes you through his printing workflow and shows you how to turn images into beautiful prints that can be cherished for a lifetime. 

Waller’s passion for teaching and education makes this seminar valuable and worth watching. His personal goal is to educate and empower each viewer with the knowledge needed to see and print what their camera captured at that decisive moment. To see more of these exciting printers, click here.

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Gee, you'd think that B&H would have been able to do better on the lighting . . .