Chris Gampat

2 years ago

A funny thing happened as photographic technology became better and better: lenses got smarter, but photographers?—not necessarily.

Yes, modern lenses are ultra-sharp and super-contrasty, they focus automatically, and undesirable artifacts like chromatic aberration and barrel distortion have improved. However, autofocus technology has brought three critical changes that serious photographers need to consider carefully when they choose their lenses, because they can be a hindrance to thoughtful photography if not used carefully.

Editor's Note: This is a guest blogpost by Brian Dilg of NYFA. For more educational resources, you can check out lots of their classes.

2 years ago

If you don’t have the budget to buy or rent studio lighting gear, or you just prefer to travel light, can you still get studio-style results?

The good news is that you can. The equipment will not be as functionally convenient as gear designed specifically for the job. You’ll have to get a bit creative in terms of how you piece together and use parts that weren’t conceived for this purpose. In the end, light is light—it’s how you use it and how you modify the sources that really give lighting its “look.”

Editor's Note: This is a guest blogpost by Brian Dilg, Chair, New York Film Academy Photography School

Opening photo is Day Two Hundred Ninety-nine: Ninja Time [Explored] by Stormline via the B&H Photo Flickr Group

3 years ago

In this episode of Real Exposures, David Brommer talks to famed photojournalist and wedding photographer Ryan Brenizer. They talk about the Brenizer Method; film vs digital; never getting bored when shooting; his mentors and influencers; and what he's working on, going forward.

Plus, you'll get special insights into what some of Ryan's favorite gear is.

Sit back, relax, and enjoy the episode.

3 years ago

Are your photos featured this week? Read more to see this week's selection from our B&H Photo Flickr Group. If you haven't joined already, what are you waiting for?

3 years ago

Previously, we spoke about shooting in large cities. During vacations, we tend to wander and explore at night. As soon as the sun goes down, the rules of photography suddenly change: You need faster apertures, you're shooting at slower shutter speeds, and the ISOs go to near BBQ levels. If you're an amateur photographer taking your DSLR along to shoot for fun on your vacation, take a look at these tips on how to photograph the cities.

3 years ago

Now that you've got those great new photography accessories from the holidays, what's next? It's time to learn how to use them to their fullest potential. There are some great specialists that can help you learn how to do just that. Here's a list of a few schools that offer classes to help you become a better photographer.

3 years ago

Are your photos featured this week? Read more to see this week's selection from our B&H Photo Flickr Group. If you haven't joined already, what are you waiting for?


3 years ago

Before you get to shoot concerts with amazing lighting like Todd Owyoung does, you'll probably be getting lots of practice in small bars and other such venues with dismal lighting.

3 years ago

A couple of years ago, former B&H Marketing Rep Alan Winslow and his girlfriend Morrigan set out on a project to bike around the entire United States of America and document what people were doing to go green. Now, the couple is working on a new project: The Geography of Youth. This time, they're tackling the world and focusing on the youth. I got to talk to them recently about the project, the gear, and the influences.

Intro Photo by David Wright

3 years ago

Photography is tough work! With the advent of DSLRs and studio software, it’s easier than ever for a novice to take quality pictures without any formal training. People without the requisite creativity, training, and business acumen are calling themselves professional photographers. We asked some famous photographers what advice they would give these people, and what the most trying aspect of the photography business is for them.

Photo by fsumaria

3 years ago

All Photographs ©Shannon Richardson

Shannon Richardson is an editorial/commercial photographer based in Amarillo, Texas. His recently-published book "Route 66 American Icon" is a culmination of a six-year project documenting the iconic roadway. Shannon was generous enough to answer some questions about the project and about his work.

3 years ago

Like many of you, I don't always like to shoot with my DSLR, because of how bulky and heavy it can be. Sometimes, I just want a good point-and-shoot. But to get a really good photo, lighting is so important. I'm a big lover of strobist techniques, so using them with a point-and-shoot was always something that I wanted to test out a bit.

3 years ago

Have you ever thought of embracing flaws instead of fighting them? We recently wrote about trying to correct discolored concert photos. While testing the Olympus EPL-2 at a Chiptunes Concert, I learned a valuable lesson: that to create better work, sometimes you need to break away from tradition and not take your work so seriously.

3 years ago

We all know that photography isn't easy. Now that you've been fondling some brand new photo gear from the holidays, you'll need to become a better photographer by creating a New Year's Resolution, and sticking to it! What projects will you do to improve yourself? For those of you that are completely lost, here is a short list of some popular ideas that you can adopt as your own New Year's Resolution.

3 years ago

Good street photography is able to capture fleeting moments in the streets and summarize the entire experience in one photo. Part of it is also accepting that not every photo you shoot will be breathtaking. But before you even think about any of this, you'll need to get rid of your fear of shooting, which many people have. Here are a couple of tips on how to do this.

Editor's Note: Many of the photos in this story are selections from the B&H Flickr Group. Hover over the photos to see who shot them.

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