Don Peters

3 years ago

Most of us who are amateurs have limited budgets for photography.  When it comes to buying software, we need to be prudent and frugal.  I've made both good choices and bad ones. 

3 years ago

His early work as a photojournalist brought Jack Dykinga a Pulitzer Prize. That was just the beginning. He subsequently became one of the finest and most celebrated landscape photographers of our time.

In this interview, Jack discusses how he takes photographs, digital processing, the challenges of making a living at photography, conservation, and much more.

3 years ago

When we think of landscape photography, many of us tend to think of our wide-angle lenses. There are situations, though, in which a telephoto lens is a better choice—or the only choice.




3 years ago

What separates the best landscape photographers from the rest of us? And I definitely consider myself one of “the rest of us.”

A major part of the answer, I think, is that the best photographers simply work harder. They’re willing put in the time it takes to get a memorable photograph.

3 years ago

We can find many subjects for abstract and still-life photography around the house. To capture them, we only need basic photographic gear, and imagination.

A still life is usually defined as an arrangement of inanimate objects. Our homes are full of them. We may find an existing arrangement of objects that we like, such as this vase of flowers.

Editor's Note: This is a guest blogpost from Don Peters

3 years ago

When I was first learning photography, I was often disappointed by my images. I’d go to a beautiful place, and take many photographs. Later, when I’d examine the results on the monitor, I’d find that what had been so appealing in person wasn’t captured by the camera. Sound familiar?

4 years ago

Ansel Adams once remarked that a good photograph is knowing where to stand. Where we stand—or kneel, sit, or lie—determines the camera’s point of view.

The seemingly mundane task of selecting a point of view is one of the most creative aspects of photography. When the camera’s position changes, the relationships of the visual elements in the viewfinder are rearranged. We can redesign the world as the camera sees it, simply by moving.

4 years ago

Some photographs continue to hold our interest long after they are taken. Others don't. What accounts for the difference? It's worth looking at our own work with that question in mind. The answer may tell us what kinds of photographs we should be taking.

4 years ago

It's easy to take forgettable landscape photographs.  I've done it many times.  We see a pretty scene, twist some dials, focus and start clicking the shutter.  Then we get home and wonder why the results are so disappointing.

There's a better way.

4 years ago

Few things improved my photography more than learning when and how to set the exposure manually. That knowledge allows us to get good exposures in situations that automatic exposure can't handle. Setting the exposure manually also encourages us to make conscious, creative decisions about exposure.

I've heard some photographers say that they don't see any reason to use manual exposure. If that's your view, here's why I think you should reconsider.

4 years ago

Photographs of lightning aren't particularly difficult to take. It's mostly a matter of being prepared to get a good image when lightning appears.

My friend Christina Lawrie is much better at photographing lightning than I am. Here's how she does it.

4 years ago

We need to be on the lookout for photographs that aren't yet available, but soon may be. 

We get a good composition when the right combination of subject matter and light coalesces in the viewfinder. Subjects are often moving. Light is often changing. We need to be thinking ahead to avoid missing shots.


4 years ago

Good landscape photographs usually have an interesting subject, a good composition and good light. Of those three ingredients, the right light may be the most elusive.

How do we find it? It requires thinking, persistence, and a willingness to get up early and stay out late.




4 years ago

We don't need to travel to scenic places to find good subjects for photographs. I've taken many photographs that I like, within a few miles or even a few blocks of my home.

How do we find such images? It's mostly a matter of learning to look carefully at the details in what we see around us. When we've found a detail that will work as a subject, we then need to be creative in finding the right composition.



4 years ago

I was traveling six hundred feet down and a thousand years back, more or less. The trail from the rim of Canyon de Chelly to the White House Ruin begins with a series of steep switchbacks. On one side, there's a wall of rock. On the other side, if you're clumsy, there's a fall that's long enough to kill you. I watched my step.





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