Digital Bolex D16 RAW Video Cameras

Share

Do you need a camera with a retro design that harks back to the early days of independent cinema, when small and simple-to-use film cameras redefined the established rules of filmmaking? The Digital Bolex may be for you. Incorporating a modern Super16-sized CCD sensor, the Digital Bolex is a full-featured yet simple-to-use digital cinema camera, designed to de-mystify the craft of digital filmmaking. Although inspired by the Bolex film camera, the Digital Bolex incorporates two 3-pin XLR audio inputs with phantom power for recording audio.

Utilizing a C-Mount, the camera allows you to choose from a wide variety of classic and modern C-mount lenses to help craft your image. The Digital Bolex is available in either a Color or Monochrome version, with the monochrome version removing the color filter and providing 13 stops of dynamic range, versus the color version’s 12 stops. The monochrome version allows you to produce true black-and-white cinematography, using optional color filters to control contrast and affect your image, instead of creating a faux black-and-white image by de-saturating in post. Please note that the camera is available as either a monochrome or a color camera, and cannot be converted.

The camera records 12-bit Adobe cinema DNG files, providing you more control and post-production adjustment of your footage than with standard video files. Recording is to an internal 512GB or 1TB drive, and the camera incorporates two CF card slots for recording to media cards. An internal battery powers the camera for 3 to 4 hours at a time, and you can also power the camera from an external 12-volt battery via a 4-pin XLR connector. Using built-in, non-replaceable SSD and battery reduces the weight required for removable/user replaceable SSDs and batteries, while improving the overall robustness of the camera. A built-in view screen aids in menu navigation and allows you to view your footage while shooting.

Items discussed in article

Discussion 1

Add new comment

Add comment Cancel

With exception, of course, I'll go B & W as a general rule; in stills as well as motion pictures.