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Canon Rebel XTi FAQ
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What is 'magnification factor' and why are lenses described in terms of 35mm equivalent? Arenít DSLRs 35mm cameras?
While most DSLRs are based on 35mm cameras systems, the imaging sensors found in many DSLRs are physically smaller than a frame of 35mm film (24x36mm). As an example, the CMOS imaging sensor found in Canonís EOS Digital Rebel, EOS Digital Rebel XT, EOS 20D and EOS 30D are only 40% the size of a 35mm film frame. The CMOS imaging sensor found in Canonís EOS 1D Mark II is about 70% the size of a 35mm frame, while the Canon EOS 5D and 1Ds Mark II contain 'full-frame' CMOS sensors.

As a result, the field of view of the same lens changes depending on the sensor it is used with and we have to figure in whatís called a magnification (or crop) factor when deciding which lens is best for the job. If you like the look of wide-angle lenses, you now have to use lenses wider than you would need when shooting with a full-frame 35mmcamera. Conversely, long lenses are now effectively longer. Just as a 20mm lens effectively becomes a 26 to 32mm lens (depending on which camera you are using), a 200mm lens effectively becomes a 260 to 320mm lens, again depending on whether you are dealing with a 1.6x or 1.3 x magnification factors.

Canonís EOS 1Ds Mark II, which contains a 16.7 Mp full-frame CMOS sensor and the Canon EOS 5D with its 12 Mp full-frame CMOS sensor, render the field of view of all Canon EF lenses normally without concern of magnification factors.

Which lenses work with the Canon Rebel XTi?
Virtually all Canon EF and EF-S lenses work seamlessly with the Canon EOS Rebel XTi, as well as previous Canon Digital Rebel cameras. Canon EF lenses are designed for use with all Canon 35mm film cameras and DSLRs. On the other hand, Canon EF-S lenses are made specifically for use with Canon DSLRs that use the smaller APS-C- sized CMOS sensors used in the Canon 20D, 30D, and all Digital Rebel models.

Note- Canon EF-S lenses can only be used with Canon DSLRs containing APS-C sized imaging sensors, and cannot be used on Canon EOS 1D-series DSLRs, which contain larger imaging sensors.

Which Canon Speedlites can I use with my Canon XTi?
The Canon EOS Rebel XTi features E-TTL II flash metering technology, and is most compatible with all current Canon EX-series Speedlites. From a weight/balance point-of-view the Canon Speedlite 430EX is probably the best match for your Rebel. If you need additional flash output, or would like the option of using external battery power you might want to check out the Canon 580EX Speedlite as well. These Speedlites work equally well with all other Canon EOS DSLRs.

Earlier Canon Speedlites will also work, but depending on the specific model, may not take full advantage of the accuracy of the Canon E-TTL II flash technology found in the Rebel XTi.

How fast can I shoot with my Canon EOS Rebel XTi?
The Canon Rebel XTi will fire up to 3 frames-per-second with a burst-rate of up to 27 images flat-out. Shutter speeds can be set for a range of 30-seconds to as fast 1/4000th. Top flash sync-speed (with Canon EX-series Speedlites) is 1/200th.

What kind of memory cards does the Canon EOS Rebel XTi use?
All Canon Digital Rebels use CompactFlash (CF) Card Type I & II memory cards, which are currently available in capacities of up to 8-gigs.

What type of file formats does the Rebel XTi produce?
The Canon EOS Rebel XTi can be programmed to record images in a choice of 5 levels of JPEG compression, Canon RAW, or a combination of RAW and JPEG. JPEG files range in size of 3.8Mb to 0.7Mb. RAW files are approximately 9.8Mb. You can also record RAW and JPEG files simultaneously.

What choice of color spaces do I have for recording my image files?
As with all current Canon EOS DSLRs you can select between sRGB and Adobe RGB as a color space.

What are 'Picture Styles'?
Picture Styles is a feature found on the EOS Rebel XTi that allows you to select from six preset color, saturation, sharpness, and contrast settings designed to match the look and mood of your pictures. They include Standard (Default setting- vivid, sharp), Portrait Soft, lower contrast), Landscape (sharp, high blue/green saturation), Neutral, Faithful (accurate color rendition based on colorimetric data), and Monochrome, for black & White imaging. You also have the option to create up to three additional custom settings of your choice.

How does the Rebel's Self Cleaning Sensor Unit work?
Occasionally dust settles on the low-pass filter that sits in front of the Rebel's CMOS sensor. To help eliminate the problem the Rebel XTi utilizes ultrasonic vibrations to 'shake' dust particles off the filter surface. These ultrasonic vibrations are set off every time the camera is turned on or off.

To help prevent these same dust particles from resettling on the filter surface, strips of tacky material are strategically placed along the sides of the mirror chamber to trap lose particles and prevent them from causing further problems.

In addition to 'ultrasonic shakedowns', the Digital Photo Professional (DPP) v 2.2 software (included with the Canon Rebel XTi) is able to plot the location of any stubborn dust particles that remain on the sensor, embed this information to the RAW or JPEG file, and electronically eliminate it in the final photos.

How can I prevent dust from getting into my camera?
Even if you never remove the lens from the camera body, dust inevitably gets into the best-sealed cameras. That said, there are several measures you can take to reduce the possibility of dust settling on your camera's CMOS sensor.

First off, never leave your camera without a lens or body cap. If it's uncovered, dust is getting into the mirror chamber. Lenses should be capped at all times as well. If dust settles on the rear element of your lens, it's ultimately going to get into your camera body.

You should also get into the habit of aiming your camera downward when you do change lenses as dust falls down - not up. If you are outside, turn your back to the wind (and aim the camera down) when you swap lenses.

Lastly, turn your camera off before removing the lens in order to reduce the effects of electro-magnetic energy, which is unavoidably created by electrical currents running through a polymer (plastic) camera body.

What is the DIGIC II processor?
DIGIC II is the name of the image processor found in the Canon EOS Rebel XTi. Image processors control the overall performance of the camera (AF speed, image processing speed, buffer capacity, etc) as well as the color and tonal qualities of the final image. Other factors controlled by the camera's image processor are battery life, dynamic range (highlight and shadow detail and gradations), and noise management.

What is the 'Display Off Sensor'?
The Display Off Sensor is located near the Rebel XTi's viewfinder. When you raise the camera to your eye, it senses the movement and turns the camera's LCD screen off in order to eliminate any stray glare that might distract you when looking through the finder. When you lower the camera it turns the LCD back on again for viewing images.

Can I download pictures from my camera directly to my computer?
You can easily download all or a selection of images from your Rebel XTi directly to your computer using the camera's Print/Share button. The camera connects to the computer via a USB 2.0 cable, which is included with your camera.

How large can I print from the image files I get from the Rebel XTi?
The Canon EOS Rebel XTi contains a 10.1Mp CMOS sensor, which produces images files of about 30Mb. You should have no trouble printing sharp, robust images of up to 16x20" and larger.

My last digital camera suffered from shutter lag, and the delays caused me to miss many photographs. Does the Canon Rebel XTi suffer from similar delays?
The Canon EOS Rebel XTi has a start-up time of about 0.2 seconds, and you should seldom experience missed photos due to shutter lag.

Does my Canon Rebel XTi have Image Stabilization built into it?
While the Canon Rebel XTi does not contain Image Stabilization (IS), Canon offers a variety of IS-enabled lenses that make shooting sharp images under low-light conditions that much easier. Canon's IS-enabled lenses allow you to shoot images at 3 - 4 shutter speeds slower than non-IS-enabled lenses.

The accepted rule is to never shoot hand-held at shutter speeds slower than the focal-length of the lens being used. Accordingly, a 200mm lens should not be hand-held at speeds slower than 1/200th, and a 20mm lens should not be hand-held at speeds slower than 1/20th. If however your lens is IS-enabled, you can now hand-hold a 200mm lens as slow as 1/25th and a 20m lens as slow as 1/2-second and still maintain image sharpness.

Which software applications can I use to view and edit the image files I shoot with my Rebel XTi?
The Canon Rebel XTi comes with several programs designed specifically for images captured with Canon digital cameras. For editing and viewing you can use either the ZoomBrowser EX v5.7 (Windows) or ImageBrowser v5.7 (Mac). Both programs can be used to view and edit JPEGs and RAW files, as well as TIFF and BMP files, and can be used for organizing, categorizing, naming (or batch naming) of image files. You can also use Photoshop CS2 to open, process and edit image files shot with the Rebel XTi.

Are there any lighting conditions I cannot shoot under using the Rebel XTi?
There are few (if any) lighting conditions that can stump the Canon Reel XTi's image processor. Presets include Auto, Daylight, Shade, Cloudy, Tungsten, White Fluorescent, Flash, Manual, as well as custom settings you can establish on your own. If you shoot RAW files you also have the ability to adjust the color balance long after the image is captured by re-opening your files in either Canon's Digital Photo Professional (DPP) or Photoshop.

How many pictures can I shoot on a single battery charge?
According to Canon a fully-charged NB-2LH battery will deliver up to 500 exposures (without flash) at 73-degrees Fahrenheit, or up to 370 exposures (without flash) at 32-degrees Fahrenheit.

Converting Canon RAW images with Digital Photo Professional (Macintosh)
RAW is the name given to an image file type that records image data captured by the camera's image sensor without any processing. When using JPEG images, conventionally used with digital cameras, if you repeatedly edit and save the images, the image data or image quality will deteriorate. In contrast, when using RAW images, you can avoid any deterioration in image data or image quality if you use software for RAW images after importing RAW images to the computer.

How to convert and save RAW images
Most image-editing software cannot display RAW images, so some processing is required to open them. "Processing" means converting the RAW images to an appropriate file type such as JPEG so that the file can be manipulated on the computer.

Once a RAW image has been processed, a new file will be created and be converted in accordance with the settings (such as the processing parameters) specified in the camera at the time of shooting, in addition to the original RAW image. Also, the image can be edited using image-editing software in addition to the parameter settings described above.

Digital Photo Professional supports processing RAW images shot by the following models:

EOS Kiss Digital N/ EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT/ EOS 350D Digital, EOS-1Ds Mark II, EOS-1D, EOS-1Ds, EOS-1D Mark II, EOS 20D, EOS 10D, EOS Kiss Digital / EOS DIGITAL REBEL / EOS 300D Digital

Also, this application is exclusively for Mac OS X (10.2 to 10.3). Use ImageBrowser for Mac OS X (10.1.5).

Follow the procedures below to convert and save RAW images.

1. Start Digital Photo Professional.
2. Select a RAW image to convert and adjust the image settings as necessary.
3. From the [File] menu, select [Convert and save].
4. When the [Convert and save] dialog box appears, specify the file name, file destination, and file type, and then click the [Save] button. The selected RAW image will be converted and saved in the specified file type.


Important: If you set the camera to record RAW and JPEG images simultaneously, be careful not to overwrite your original JPEG images if you later convert your RAW images to JPEG files.

Perform one of the procedures below to avoid overwriting the original JPEG images: - Specify a different folder for the converted JPEG images
- Rename the converted JPEG images
- Save the converted images in TIFF

Converting Canon RAW images with Digital Photo Professional (Windows) RAW is the name given to an image file type that records image data captured by the camera's image sensor without any processing. When using JPEG images, conventionally used with digital cameras, if you repeatedly edit and save the images, the image data or image quality will deteriorate. In contrast, when using RAW images, you can avoid any deterioration in image data or image quality if you use software for RAW images after importing RAW images to the computer.

How to convert and save RAW images
Most image-editing software cannot display RAW images, so some processing is required to open them. "Processing" means converting the RAW images to an appropriate file type such as JPEG so that the file can be manipulated on the computer.

Once a RAW image has been processed, a new file will be created and be converted in accordance with the settings (such as the processing parameters) specified in the camera at the time of shooting, in addition to the original RAW image. Also, the image can be edited using image-editing software in addition to the parameter settings described above.

Digital Photo Professional supports processing RAW images shot by the following models:

EOS Kiss Digital N/ EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT/ EOS 350D Digital, EOS-1Ds Mark II, EOS-1D, EOS-1Ds, EOS-1D Mark II, EOS 20D, EOS 10D, EOS Kiss Digital / EOS DIGITAL REBEL / EOS 300D Digital

Also, this application is exclusively for Windows 2000 and Windows XP. Use ZoomBrowser EX for Windows Me and Windows 98 SE.

Follow the procedures below to convert and save RAW images.

1. Start Digital Photo Professional.
2. Select a RAW image to convert and adjust the image settings as necessary.
3. From the [File] menu, select [Convert and save].
4. When the [Save as] dialog box appears, specify the file name, file destination, and file type, and then click the [Save] button.
The selected RAW image will be converted and saved in the specified file type.

Important- If you set the camera to record RAW and JPEG images simultaneously, be careful not to overwrite your original JPEG images if you later convert your RAW images to JPEG files.

Perform one of the procedures below to avoid overwriting the original JPEG images:
- Specify a different folder for the converted JPEG images
- Rename the converted JPEG images
- Save the converted images in TIFF