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Photographers' Formulary TF-4 Archival Rapid Fixer for Black & White Film & Paper - Makes 1 Gallon

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Photographers' Formulary
Photographers' Formulary TF-4 Archival Rapid Fixer for Black & White Film & Paper - Makes 1 Gallon
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$13.95
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How long does this last after you open it or mix ...

How long does this last after you open it or mix it. I read that its 1 week. while others last 3 months?
Asked by: Reuben
I mix one gallon and it keeps for months on end. Since I don’t print every month I just store the used portion in a separate container and test it with Hypo Check before re using it. H
Answered by: Anonymous
Date published: 2019-08-26

Hello, my fixer has arrived but is a milky white ...

Hello, my fixer has arrived but is a milky white liquid. Normally fixer is clear - is this fixer white and opaque?
Asked by: Michael
Yes the Photographers' Formulary TF-4 Archival Rapid Fixer in concentrate is milky. Make sure when you mix it you stir very well before and after you add water to it. It will mix and be less milky.
Answered by: Robert
Date published: 2023-07-16

I purchased this product about 4 years ago and ...

I purchased this product about 4 years ago and never opened it. Would it still be good to mix and use today?
Asked by: Edward
If one purchased the Photographers' Formulary TF-4 Archival Rapid Fixer for Black & White Film & Paper ,and never opened it up, and stored it in normal temperatures,(not too warm), it should still work fine. Just to make sure it would be good to do a test in the darkroom, by fixing a paper sample for the normal fixing time, and then turn the lights on to see if it will fog.
Answered by: Lenny
Date published: 2019-07-24

Is this liquid supposed to look like milk?? I ...

Is this liquid supposed to look like milk?? I have received a bottle today and it is a milky white opaque liquid.
Asked by: Michael
Yes, Photographers' Formulary TF-4 Archival Rapid Fixer is milky. Make sure before you add water and after that you mix it very well. After that it will clear.
Answered by: Robert
Date published: 2023-07-16

question

How to I dispose of the working solution?
Asked by: Anonymous
Although it is best to take photo chemicals to a facility where they can be properly disposed of, most normal chemicals used in processing are no worse than household cleaners that are normally put down our drains. (Bleach, 409, etc.) So use reason and common sense: if you process 200 rolls at a time, dispose of the chemicals properly. If you are doing 3-4 rolls every week or so, you shouldn't worry and pouring them down the sink is fine.
Answered by: Ruel T.
Date published: 2022-05-03

question

I today received 1L of this fixer from B & Xbut instead of experiencing joy, I am greatly distressed.At the bottom of the bottle there is a lot of sediment, which is impossible to dissolve.Is this a non-suitable solution?Can I use this solution for my film?
Asked by: Viktor M.
I agree with Bob S, since you have to dilute it in water using as measurement, I poured the concentrated solution in a gallon container then, filled only half way the original bottle gave it a good shake then, filled the whole water and shake again then poured it into the gallon jug and repeated it until all dissolved and I got all the solution in the jug. I just used tap water.
Answered by: Alberto A.
Date published: 2018-08-26

question

After manifestation in PMK and fixation and washing for 25 minutes, the Tri-x 400 film turned out to be slightly brown. This is normal?
Asked by: Viktor M.
Yes. Pyro developers, like PMK, produce a colored stain on the image. This can be brown or yellowish depending on the film. That stain is why people use Pyro developers; it gives smoother tonal transitions, especially in highlight tones.
Answered by: Christopher C.
Date published: 2018-08-26

question

Not so much a question as a bit of information, I saw in reviews that some one had said to mix this 1 part chem to 3 parts water this is not correct. It seems be misleading and 1:3 actually represents the fraction 1/3 a whole of 3 parts with 1 part chem and 2 parts water. Just wanted to clarify this to all.
Asked by: Jeremy
This is where photography deviates from actual laboratory work. Photography = 1:3 means 1 part solution + 3 parts water (4 parts total), this is what you should use for the fixer. Whereas in a lab, and I have 20+ years in biotech...Lab = 1:3 means 1 part solution (in 3 total parts) + 2 parts water (total volume - solution or 3-1=2)
Answered by: Joshua
Date published: 2021-11-21
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