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Ilford Delta 3200 Professional Black and White Negative Film (35mm Roll Film, 36 Exposures)

BH #ILD320036 • MFR #1887710
Ilford
Ilford Delta 3200 Professional Black and White Negative Film (35mm Roll Film, 36 Exposures)
Key Features
  • Panchromatic B&W Negative Film
  • ISO 3200/36° in Standard Process
  • High Speed, Very Wide Exposure Latitude
  • Ideal for Difficult Lighting Conditions
Ilford's Delta 3200 Professional is a high-speed black and white negative film for producing prints using a traditional black and white process. The film exhibits a nominal sensitivity of ISO 3200/36°, making it ideal for use in difficult lighting conditions, indoor scenes, and for fast-moving subjects. Standard development in black and white chemistry yields an unobtrusive grain texture with rich tonality and the film also responds exceptionally well to under/over exposure and push/pull development.
In Stock
$16.95
Film Format
35mm, 36 Exp.
120
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question

How many exposures come on this roll of film?
Asked by: Anonymous
This roll would contain 36 exposures on average, but depending on the 35mm camera, some may give 37-38 exposures.
Answered by: Kirk R.
Date published: 2018-08-27

question

Will it fog during shipping and x-ray it is subjected to?
Asked by: Ranbir M.
This film will not fog during any of the shipping process.
Answered by: Heather S.
Date published: 2018-12-15

question

What iso would you shoot this at if it were really dark? Like just a full moon or some street lighting? 1600 iso and have the lab push it or a higher iso?
Asked by: Anonymous
Ilford recommends expsoing Delta 3200 in the range of ISO 1600 up to 6400. The recommended meter setting is ISO 3200, however you can get high quality images at meter settings anywhere from ISO 400 up to 6400.
Answered by: Heather S.
Date published: 2022-11-28

What speed do I set my camera for this role

What speed do I set my camera for this role
Asked by: Dale
3200 is recommended. If you are shooting in low light I'd recommend 1600 or 2500.
Answered by: Ray
Date published: 2022-03-10

question

Ok. I'm to sound stupid. I'm starting using film so.I was wondering, does it have a real expiry date? And when you buy it, how long before they expire can they still be sold without an issue? My real question is, Is the expiry date something to take in account when buying film (like for meat for example unless you put it in your freezer) or is it not really an issue (let's say like processed food, chips or cans)? And if it is a problem, how can you preserve your film passed their expiry dates? Thank you a thousand times!
Asked by: Lola E.
B&H buys and sells film in bulk. In general we regularly maintain fresh film stock. All of our film is at least 6 months from expiration (typically much longer). Anytime film stock is less than 6 months from expiration we sell it in a separate section and label it as short-dated film and also price it with a slight discount (again due to the volumes we sell this rarely occurs). Unfortunately we do not have access to our inventory to hand inspect the expiration date of any of our films prior to purchase.While you may store film in a cool, dry place to assist in preserving the film's life, such as storing film in a refrigerator, this will not stop the film from expiring.
Answered by: Manzell L.
Date published: 2018-08-27

question

Do you know of any equipment or companies that will perforate this stock?
Asked by: Stephen H.
Unfortunately,B&H does not sell a 35mm film perforator, and I am not aware of any company that provides this service (nor did I see any listed via a Google search).
Answered by: Manzell L.
Date published: 2018-08-25

question

re: Delta 3200 100' roll film. Why unperforated? Will it work correctly in pre-electronic 35mm SLRs and in electronic ones such as Canon EOS models?
Asked by: p w.
As far as I know, any 35mm film without perforations will be difficult to use in most 35mm cameras. Typically these cameras have a sprocket wheel that helps move the film through the camera and advances the counter. Putting non-perforated film into one of these will most likely just poke holes and tear or damage the film. There are exceptions to this, such as cameras with no sprocket gears like the ONDU pinhole cameras, Lomography Spinner 360 or any 120/620 camera (using spacers and adapters to keep the film in place).Some people use the non-perforated 35mm films in their 126 format cameras, punching holes manually as well. And it's possible that there are some companies out there who will perforate a roll for you for a fee.
Answered by: Robn K.
Date published: 2018-08-25

question

Is this film DX coded?
Asked by: Anonymous
I believe it is, though I typically use it in a manual camera that cannot auto detect the ISO
Answered by: HANNA D. S.
Date published: 2018-08-27
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