Video Chat with a B&H Expert & Get Photography Advice Live!

ars-imago LAB-BOX Developing Tank with 35mm Module Kit (Orange)

BH #ARLB135KIT • MFR #LABBOX1MODORANGE
ars-imago
ars-imago LAB-BOX Developing Tank with 35mm Module Kit (Orange)
Key Features
  • Multi-Format Film Developing System
  • Daylight Loading and Processing
  • Includes 1 x 35mm Module
  • Continuous or Intermittent Agitation
An intuitive system for developing different formats of roll film, the orange LAB-BOX from ars-imago is a unique tank that permits both loading and processing of film in complete daylight. Featuring a distinct interchangeable module design, it is possible to quickly switch film formats just by changing the loading module; this LAB-BOX includes a single 35mm module but is compatible with the optional 120 module. Film can be loaded into the tank in daylight via these modules using an intuitive winding motion that safely pulls the film onto the reel for development, and then this winding motion also permits using either intermittent or continuous agitation methods. When agitating continuously, 10.1 oz of chemistry is required; when agitating intermittently, 16.6 oz of chemistry is required for even development. The tank itself is constructed from plastic and is designed to be as compact and lightweight as possible, measuring 7.2 x 3.9 x 4.9" and weighing 1.6 lb, and the lid's design specifically promotes fast filling and emptying of chemistry for consistent and even results.
In Stock
$159.00
Save the Tax with the credit card. 

True Know-How

Ask Our Experts

800.606.6969

ars-imago LABBOX1MODORANGE Overview

An intuitive system for developing different formats of roll film, the orange LAB-BOX from ars-imago is a unique tank that permits both loading and processing of film in complete daylight. Featuring a distinct interchangeable module design, it is possible to quickly switch film formats just by changing the loading module; this LAB-BOX includes a single 35mm module but is compatible with the optional 120 module. Film can be loaded into the tank in daylight via these modules using an intuitive winding motion that safely pulls the film onto the reel for development, and then this winding motion also permits using either intermittent or continuous agitation methods. When agitating continuously, 10.1 oz of chemistry is required; when agitating intermittently, 16.6 oz of chemistry is required for even development. The tank itself is constructed from plastic and is designed to be as compact and lightweight as possible, measuring 7.2 x 3.9 x 4.9" and weighing 1.6 lb, and the lid's design specifically promotes fast filling and emptying of chemistry for consistent and even results.

UPC: 705632598979

ars-imago LABBOX1MODORANGE Specs

Format1 x 35mm Film Roll
Solution Capacity16.6 fl oz / 490.0 mL
MaterialPlastic, Stainless Steel
Dimensions7.17 x 3.86 x 4.88" / 182 x 98 x 124 mm
Weight1.65 lb / 750 g
Packaging Info
Package Weight1.81 lb
Box Dimensions (LxWxH)8.1 x 6.1 x 5.5"

ars-imago LABBOX1MODORANGE Reviews

Useful product!

By Yong
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2022-06-08

Easy to use, and compact:)

Not worth the pricetag!

By Adam
Rated 1 out of 5
Date: 2021-12-15

Cheaply made. Way overpriced. Would not purchase again.

Great new product

By David
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2021-09-15

I recently got back into film photography but having had a stroke some years ago and losing the feeling in my left hand made it very difficult getting the film on my Paterson film reel. After seeing the Lab-Box I thought that it might be the answer to my problem and I'm very happy to say that it has been! If you have any concerns about using a darkroom or film changing bag I can highly recommend the Lab-Box.

Amzing

By Seth
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2021-02-01

This is a good investment if you shoot film as a hobby. it makes it a super easy quick process to develop your film at home without struggling in the dark.

You will find need the Lab-Box

By Maurice
Rated 5 out of 5
Date: 2022-05-08

If you're into film photography then you won't know you needed the Lab-Box till you own one. Easy and convenient to use for quick film development.

Inconsistency where you least desire it: in a dark place.

By Thomas
Rated 2 out of 5
Date: 2022-02-07

Rather than invest in a changing bag, I thought that I'd try this new product--which is not new as the idea had been around, but is newly available. I watched and followed the online tutorials for assembling the 135 unit and developing 135mm films using a mono bath developer. Everything has been assembled and inspected pursuant to the tutorials and the online videos. Preflight: I check these reels for correct orientation a dozen times: R is on right and L is on left. I check that the little notches on each reel are aligned before starting the developing session. The film leader is cut, run under the horizontal bar and the clip is attached to the leading edge of the film near dead-center. I ensure that the film is correctly seated in the film guide and that the film is advancing slowly towards the reel before putting the lid on the unit. Two films attempted in two days. ... when you hear that terrible grinding noise you know you're done unless you have a changing bag and a dependable steel kit nearby. The first roll with 135x35 T-Max exposed at box speed, processed in a mono bath. Results: Horrible streaking along the edges suggesting poor spooling, film-surface interference. Result: horrible anti-halation orange stain that doesn't go away, and underdevelopment (about -1.5 stops)--consistent with film surface interference and edges of the film nibbled. It's good that I didn't need any of the images on that roll. The next attempt was a roll of Tri-X, thinking that T-Grain might not be the best film for this developer. The Tri-X came out a little better than the T-Max, but still two frames, one in the first six frames, the other in the last six frames, damaged by surface contact with neighboring film surfaces. Perhaps the film guide isn't orienting the film squarely to the spool/axle. I will try one more experiment, with a cheap roll of some panchromatic film where I ensure that the leading edge of the film is correctly clipped and aligned in the film guide and that the film guide is in it lowest position (i.e., nearest the axle as opposed to above the axle) before attempting to wind the film onto the spool. Of course, it's also possible that the reels are defective either in design or in manufacture and that no amount of care that I expend will result in dependable, consistent results. And, finally, assuming that I perchance have success with the next roll of film that I attempt to process, I have no idea what that portends... . And here's the biggest problem: I have no way of contacting anyone at are-imago. Their website is minimal. I imagine that I'll have to purchase a changing bag and deal with smelly, sweaty hands--good fun in the dark, no?

See any errors on this page? Let us know

YOUR RECENTLY VIEWED ITEMS