Meade 8" Equatorial Wedge

Meade 8.0" Equatorial Wedge for 8" LX 200 Series Telescopes

Meade 8.0" Equatorial Wedge for 8" LX 200 Series Telescopes

B&H # MEW MFR # 07002
Meade 8" Equatorial Wedge

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  • 1Description

The equatorial wedge is required for long-exposure astrophotography and permits precise polar alignment of the telescope in the equatorial mode. For short exposure images (less than about 5-minutes) the wedge is not required.

UPC: 709942000108
Table of Contents
  • 1Description
Packaging Infozdtdyqvd
Package Weight 10.15 lb
Box Dimensions (LxWxH) 12.5 x 12.4 x 8.4"
8" Equatorial Wedge is rated 3.8 out of 5 by 6.
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Does What It's Supposed to Do This wedge fits the standard Meade field tripod. It is easy to put together and install. All the parts you need come with the wedge. It allows you to follow objects in the sky while in equatorial mode (be sure you change the setting on the Autostar II handbox to equatorial mode). The wedge includes fine adjustments for latitude and for azimuth. My wedge came with written directions that didn't match the parts supplied. However, a quick check of the Meade website produced the updated assembly manual. Overall, I am pleased with this purchase and the prompt service of B&H.
Date published: 2013-04-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Equatorial Wedges and Astrophotography Always consider using Equatorial Wedge when taking long exposures over 5 minutes in Astrophotograhy. No wedge is required for exposure images less than about 5 minutes. This is due because the stars rotate around the celestial pole, so if you track them with an alt-azimuth mount the stars will rotate during your exposures, causing them to become streaks. It is highly recommended mounting your scope on an equatorial wedge to do any type of astrophotography. Using a wedge allows the telescope fork arms to be oriented facing the celestial pole. Wedges come equipped with adjustments for both latitude angle or elevation, and the azimuth or east-west orientation. Once the wedge and tripod are properly aligned, the telescope need only turn on one axis to track any object in the sky. Wedges are a must have accessory for serious astrophotography using fork mounted telescope systems.
Date published: 2012-12-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great for Astrophotography Well after buying a 8 LX200-ACF here in Australia I then needed a wedge for some Astrophotography so I order this wedge (and cheaper with shipping than I could get it here in Oz) Does what it needs to do, is a little bit tricky to align here in the southern hemisphere, but now it's a 2 minute job. I like it even if I am not taking photos, just seems to track better on the wedge.
Date published: 2014-12-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from 8 Equatorial wedge I bought the Meade Equatorial Wedge for astrophotography, although I have not had the opportunity to use it for astrophotography; the wedge seems to be well built and quite stable with a Meade 8 LX200 SCT attached to it. The wedge does takes some assembling which is pretty easy, but is made much more difficult because of the poorly written instruction manual.
Date published: 2012-01-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Works Well, Issues Still Remain I recently bought this equatorial wedge for my LX200GPS telescope by Meade and had a little trouble setting it up due to a lack of updated instructions. This has been a common complaint, and upon calling Meade, they let me know that this issue is known but they haven't gotten around to updating their manuals to have accurate instructions. I used pictures around the internet to get an idea for how to set up the hardware. Meade said they would email me images of the product fully assembled, but I never received this email and spent about an hour tinkering with it. It is sturdy and has a compass and a level attachable or built into the piece, which works as intended. I would recommend this to others, but with the caveat that they should find some updated images for reference when building. The main issue is attaching the telescope to it sometimes. It is a bit difficult to do by oneself, as the holes don't always align perfectly for the 3 screws. It is doable by yourself with a bit of elbow grease.
Date published: 2012-05-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Usable but quality is not typical of Meade products. The manufacturer of this product did not do well on this version, several wrong or damaged parts not caused by shipping, very poor instructions, and no response from their service email node when inquiring about part replacements. The Meade wedge has changed from the originals 10-15 years ago and the attention to detail is a far cry from the original Meade products I have purchased in the past. The wedge mechanism itself was OK but the hardware is very poor quality. The included compass for instance, is a newer smaller version. (Looks like it was designed to fit the 1.25 lens holes in the storage panel below the tripod, not a 2" diameter as with the original) The compass does not fit in the impression in the knob like the original knob/compass. The bubble level is incorporated in the compass now, even though the aluminum mold has a hole for the "separate" bubble level which is also an impression for a level at the height of the aluminum plate. In addition, the compass I received had leaked fluid (luckily in a plastic bag) and now has a huge bubble in it. The hardware included for the azimuth control was metric, but the holes drilled for 8-32 threads. (Luckily I always have extra hardware around and replaced them) Some hardware included with the wedge is stainless but the thumb screws are simple cold rolled steel, not stainless. (They may corrode if exposed in prolonged "wet" conditions like dew.) In the past, Meade products used the highest quality materials including stainless screws. The aluminum mold for the actual wedge seems to be the same as the original (looking at the original LX200 manual) although the latitude scale seems to be somewhat useless since there is no pointing indicator for the position of the angle adjustment. Maybe I'm missing something here, but I am going to use this for astro-photography and precision is what I need. I did purchase a separate hand compass with tilt scale for alignment of the scope/wedge and camera, which works well for what I need. I was able to get through the issues and have the wedge mounted on my tripod with my camera attached ready to try out. Balance is great, everything seems to work.
Date published: 2018-03-11
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