Photovision 14" Pocket One Shot Digital Target

Photovision 14" Pocket One Shot Digital Target

Photovision 14" Pocket One Shot Digital Target

B&H # PSNOV06167
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  • 1Description

The Photovision 14" One Shot Digital Target is large enough to fill the frame in most situations, but folds to just 6 inches to allow carrying in your pocket or instant access when using with the included belt pouch slip case. Soft silver fabric on the backside creates an efficient reflective surface to open up the shadows. This size has become the favorite of many of the industry's leading wedding photographers.

The Neutral 3-Tone Panels of the One Shot Digital Target allows for custom white balancing, accurate metering and exposure monitoring through the camera's histogram function - all with a single shot. Thereby, vastly improving setup time, and minimizing the need for post correction to your image files. You'll drastically reduce your workflow on the back-end by getting it right on the front-end.

Achieve Perfect Exposures and White Balance Every Time
The Target Folds to One-third of Its Open Size to Fit Easily Into Most Camera Bags
Reflective Soft Silver Fabric on Backside
Includes a 60-minute Instructional DVD Presented by Ed Pierce
In the Box
Photovision 14" Pocket One Shot Digital Target
  • Belt Loop Slipcase
  • Instructional DVD
  • Photovision Limited Warranty
  • Table of Contents
    • 1Description
    Packaging Info
    Package Weight 0.25 lb
    14" Pocket One Shot Digital Target is rated 4.7 out of 5 by 161.
    Rated 2 out of 5 by from Don't be fooled, not color neutral Product is good way to measure exposure. However, the 3 color panels are *NOT* color neutral. If you set a custom white balance with your camera on the card, the gray point average will often render a fairly accurate reading. However, if you photograph the card and later try to measure the color temp and tint, you will be dismayed at the delta between the three panels. All 3 panels should be equally neutral. For instance, use your WB dropper to balance to the gray. Then, check the white. You will get an RGB reading of about: 76-74-73 (tinted warm). Try to take a dropper reading off the white, and your gray will be cool, tinted blue/green. Hardly what I'd call a reliable white balance system.
    Date published: 2009-07-05
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Histogram And White balance friendly This is well made. The size is perfect. I can see the need for larger sizes but not necessary. This tool allows you to set a custom white balance in camera then tweak the meter by manually setting the f stop and shutter speed. Allows. Me to nail exposure by showing camera where white, middle gray, and black are. Histogram should have 3 fingers showing. The left. Finger represents dark color and shadow the middle shows averaged middle tones. The right finger shows high light areas or whites. I find I use this in a studio more than out doors but I have used it several times. On the reverse side is silver backing, an extra daylight reflector in a pinch!
    Date published: 2013-04-30
    Rated 4 out of 5 by from Not as accurate as the one I lost I owned both a 14-inch and 6-inch version of the Photovision Digital Targets, but I lost them in-between shoots recently. I have always loved the ease of post processing with these handy tools, but I find the new version to be extremely warm for custom white balance. It worked fairly well setting it as a custom white balance in-camera, but every time I use it in Lightroom, I have to set the custom white balance from the white portion instead of the gray. In terms of setting the proper exposure, it's a great tool, but that is not the reason I bought it. I'm a little disappointed and still harbor hope that my older versions will show up in our house soon.
    Date published: 2012-10-29
    Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great for exposure correction This is a great aid to ensure you get the right exposure without an incident light meter. It works reasonable well for white balance as well, but not as good as a WhiBal. There is too much variance in color temperature from pixel to pixel using the gray portion of this target. While I used Canon's DPP to process my first shoot with this target, I understand the latest versions of Lightroom allow you to sample a larger area with the dropper tool and get an average to make up for this, I will probably clip a business card sized WhiBal to the center top of this target for better WB.
    Date published: 2013-10-24
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Unbelievably Easy It's amazing how easy it is to get both perfect white balance and perfect exposure with this device. It would probably be possible to get close to the same results with a standard grey card but...I have a standard grey card, but it sits at home in a drawer because it is too awkward to carry. This target folds to about 6 inches in diameter, and is easy to carry on my belt in its case. The black, grey, and white segments, combined with the histogram in your camera allow you to adjust your camera for the perfect dynamic range. The instructions on the included DVD were most helpful.
    Date published: 2008-11-19
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Works as advertised. The One Shot is sort of a glorified gray card. You use it in conjunction with your on-camera histogram to get not just a middle gray, but a highlight & shadow reading as well to make sure you're getting the most value from your scene. I have a much larger one shot target that I never used - it was far too big. This size is just right - about the size of someone's head. Get them to hold the target up to their face, with the highlight side closer to the light so highlight side is where the highlight on their face will be and take a few test shots, adjusting your camera settings & flash until the histogram tells you that you're getting highlight & shadow detail. You can check for blinking highlights too. Once this is done, you can set your white balance using this card too - easier on Canons than Nikons - Canons use the center area of the frame from a picture you've already taken (hence the one shot name). For Nikons you need to fill the frame with the target & tell it to take a white balance from that. Or you can just take a picture of this somewhere in your shooting session & set the white balance in post. Each line on your histogram represents one stop, so you can estimate where you have to go from the photo you took - if the highlight spike is 2 stops down, then you need to increase your exposure by 2 stops through a combination of flash power, aperture, shutter speed (for ambient light), flash to subject distance, and film speed. Anything that adjusts in full stops only will get you in the ballpark - anything that adjusts in half or third stops will let you get close to what this will tell you is a perfect exposure- you want all 3 spikes to be fully contained within the histogram - one in the middle (middle gray), one about 1.5 stops bright, and one about 1.5 stops darker, and none of them too close to the edge (so that you're losing detail). Go through a few tests firsts before using it in the field - you should learn how to read an exposure from this & adjust your equipment accordingly, and what an acceptable reading looks like. The back side of this is a silver foil that you can use to fill shadows or bounce a highlight on someone's face - but not much more than that, it's a very small reflector and all but useless unless you can clamp it to something & make sure the model doesn't move either. It would be better to get a larger reflector - the larger the better, I say, as long as you can still hand-hold it. I originally got the large size target for the large white reflector in on the back, but that was a mistake - it's too big of a target and not a very versatile reflector (with just white on the back). Still, it'll help in a pinch and I've used it taking photos of small products like handbags. Another problem with the reflector is that it's silver, meaning it's specular and depending on how you use it, it may become your key light, so you'd be setting your exposure to that. For example if you put your subject in shadow & use the silver reflector to push light from the sky into their face. Well how do you get a reading for the reflected light now coming off of their face? Still, the manufacturer has to do something with the back of the card, and a silver reflector will probably sell more items than a gray card, which may actually be more useful (though would be them admitting that a gray card is just as good if not better in some circumtances). But if you use the reflector as fill (as you may with flash photography) then it won't change the expoosure enough to matter - so I think that's what it's designed for, a fill light reflector for flash photography. It folds down to about 1/3 its size with a simple twist - hold it on each side in each hand and twist in opposite directions. It comes in a convenient bag made out of some sort of thick canvas-like nylon type material. The bag has an open top (no zipper) and a loop in the back with some velcro, presumably for mounting it on a belt or camera bag (just be careful, with no zipper, if you have it sideways it could fall out). So how does it differ from a gray card? How is it better, how is it worse? The closest equivalent gray card (the 20 Lastolite) is about the same price and size (but with a white reflector on the back rather than silver - at this size a white reflector isn't very useful), and you can get 8x10 cardstock gray cards much cheaper. A gray card works in mostly the same way, and in fact is even easier to work with. A gray card is a neutral, middle gray, and you can use the same basic procedure to set your camera's exposure with a gray card. For natural light photography, you point the camera at the gray card and set the exposure to 0, and then take a white balance. Bam you're done, no messing with histograms - you can't do that with the one shot target. If you're doing flash photography, then you go through a similar process as with the one shot - checking your histogram for that middle gray spike and trying to get as close to that as possible. The supposed advantage of the One Shot is that it will tell you if you've blown out your highlights or shadows, but you can generally do that by just looking at a photo you just took and looking for blinking highlights, and the exposure readings it gives you won't be radically different from a gray card. Still, if you want accuracy in your workflow, it's the same price as an equivalent collapsible gray card, so why not, plus the silver foil back will push more (and more specular) light at your subject than the white back of the Lastolite 20 gray card. Another thing to be aware of - natural light photographers - sunset light changes very quickly, and the sun going behind clouds change things very quickly too, so when you get a reading with this or a gray card, it could be accurate for mere moments. At times like this I find it better to shoot using an auto exposure mode (program, shutter priority, aperture priority), unless I'm combining flash with ambient, or otherwise want fine control over my exposure - and then I may want to use this to get my flash exposure accurate. One of the other reviewers mentions that he just walks up close to get the correct exposure. This is fine. In fact, you can use this for more than one person - just take a shot for each location you want to expose for - once for each person's face. Exposures don't change if you, the photographer, move around, as long as the light hitting the subject stays the same - e.g. natural light or off-camera flash. Be aware though that cheap zoom lenses that have different a maximum aperture throughout the length of the zoom will change your exposure as you zoom unless you set it to its smallest maximum aperture or less. This product is really for someone who shoots with good glass - primes or zooms with fixed maximum apertures & in manual mode, but then the same is true for gray card users. For what it is, it's great, and for flash photography it's as good as a gray card if not better. For natural light photography, a gray card is better because you can get a reading off of it without going to the histogram - just fill your frame with the card and adjust your settings. The silver reflector is a welcome addition, but not as good as a larger reflector and a gray card would be more useful. Is it better than a gray card for getting better exposures? I guess marginally so - if you're into super accuracy, especially with regards to highlights.
    Date published: 2010-08-26
    Rated 5 out of 5 by from Pocket sized winner! 5 stars. This little wonder has saved me more than once. By pre-rolling a bit of video at the beginning of your shoot, or grabbing a still in your series, you can grab a solid black, Neutral gray and a good white under your particular lighting circumstances that will save you a lot of potential headache in editing. Once the footage is in your editing program, just sample the three colors with your color picker as your white, black and gray and you're ready to rock and roll your edit. The shiny silver back side can sure be handy in a pinch, too.
    Date published: 2010-06-23
    Rated 4 out of 5 by from Perfect size, great (not perfect) color and exposure Photovision makes this device in 3 sizes. The 6 is too small to be really useful, trust me. The 24 is too big and clunky to carry easily. This, the 14, is the perfect size to use and carry. Fits in the camera bag or even your pants pocket. The only reason I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 is that the grey panel is not a perfect 18% grey. If they work on getting a more neutral color, this thing would be perfection! I would also prefer the flip side to be all 18% grey-the reflector is too small to be of much use, but occasionally a large grey card could be of help with exposures, like at weddings.
    Date published: 2015-05-04
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