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Plustek OpticFilm 120 Film Scanner

BH #PLOF120 • MFR #783064365642
Plustek
Plustek OpticFilm 120 Film Scanner
Key Features
  • Scan 35mm Negatives/Slides & 120 Film
  • Optical Resolution: 5300dpi
  • Automatic Batch Scanning
  • Color Depth: 48-Bit
The OpticFilm 120 Film Scanner from Plustek converts all your 35mm negatives, mounted slides, and 120mm medium format film into digital files you can edit and view on the computer. It can do this quickly with an automatic batch scanning feature and uses a high resolution 5300dpi sensor with 48-bit color depth to capture all the detail from your originals. The newly redesigned film holders ensure proper positioning during scanning and ensure the images won't be skewed or misaligned. The scanner's built-in infrared channel provides dust and scratch removal without cumbersome post processing. Additionally, the included IT 8 calibration slide ensures accurate color results the first time, reducing the need for repeated scans or extensive post processing color correction.
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Plustek 120 Overview

  • 1Description
  • 2Scan At 5300dpi Optical Resolution
  • 3Newly Redesigned Film Carriers
  • 4Compact Design
  • 5Powered By LaserSoft Imaging SilverFast

The OpticFilm 120 Film Scanner from Plustek converts all your 35mm negatives, mounted slides, and 120mm medium format film into digital files you can edit and view on the computer. It can do this quickly with an automatic batch scanning feature and uses a high resolution 5300dpi sensor with 48-bit color depth to capture all the detail from your originals. The newly redesigned film holders ensure proper positioning during scanning and ensure the images won't be skewed or misaligned. The scanner's built-in infrared channel provides dust and scratch removal without cumbersome post processing. Additionally, the included IT 8 calibration slide ensures accurate color results the first time, reducing the need for repeated scans or extensive post processing color correction.

The included SilverFast Ai Studio 8 works together with the scanner to improve your workflow and ensure proper results the first time. This updated version features an improved user interface and provides an advanced preview option that lets you see the results of adjustments beforehand.

Scan At 5300dpi Optical Resolution

The scanner features an 8-element glass lens with 5,300 dpi optical resolution, high-sensitive color CCD and a 48-bit color depth. The scanner delivers an effective usable Dynamic Range of 4.01 for accurate color as well as full highlight and shadow details

Automatic Batch Scanning

The OpticFilm 120 uses an automatic motorized film transport system that facilitates batch scanning and speeds up the scanning workflow

Newly Redesigned Film Carriers

The OpticFilm 120 includes patent-pending, adjustable pitch 120 film holders that ensure the film lays flat for improved in-focus scans. The OpticFilm 120 also uses an automatic motorized film transport system that speeds up the scanning workflow

Compact Design

The compact OpticFilm 120's metal case provides isolation and stability for the lens, CCD and automatic transport assemblies. The rear cover design reduces the scanner's overall dimensions and prevents dust from entering the scanner

Powered By LaserSoft Imaging SilverFast

Software plays as important a role as hardware to deliver high quality images. The OpticFilm 120 comes with the world-recognized professional film scanning software, SilverFast Ai Studio 8. SilverFast provides users and professionals with tools for scanning, editing, and color reproduction. SilverFast iSRD helps dust and scratch removal and optimizes images. SilverFast Multi-Exposure increases the dynamic range and reduces noises.

Plustek 120 Specs

Film Types35 mm negatives
35 mm slides
120 film
Scan SensorCCD
Lens8-element glass lens
Optical Resolution5300 dpi
Color DepthColor - Input: 48-bit
Color - Output: 24/48-bit output
Grayscale - Input: 16-bit
Grayscale - Output: 8/16-bit
Batch ScanningYes
Dynamic Range4.01
InfraredBuilt-in
Scan Area2.36 x 4.72" (60 x 120 mm)
InterfaceUSB 2.0
OS CompatibilityWindows: Windows 8, Windows 7, Vista, XP
Mac: OS X 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8
Windows System Requirements2 GHz processor, 2 GB RAM (4 GB recommended), 10 GB disk space, DVD or internet connection
Apple System Requirements2 GHz processor, 2 GB RAM (4 GB recommended), 10 GB disk space, DVD or internet connection
Light SourceLED
Power Requirements110 to 220 V AC (US wall plug)
Dimensions8.27 x 14.72 x 7.44" (210 x 374 x 189 mm)
Weight12.57 lb (5.7 kg)
Packaging Info
Package Weight27 lb
Box Dimensions (LxWxH)23 x 17 x 16"
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YOUR RECENTLY VIEWED ITEMS

Does this scan old 60mmx60mm (picture) 70mmx70mm ...

Does this scan old 60mmx60mm (picture) 70mmx70mm (frame) mounted slides?
Asked by: Daniel
Those sound like 120 format 6x6 slides. You can scan 120 format 6x6 film, but you would need to remove the slides from the mounts.
Answered by: Plustek US
Date published: 2019-03-25

question

Is it really sealed against dust? If the negative is 100% clean when inserted, will the scan be 100% clean?
Asked by: Anonymous
Not sure about the dust sealing... But if your neg is 100% clean the scan will be clean adequately.
Answered by: Roman P.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

This has similar DMAX specs to the Epson V800/V850, but does it translate to comparable performance? V850 is almost half the price but I worry that the Epson DPI is an inflated stat (fake news) based on digital interpolation.
Asked by: Chris
Hi, in terms of pure image quality, the OF120 will far exceed the Epson performance. I have both. The OF120 has a stated optical resolution of 5300PPI, and testing shows it to be somewhere in the 4K range, depending on how you interpret the results of the Air Force test image. The other advantage is that the OF120 can take multiple samples at each position of the scan head to drive down noise. The Epson can only take one sample at each location of the scan head, so if you want to get the same benefit of multiple samples to average down noise, the scan head has to make multiple passes for each number of samples you want, plus another for multi-exposure, and another for Infrared (If I remember correctly). So if you want to measure each point on your slide/negative 16 times, the head has to move over the entire image 16 times (18 if you include IR and ME). As there is always slop in a mechanical system, the odds of the head reading the very same point on the negative each pass are low. This leads to a softening of the image.That same testing methodology puts the Epson 700/750/800/850 family at the low 2000's range (2250 PPI). So for pure resolution, the OF120 is the clear winner. I believe test show that the Dmax of the OF120 far exceeds the Epson. My experience has been that the Epson physical architecture allows more light pollution into images due to both the large light source and ambient light coming in from the side. Overall, my gut feeling is that scans done on the Epson look like scans, whereas the images from the OF120 look like they were perfectly captured by a digital camera (not in a bad way)while still containing the essence of film.However, this is all moot to me, as I cannot get the G--Damn OF120 to work with either Silverfast or Vuescan. I've sent one back already due to horrible noises, and locking up while making those horrible noises. The replacement unit has the same problems and I think the gear-train has broken in less than 24 hours (I am an engineer who has built rockets and satellites for 20 years, so I am familiar with precision measuring equipment, and have not abused the unit). VueScan support is spotty at best, and SilverFast is the antichrist of scanning software. A problem I am having with both the first and 2nd unit is that I will get the preview of the image I want to scan all lined up, but the actual scan will start halfway down the image I want to capture and continue into the next image and cover the first half of that image. Also, I have noticed that when the image I want to capture is the last of 3, in a holder designed for 4 images, the scanner will capture half an image of nothing but the light source. By looking at this, I can see stripes that tell me the sensor line-array has problems.I am going to return this one and move on to using a DSLR with a macro lens and a light table with camera mount to scan my medium and large format images. It is much faster, and if combined with HDR techniques, you'll capture highlight and shadow detail and frankly move much faster. The downside is that you will have to manually deal with dust and scratches, and if you want to capture medium and large format images with a resolution higher than your DSLR, you have to take multiple partially-overlapping images of the slide/negative and stitch them together in the imaging software of your choice. It's still quicker than taking 18 passes with a dedicated scanner. There are great articles on the web about this, as well as videos on you-tube. Check it out!
Answered by: James J.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

Any known issues with Windows 10?
Asked by: marcus h.
There are no issues with Windows 10 using this scanner.
Answered by: James B.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

Does the Plustek OpticFilm 120 film scanner work with Australian power (240V AC)?
Asked by: Anonymous
It comes with a D.C. Power adapter, which can work for both voltage
Answered by: Sanjiv J.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

How does this compare to the Epson V850? I looking for a scanner for 6X7 negatives.
Asked by: Vladimir
The image quality is better than that of the Epson, but the scanner is less versatile if you have other requirements (reflective scans, large format etc). For 135 and MF, it is excellent.
Answered by: Eoin C.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

How long does it take to scan?
Asked by: Anonymous
Depending on the resolution you are scanning at 10+ minutes a frame. Its not a peed demon but the results are worth the wait.
Answered by: Tony K.
Date published: 2018-08-28

question

What is the output file? Is there an option for raw output
Asked by: eugenio
Yes you can scan to a DNG file which is a raw file. The scanner comes with SilverFast scanning software that allows you to save a file to different file formats. DNG is a raw format that can be imported into LightRoom or PhotoShop.
Answered by: Rich D.
Date published: 2018-08-28
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