Introducing Zenit Lenses

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Contemporary releases from the classic Russian manufacturer, Zenit has just released a series of prime lenses offering traditional, unique, and creative image quality within a variety of focal lengths and mount options. For Sony E mirrorless shooters, the Zenitar 50mm f/0.95 is an ultra-fast normal-length prime designed to excel in low-light while offering great control over depth of field. It features a 14-blade diaphragm, has a manual focus design for working with subjects as close as 2.3' away, and has a de-clicked aperture ring to benefit its use in video applications.

Zenitar 50mm f/0.95 Lens
Zenitar 50mm f/0.95 Lens

For SLR shooters, Zenit has released an update to a classic portrait-length prime with the MC-Helios #40-2 85mm f/1.5, available for Canon EF, Nikon F, and M42 mounts. This lens is based on the Helios optical design, which itself was inspired by the ZEISS Biotar design, and gives a distinct swirly bokeh-infused image quality with a sharp central region. The bright f/1.5 design also contributes to isolating subjects and suits working in available lighting conditions. In addition to this uniquely creative 85mm, Zenit has also launched the Zenitar 85mm f/1.4 lens for Can on EF and Nikon F. This short-telephoto offers more contemporary image quality, with even sharpness and more neutral rendering, and also features a manual focus design for working with subjects as close as 2.8' away. Also in the portrait-length realm is the MC-Zenitar 50mm f/1.2 S, for Canon EF and Nikon F, which is designed specifically for APS-C-format sensors. This lens is characterized by its bright f/1.2 maximum aperture and nine-blade diaphragm for working with selective focus and smooth bokeh.

Zenit MC-Zenitar 50mm f/1.2 S Lens
Zenit MC-Zenitar 50mm f/1.2 S Lens

Finally, on the other end of the focal length spectrum, Zenit also has a pair of fisheye lenses, with the MC-Zenitar 8mm f/3.5 Fisheye, for Canon EF and Nikon F, and the Zenitar 16mm f/2.8 Fisheye, for Canon EF, Nikon F, and M42. Both of these ultra-wide prime lenses offer an immense 180° angle of view but differ in that the 8mm lens is a circular fisheye design while the 16mm is a diagonal fisheye design that covers the entire image frame.

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