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Posted 01/09/2019
On this week's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two artists whose work blurs the line between street photography, documentary, installation and digital art, while cultivating a contemporary interpretation of the art and craft of collage. Both artists utilize photography-based processes and take urban architecture and street scenes as their subject, but from there, the work goes in very different directions. Jennifer Williams creates large, often site-specific collages that inspect but distort the architectural scenes she documents. As she has stated, “The rectilinear shape that is the traditional photograph never fulfilled my desire to show everything in space," and that will be immediately clear upon seeing her work. Layering images of buildings upon one another, she creates angular and abstract collages while still providing a path for the viewer to connect the image she creates with the neighborhood or street that she photographed. Williams speaks about her process, including the original imaging, her manipulation in post-process, and her large-scale installations, often made on Photo Tex media. Tommy Mintz wrote a software program that creates "automated digital collages" and he has experimented over the years how he (and the program) composes the street scenes he photographs. The tools he uses for image capture and computation have evolved and become more powerful, but unlike the painstaking control Williams exercises over her collages, the key element in Mintz's process is the random arrangement and layering of images that the software creates. This is not to say that his images are out of control—after all, he wrote the program. He selects scenes to photograph and he does adjust the final product in Photoshop, but the software-generated placement of images creates layers, unexpected shadows, multiple exposures and even seeming glitches that add up to an intriguing and whimsical take on street photography. Join us as we learn about the conceptualizations and processes of these two visual artists and hear how they integrate Nodal Ninja, Epson 24" printers, and the Sigma dp2 Quattro Digital Camera into their workflow. Guests: Jennifer Williams and Tommy Mintz City of Tommorow- Manhatten: Billionaire's Row (57th Street) © Jennifer Williams Blacksburg Unfurled (Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia) © Jennifer Williams Surveying Liberty (Newbugrh, NY) © Jennifer Williams The High Line Effect: Approaching Hudson Yards © Jennifer Williams Ladders (Installed at Robert Mann Gallery) © Jennifer Williams © Tommy Mintz © Tommy Mintz © Tommy Mintz © Tommy Mintz © Tommy Mintz Jennifer Williams, Tommy Mintz, and Allan Weitz © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/22/2018
On this week’s B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome three members of the Kamoinge photography workshop and, through their collective eyes, we discuss African-American photography of the past sixty years and the role that Kamoinge has played in nurturing and presenting that photography. We also discuss the making of their current exhibition and the artists involved, called, “The Black Woman: Power and Grace,” which is at the National Arts Club through June 30, 2018. To speak on Kamoinge and the exhibit, we have with us photographers Russell Frederick, Delphine Diallo and Jules Allen. Mr. Frederick is the current vice-president of the collective and provides some historical context and a sense of the mission of the group, which was formed in 1963. Mr. Allen discusses a few of the important figures in the group’s history, including Beuford Smith, Roy DeCarava, and Ming Smith; and Ms. Diallo reflects upon the appeal the workshop held for her when she arrived in Brooklyn, as well as thoughts on the obstacles women photographers still face in our industry. Each brings to the table a personal insight on the range of topics that come up during this humorous, provocative, and historically informative conversation. Kamoinge has deep and significant roots, but it is ever-evolving, and the diverse work of Mr. Frederick, Ms. Diallo, and Mr. Allen is testimony to the wide range of photography that finds a home at Kamoinge. Join us for this lively episode and check out the “Power and Grace” exhibit, at the National Arts Club. Guests: Delphine Diallo, Jules Allen, and Russell Frederick From “womensofnewyork” © Delphine Diallo, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” From “Highness” © Delphine Diallo From “Highness” © Delphine Diallo From “Afropunk” © Delphine Diallo "I got your back." Two best friends declare their friendship and loyalty to each other for life. Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, 2007. © Russell Frederick "We celebrate you. Rest in power." A local marching band honors fallen hometown councilman James Davis. Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. © Russell Frederick Mrs. Edwards stops for a portrait on Easter Sunday right before she heads to the bus. Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, 2009. © Russell Frederick Havana, Cuba. © Jules Allen, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Betty Shabazz at the funeral for her husband, Malcom X. Harlem, N.Y., 1965. ©Adger Cowans, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Dionne Warwick, Maxine Waters, Johnette Besch-Cole, Maya Angelou, Cicely Tyson, and another distinguished woman, 1993 © Eli Reed, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” “Contrast in Black and White.” New York, 1970. © Frank Stewart, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Graduates of Spelman College © John Pinderhughes, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Church ladies. New York, 2005 © Jamel Shabazz, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Dr. Deb Willis. © Terrence Jennings, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Untitled © Salimah Ali, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Delphine Diallo looks at Roy DeCarava photographs. © John Harris Jules Allen © John Harris Russell Frederick, Delphine Diallo, Allen Weitz, Jules Allen © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/27/2018
The simple theme for today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast was to be “how to speak to people in the street when you’d like to take their photo.” For this conversation, we invited two of the best street portraitists in New York— Amy Touchette and Ruddy Roye, both incredibly talented photographers (and writers!) whose work has appeared in the New York Times, New Yorker, Time, Esquire, and many other publications. They are both also very active on Instagram, with work that seems ideally suited for the best that medium has to offer. However, as good conversations often do, ours takes a winding road. We discuss personal and family histories, gentrification, race, and a range of subjects, all along tying these ideas to the fundamental aspects of engaging with people, often strangers, to produce passionate and compassionate street photography. We ask our guests how they approach people, how they describe their work when asking for a photograph, and about the importance of body language and eye contact to convey your intention and develop trust. We also examine the differences in approach when photographing people from cultural and economic backgrounds different than your own, when shooting groups of people and, finally, we discuss how to handle pushback, requests for money, outright rejections, and even upsetting encounters. For the gearheads, we touch on working with formats from medium format to cellphone, and how that effects your approach and the interaction with your subjects. Join us for this inspiring conversation. Guests: Amy Touchette and Ruddy Roye Top Shot © Amy Touchette 125 St., Harlem, Manhattan, 2017 © Amy Touchette Bedford Ave, Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, 2017 © Amy Touchette Skillman St., Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, 2016 © Amy Touchette From "Personal Ties: Street Portraits in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn" © Amy Touchette From "Personal Ties: Street Portraits in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn" © Amy Touchette From "Personal Ties: Street Portraits in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn" © Amy Touchette © Ruddy Roye © Ruddy Roye © Ruddy Roye © Ruddy Roye © Ruddy Roye From the series “When Living Is a Protest” © Ruddy Roye Amy Touchette © John Harris Ruddy Roye © John Harris Amy Touchette, Ruddy Roye, and Allan Weitz © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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