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Posted 08/04/2017
We tried something a little different with this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. We took three writers from our Explora blog along with us as we visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art to see the much praised photography retrospective, Irving Penn: Centennial. Upon our return we gathered to talk about the exhibit and the influential work of Irving Penn. If you love photography, the name Irving Penn should be familiar to you, but this retrospective places equal emphasis on work that falls outside the realm of his famed fashion and portraiture for Vogue Magazine and synthesizes his almost 70 years of photography, acquainting us with his still-life, documentary, nudes, and even street photography, as well as with his skills as a printer. Along with our guests Cory Rice, Jill Waterman, and Akeem Addy, we talk about the works on view in this retrospective-- what impressed us the most, what confused us, what surprised us, what we learned about the cohesive strength of composition, light, and gesture in Penn’s work, and just how influential he has been on all of our photography, whether we realize it or not. Guests: Jill Waterman, Cory Rice, Akeem Addy Rochas Mermaid Dress (Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn), Paris, 1950. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York © Condé Nast Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes, 1957. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Fishmonger, London, 1950. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © Condé Nast Cuzco Children, 1948. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © Condé Nast Cigarette No. 37, New York, 1972. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation After-Dinner Games, New York, 1947. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © Condé Nast Three Asaro Mud Men, New Guinea, 1970. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Single Oriental Poppy, New York, 1968. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Marlene Dietrich, New York, 1948. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Tribesman with Nose Disc, New Guinea, 1970. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Truman Capote, New York, 1948. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, © The Irving Penn Foundation Glove and Shoe, New York, 1947. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, © Condé Nast Irving Penn’s Rolleiflex camera on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photograph by John Harris Jill Waterman, Allan Weitz, Cory Rice, Akeem Addy. Photograph by John Harris Previous Pause Next All Photographs by Irving Penn, except where noted DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/10/2017
Today’s episode broadens our normal photographic sphere as we discuss ophthalmic photography and how the eye’s own optical system is used in conjunction with camera equipment—some techniques very common, some not so—to examine the interior of the eye and to diagnose illnesses that go far beyond problems with vision. We are joined by Mark Maio, clinical medical and ophthalmic photographer and developer of the first high-resolution digital imaging system in ophthalmology. We talk with Maio about his early interest in social justice photography, working as a “jack-of-all-trades” photographer for a hospital, and how his eventual concentration in ophthalmic photography led to early adoption of digital technology and the development of a tool that helped to transform the industry. Throughout this conversation, we learn about the use of analog and digital photography in the biomedical field and how fundus cameras and other specialized gear are used to diagnose optical and systemic maladies. When the pupil is dilated, they eye becomes a portal into the body, and with the proper tools, we can see inside our corporeal system without cutting. Maio is also an accomplished fine art and documentary photographer, and we will also discuss how these various disciplines have intersected throughout his career and resulted in the workshops he leads on ophthalmic imaging, documentary, and landscape photography on the beautiful Isle of Skye. Guest: Mark Maio From the series Saving Sight-- The Flying Eye Hospital From the series Against the Grain – Buffalo Grain Industry From the series, Isle of Skye Previous Pause Next All photographs by Mark Maio DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/21/2016
We have been looking forward to this conversation for weeks. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we sit down with retired Detective 1 st Grade Michael Cunningham, of the New York City Police Department, to talk about crime-scene unit photography. Cunningham is an expert on crime scene photography and forensics—in addition to his twenty-seven years with the NYPD, he has worked as a trainer for the Department of Homeland Security, authored a book on crime-scene management, and currently works providing case-management solutions to law enforcement agencies for Leeds, LLC. We discuss aspects of crime-scene photography, from camera and lens selection to shooting technique, storage, retrieval, and sharing of images. We compare the use of film and digital imaging and the challenges and benefits brought on by new technology. In addition, we talk about photos used for case solving and those of evidentiary value and the different photography departments within the NYPD. Cunningham walks us through the procedures and shot selection of a photographer when approaching a crime scene, and the protocols involved when documenting it. He also regales us with a few stories of his many investigations during his years on the force. Guest: Michael Cunningham Below photographs courtesy © M. Cunningham Detective Mike Cunningham at work Detective Mike Cunningham at work Detective Mike Cunningham at work Michael Cunningham and Allan Weitz   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 08/11/2016
There are good reasons for this episode to have a two-in-one headline. Our initial idea for this show was to discuss the role that happenstance and luck play in photography, but the conversation with our impassioned and articulate guests, Amy Touchette and Gus Powell, quickly turned to a more generalized chat on the principles and practices of street photography—and how lucky we were to have them speak intimately about their work and on photography as an artistic and personal endeavor. For me, it doesn’t get much better! But back to the two headlines within a headline—perhaps it is our collaboration with chance and a photographer’s ability to recognize, organize, prepare for, and even control what is referred to as chance that is the true essence of street photography. As better writers than I have written, “You make your own luck, Gig,” or “Luck is not chance, it's toil; fortune's expensive smile is earned.” Finally, and this quote seems made for the street photographer: “Chance favors those in motion.” Drop us a comment if you can name the above-quoted writers and share with us a story on how you collaborated with chance to make a wonderful photo. Photograph above © Gus Powell Guests: Amy Touchette and Gus Powell   Chelsea, Manhattan, 2013 (Rolleiflex)   from The Insiders (Rolleiflex)   from Street Dailies, South Williamsburg/Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, 2016 (iPhone)   from Street Dailies, Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, 2014 (iPhone) Photographs by Amy Touchette   from The Company of Strangers   from The Company of Strangers   from Mise en Scène   from The Lonely Ones Photographs by Gus Powell Gus Powell, Allan Weitz, and Amy Touchette Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/13/2016
Well, what does that mean? Yes, it’s owned by Facebook and yes, Taylor Swift has 62 million followers, but we asked two professional photographers with hundreds of thousands of followers and a magazine editor how they use Instagram to engage their followers, interest clients, raise revenue, and keep the creative blood flowing. DSLR or smartphone? Hashtag or not? Strategies for gaining followers? More important than your webpage? Is it the most important brand in photography? These are some of the questions we ask in this casual conversation with three savvy veterans of social media. Since Instagram is already five years old, we also discuss future possibilities for this incredible image platform. Guests: Sharon Radisch, Sam Horine, and Libby Peterson To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS.         Instagram page of Sam Horine         Instagram page of Sharon Radisch   Instagram page of Rangefinder Magazine     b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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