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Posted 11/29/2018
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photographer Rick McGinnis and curator Julie Grahame, to discuss blogging and archiving. While this is certainly a broad subject, we will focus on the work of our two guests while considering how best to keep a collection of photos vibrant and valuable. Rick McGinnis is a veteran portrait, editorial, and travel photographer based in Toronto. Most of his assignments and self-assignments had been for local newspapers and magazines and, when this professional landscape changed and motivation was lacking, he almost got out of the business entirely. With a little encouragement, he began to explore the many images he had shot over the previous twenty years—some he had never even viewed—despite being gorgeous portraits of well-known musicians, actors, and artists. The result of this deep dig was a blog he simply called someoldpicturesitook. The blog proved to be an avenue not only into his past, but to his future, because images never seen were now appreciated, discussed, shared, and ultimately, licensed. McGinnis is now on to a new travel blog  and a new chapter in his career, and we will hear what he has learned along the way. Curator, consultant, and writer  Julie Grahame is the publisher of aCurator.com, a full-screen photography magazine, and the associated aCurator blog. She directed the Retna photo agency for 16 years and currently represents the estate of Yousuf Karsh for image licensing and maintains the extensive karsh.org website. We speak with Grahame about the benefits of a blog compared to a website, Instagram, or in her case, a webzine, and we discuss her relationship with the Karsh archive and insights she has drawn from licensing his iconic portraits. Throughout the humorous conversation, we consider Google search tools, tagging, preferred blogging sites, and repurposing older work, but we also touch on the personal, professional, and historical importance of valuing and maintaining your photo collection. Guests: Julie Grahame and Rick McGinnis Fela Kuti, 1989 © Rick McGinnis John Waters, 1987 © Rick McGinnis Patti Smith, 1995 © Rick McGinnis Jay McInerney, 1998 © Rick McGinnis Bjork, 1997 © Rick McGinnis Anne Hathaway, 2004 © Rick McGinnis Rebecca Hall, 2016 © Rick McGinnis Kinky Friedman, 2016 © Rick McGinnis Dwight Eisenhower, 1946 © Yousuf Karsh Ernest Hemingway, 1957 © Yousuf Karsh Winston Churchill, 1941© Yousuf Karsh Ansel Adams and Yousuf Karsh, Courtesy Yousuf Karsh Archive Rick McGinnis © John Harris Rick McGinnis and Julie Grahame © John Harris Rick McGinnis, Allan Weitz, and Julie Grahame © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/21/2018
Today we welcome two of professional basketball’s best photographers, and that’s not just me talking. Nat Butler is Senior Photographer for NBA Entertainment and has worked the last thirty-three NBA Finals. He is also the official photographer for the New York Knicks and Brooklyn Nets. Andrew Bernstein is the longest-tenured official NBA photographer, the photographer for the L.A. Lakers and L.A. Clippers, a recent inductee to the NBA Hall of Fame, and the photographer of the new book, The Mamba Mentality, by Kobe Bryant. So, enough of the bona fides, these two photographers are also great friends, and they bring their easy-going banter and the ultimate insider’s perspective to the B&H Photography Podcast. Our conversation covers a wide range of topics, from the gear they use (and what they don’t), to the lighting systems they’ve developed, the intimacy of basketball photography compared to other sports, and how fashion and social media has affected their day-to-day work. We also dig into the shooting strategies they employ for each game and how their images are used by NBA Photos. Butler noted that in the past, a cover photo on Sports Illustrated would have been seen by approximately 3 million subscribers and, now, with tethering and instant feeds, a game photo can be seen by up to 30 million subscribers to the NBA Instagram feed within five minutes of the photo having been taken. Whether you are into sports photography, event and production photography, or NBA history, this easy-going episode is for you. Guests: Nat Butler and Andrew Bernstein Patrick Ewing at Madison Square Garden © Nathaniel S. Butler / NBAE / Getty Images Larry Bird and Magic Johnson © Nathaniel S. Butler / NBAE / Getty Images Tim Duncan © Nathaniel S. Butler / NBAE / Getty Images Bill Russell © Nathaniel S. Butler / NBAE / Getty Images Kobe Bryant, 1996 © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Kobe Bryant © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson, 2009 © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein, Photograph courtesy Andrew Bernstein Magic Johnson, 1987 NBA Finals Game 4 winning shot © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Kevin Durant and Steph Curry, 2017 NBA Finals © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images LeBron James, 2018 © Andrew Bernstein / NBAE / Getty Images Nat Butler and Andy Bernstein, 1980s Photograph courtesy Andrew Bernstein Nat Butler and Andy Bernstein, 2018 © John Harris Allan, Andrew, and Nat on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/15/2018
We tried something new for this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast —we ventured into the B&H SuperStore to interview camera shoppers, fans of the podcast, and attendees of the Panasonic Lumix Day Event. We coordinated with our marketing team and organized a sweepstakes to give away a Lumix DMC-GX85 Mirrorless camera with a 12-32mm lens and a 45-150mm lens. We became acquainted with our audience a bit better by asking people two simple questions and chatting with them about photography. The first question was: “Which is the favorite photo you have ever taken?” and the second question was, “How would winning a GX85 change your photography?” The answers were as varied and entertaining as one would expect, and we include several of these short conversations in this episode. When we finished our recordings, we randomly picked a winner of the sweepstakes, and the winner will also be announced toward the end of the show. Because we were recording as part of the Lumix Day event, several interesting photographers and videographers, each a Lumix ambassador, were speaking at the B&H Event Space. After their talks, they joined us for a brief chat, and we include these conversations with documentary filmmaker Griffin Hammond, lifestyle photographer Jeff Carpenter and wedding and travel photographer William Innes. Each brings insight to his respective disciplines, and the engagement with shoppers and fans is not to be missed.  Join us for this fast-paced and entertaining episode. Guests: Jeff Carpenter, William Innes, Griffin Hammond, B&H SuperStore Shoppers William Innes © John Harris Griffin Hammond © John Harris Jeff Carpenter © John Harris Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX85 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera Lumix G Vario 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 Lens Lumix G Vario 45-150mm f/4-5.6 Lens B&H customer Vivian speaks with Allan Weitz © John Harris B&H customer Joseph speaks with the podcast team © John Harris B&H customer Katia speaks with the podcast team © John Harris B&H customer Jenny speaks with the podcast team © John Harris B&H customer Stanley speaks with the podcast team © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/08/2018
When we finished recording this episode, Jay Maisel asked us which podcast episode was our favorite. It didn’t take Allan a second to answer, “This one!” While we have almost one-hundred and fifty to choose from, there is no doubt that this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is very memorable. Once we turned the mics on, nobody wanted this conversation to end and, indeed, it runs longer than 80 minutes, but it is worth every minute. When listening to Jay Maisel and Stephen Wilkes talk, time doesn’t fly—it soars. The reason we have two such remarkable photographers and long-time associates on together is because this weekend, at the DOC NYC Film Festival, Wilkes is premiering his documentary about Maisel, called Jay Myself. We sat with Maisel and Wilkes to discuss the making of the film and their personal and professional relationship that has lasted for almost 40 years. At the heart of the film is Maisel’s former residence and studio, the six-story, 30,000 square-foot Germania Bank building that he bought, in 1967, and sold in 2014 for a tidy profit. This massive space, almost as legendary as Maisel himself, must be emptied before Maisel is to move, and Wilkes was there to capture this undertaking. The movie touches upon themes of mentorship, mortality, visual creativity, and the changing face of New York City, but along with the remarkable space he created, the film focuses on the life, work, and legacy of Maisel himself. It is a loving tribute from one photographer to another, one friend to another. Our conversation is filled with the type of creative insight and humor that these towering figures in contemporary photography can bring. Join us for this fascinating conversation and see the trailer of the film here. Part I, Maisel and Wilkes: 00:00- 38:40 Part II, Jay Myself and The Bank: 39:00 – 83:50 Guests: Jay Maisel and Stephen Wilkes Poster for the film, "Jay Myself"; Courtesy Mind Hive Films Stephen Wilkes and Jay Maisel in “The Bank,” 2014, Photograph Courtesy Mind Hive Films Singapore © Jay Maisel Allan Weitz with Jay Maisel and Stephen Wilkes on the B&H Photography Podcast, Photograph © John Harris Stephen Wilkes and Jay Maisel, Photograph © John Harris Stephen Wilkes, Photograph © John Harris Jay Maisel, Photograph © John Harris Stephen Wilkes and Jay Maisel, Photograph © John Harris Allan Weitz and Jay Maisel, Photograph © John Harris Stephen Wilkes and Jay Maisel, Photograph © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/01/2018
When you think of an image from your favorite movie, what comes to mind? Is it a well-edited sequence, a dramatic crescendo, or perhaps simply a static photo, maybe even the poster art itself? If it is a static image, chances are it’s a photo taken by an on-set “still” photographer. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we discuss this craft with two photographers who make their living  as still photographers, working on location and in-studio on television and film productions alongside the camera assistants, boom operators, grips, DPs and myriad crew members, who make the movie magic. Joining us are  JoJo Whilden, a fine art and still photographer who has worked on numerous films, including Silver Linings Playbook and The Fighter and television series such as Orange Is the New Black, and Homeland. Her clients include HBO, Netflix, CBS, Sony, and Killer Films. She is the 2018 recipient of The Society of Camera Operators Lifetime Achievement Award in Still Photography. Also joining us in the studio is David Giesbrecht, an editorial and still photographer with credits on The House of Cards, The Blacklist, Mr. Robot, Jessica Jones, and many other programs and films. We speak with Giesbrecht and Whilden about the specific photography skills required on-set, the working relationship within a film crew, their gear setup, and the changes that the profession has seen with the onset of digital streaming, cell phones, mirrorless cameras, social media, and the growth of the episodic television series. This is a very informative episode about a craft that is often overlooked and misunderstood. Guests: JoJo Whilden and David Giesbrecht  From “Orange is the New Black”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “Boardwalk Empire”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “Olive Kitteridge”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “A Late Quartet”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “The Fighter”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden John Turturro directing “Fading Gigolo”, Photograph Courtesy JoJo Whilden From “Jessica Jones”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht From “Jessica Jones”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht From “Luke Cage”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht From “House of Cards”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht Box art from “The Tick”, Photograph Courtesy David Giesbrecht JoJo Whilden and David Giesbrecht hamming it up in the podcast studio Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/25/2018
Can you imagine a better perspective? On today's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two shooting buddies who, perhaps not so coincidentally, happen to be talented and inspirational landscape photographers. Ryan Dyar and Miles Morgan are both well recognized for their gorgeous "land-based" landscape photography and post-production skills, but over the past few years, both have incorporated drone photography into their workflow. Our show today is a discussion of their aesthetic approach, and of the techniques and gear Dyar and Morgan use to make their stylized landscape images using drones. The topics we discuss are the differences between aerial photography and drone photography (Morgan is also a pilot) and, of course, composing from a tripod as opposed to a monitor image relayed from a few hundred feet in the air. We also talk about camera settings, long-exposure photography, drone choices, flying techniques, how to handle inclement weather, scouting locations, and the legal restrictions on drone operation. It is quite an informative episode, but, what also becomes clear is the camaraderie between Dyar and Morgan and how their friendship not only informs when and where they photograph but also how they work, how they view photography as a practice and, certainly, the influence each has upon the other in terms of their shooting styles. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guests: Miles Morgan and Ryan Dyar Photograph © Miles Morgan © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Ryan Dyar © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan © Miles Morgan Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/19/2018
In less than an hour, this podcast will teach you everything you need to know about night photography. Seriously. While our show is not a tutorial, the conversation is so broad and so deep; it touches upon every aspect of the craft. Guests Gabriel Biderman and Todd Vorenkamp blanket this subject with an engaging and humorous tone—from the psychological predisposition common to night shooters and the science of rods and cones to cameras, gear, apps and a recipe for creating images of star trails. This is truly an episode for all levels of shutterbugs seeking to explore or master image making at night. Well done guys! Guests: Gabriel Biderman and Todd Vorenkamp To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. Thank you for joining our journey into night photography! For more Visualizing the Night content, please click here: Visualizing The Night and share your enthusiasm for the art below in the comments section or reach out to us on social media using #visualizethenight. Thanks for reading!       Photos by Todd Vorenkamp www.trvphoto.com    Photos by Gabriel Biderman www.ruinism.com b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/12/2018
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we get the old band back together for one more gig. Joining us are Explora writers and podcast veterans Todd Vorenkamp and Shawn Steiner. They are not on the show just because we like them so much, but also because they are experts on camera gear and have written up most of the camera news from photokina 2018. In addition, we welcome Dana Glidden, the B&H social media manager, to join us. Glidden attended this year’s camera trade fair, which was held from September 26-29, 2018, in Cologne, Germany. We start the episode with Glidden, who provides an overview of the biggest, and perhaps most important camera expo on the planet, and then we go to Steiner and Vorenkamp to fill us in on the most impressive of the cameras, lenses, and other gear announced at this year’s show. Although announced before photokina, the Canon EOS R and the Nikon Z6 and Z7 mirrorless full-frame cameras were still the biggest draw at the convention. The Zeiss ZX1 Digital Camera, the Fujifilm X-T3 and the Panasonic Lumix S1 and S1R also received their share of attention, as did the new medium format Fujifilm GFX 50R Mirrorless Camera. If it weren’t already clear that high-end mirrorless cameras were in full display this year, a new silver Leica CL Mirrorless Digital Camera was also announced. Many lenses were also unveiled at photokina 2018, including the Zeiss Batis 40mm f/2 lens, the Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens, the Voigtländer NOKTON 50mm f/1.2, as well as several lenses for the new Nikon and Canon full-frame mirrorless systems. Other products discussed on the show are the DJI Mavic 2 Pro, the GoPro Hero 7, the Profoto B10 Off-Camera Flash and the Gitzo Mini Traveler tripod. Join us for this comprehensive overview of the latest cameras and photography gear from this year’s photokina trade fair. Guests: Dana Glidden, Shawn Steiner, Todd Vorenkamp Todd Vorenkamp Dana Glidden Shawn Steiner Allan Weitz, Dana Glidden, Todd Vorenkamp, Shawn Steiner Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/05/2018
Under starry skies, we took our recorders and headphones to a collection of shipping containers in Brooklyn, known as Photoville 2018, and Photoville did not disappoint—what a wonderful collection of photo exhibits. The exhibits span the breadth of photography, but with an overarching theme rooted firmly in documentary and social justice photography. Many shows were sponsored—by the U.S. Marines, by magazines, universities, or collectives; others were curated by New York public-school children, and another by the New York Municipal Archives. As in years past, it was a wonderful, perspective-expanding experience, run by people who love photography. We chatted with organizers and photographers from a handful of the exhibitions. First on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Michael Lorenzini, from the Municipal Archives of the NYC Department of Records. Lorenzini, along with co-curator Matthew Minor, organized the exhibit “NYC Work and Working,” a beautiful selection of images from the collection of the WPA Federal Writer's Project. In addition to discussing the current exhibition, Lorenzini offers details on the Municipal Archive itself, its mission, and the multitude of historical collections it houses. Staying in the New York groove, we met with the instructors and students from the High School of Art and Design and the High School of Fashion Industries. These photography programs, taught by Brenna McLaughlin and Ben Russell, respectively, have been a part of these high schools for decades and embrace traditional darkroom and digital techniques, offering work experience in photography, as well. The students were kind enough to wait for us to arrive after a long day of discussing their work with fellow students during New York Public School Day at Photoville. Next, we speak with Pablo Farias, Isaac Guzman, and Vanessa Crowley of the exhibit, "conSEQUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES" presented by Bats'i LAB. This exhibit and its organizers are invested in creating a photographic community, in Chiapas, Mexico, that can document their struggles and social movements. After a short break, we continue with photojournalist Ron Haviv and Dr. Lauren Walsh, of The VII Foundation exhibit. The focus of our chat is their upcoming film Biography of a Photo,  which traces the impact of two photographs Haviv took earlier in his career, which have left indelible marks on the countries in which they were taken. Both photographs capture isolated acts of cruelty within societies in conflict, and do so with such resonance that they have become iconic images within those societies. Our next stop is the container curated by the Authority Collective and their exhibit “The Lit List: 30 Under-the-Radar Photographers," a show presenting thirty interesting photographers whose work deserves attention. We speak with one of the photographers, Arlene Mejorada, and organizers of the Authority Collective, which is described as a group of gender non-conforming people of color reclaiming their authority in photography. Yes! Finally, we speak with Crista Dix of wall space creative, and artist Deborah Bay, about their exhibit, “Internal Ballistics.” The work here is more accurately categorized as “art” photography, but its beautiful cross-section depictions of bullets and the abstract damage they create fosters an interesting debate about gun violence. Join us for this interesting set of conversations. Guests: Ben Russell, Brenna McLaughlin, Erika Perez, Yaqueline Garcia-Hernandez, Sumona Islam, Tais Rivera, Michael Lorenzini, Pablo Farias, Isaac Guzman, Vanessa Crowley, Ron Haviv, Dr. Lauren Walsh, Arlene Mejorada, Mary Kang, Elaine Cromie, Deborah Bay, Crista Dix From “conSECUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES” © José Angel Rodríguez From “conSECUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES” © Maruch Santiz From “conSECUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES” © Tragameluz Collective “Biography of a Photo” © Ron Haviv, The VII Foundation From “NYC Work and Working” Courtesy of the New York City Municipal Archives From “NYC Work and Working” Courtesy of the New York City Municipal Archives From “The Lit List” © Arlene Mejorado “Internal Ballistics” exhibit Dr. Lauren Walsh and Ron Haviv “Telling a Story and Selling an Idea” exhibit Pablo Farias and Isaac Guzman at the “conSECUENCIAS/conSEQUENCES” exhibit Arlene Mejorado at “The Lit List” exhibit Crista Dix and Deborah Bay Photoville, 2018 Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/21/2018
This year marks the anniversary of the shooting date of two iconic photographs, taken at the same location, forty years apart. In 1958, Art Kane created the image that has come to be known as “A Great Day in Harlem.” The photo presented fifty-seven of the world’s greatest jazz musicians gathered on a stoop on East 126th Street, in Harlem, New York City. Over time, this photo has become legendary: a movie was made about it, and many recreations have been staged around the world, but none as interesting as the photo that was made by the great Gordon Parks, on September 29, 1998, on the same stoop. On that day, organized by the editors of XXL Magazine, almost two-hundred hip-hop artists gathered to be part of a photograph that was called “A Great Day in Hip Hop.” With the 20th anniversary of the 1998 photo approaching, on today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast we will discuss the making of that image. We speak with two of the people responsible for producing the photo: the editor-in-chief of XXL at the time, Sheena Lester, and writer Michael Gonzales. We also welcome back journalist and author Vikki Tobak to the show, whose upcoming book, Contact High: A Visual History of Hip-Hop, discusses the making of this image and, finally, we are joined by artist Fab 5 Freddy, who was a participant in the photo and shares his recollection of that incredible day in Harlem. Also, in the weeks to come, we hope to publish a bonus episode with Jonathan Kane, son of photographer Art Kane, who will bring his insight to the making of and the legacy of his father’s original photo. Guests: Vikki Tobak, Sheena Lester, Michael Gonzales, Fab 5 Freddy Photograph © Gordon Parks; Courtesy of The Gordon Parks Foundation     Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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