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Posted 07/06/2018
The spot where still photography, video, animation, and drawing on your shoes meet is where you can find Sam Cannon and Matthias Brown. They may not always be together at that spot, but they’re sure to be within shouting distance. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we discuss the role that still photography plays in their work and how they see the distinctions between still and moving images, as well as between old and new technologies. Matthias Brown is also TraceLoops, an “animation experiment centered around hand-drawn, physical animations that experiments with the creation and perception of movement.” He specializes in hand-drawn, stop-motion, black-and-white animation and his work has been commissioned by Converse, MTV, Purina, Warby Parker, and others, and his fine art work has been displayed at the Tate Modern. Sam Cannon is an artist and director who works between still photography and video and focuses on the “manipulation of time, space, and the female form.” Whichever format the final image takes—still, video, GIF—her works asks us to explore the “never-ending” moment. She has produced commercial assignments for Nike, Samsung, and H&M, editorial and fashion pieces, and her fine art work has been exhibited extensively, including at MANA Contemporary, in Jersey City. True multi-disciplinarians, Cannon and Brown are comfortable with a variety of techniques and art forms; we discuss rotoscopes and oscilloscopes, After Effects and Dragonframe, projection pieces and soap sculptures. We also talk briefly on camera gear, self-portraiture, William Kentridge and, once and for all, we resolve the pronunciation of GIF. Join us for this enjoyable conversation. Guests: Sam Cannon and Matthias Brown Animation © Sam Cannon Animation © Sam Cannon Animation © Sam Cannon Animation © Sam Cannon Photo © Sam Cannon Photo © Sam Cannon Animation © Matthias Brown Animation © Matthias Brown Animation © Matthias Brown Animation © Matthias Brown Photo © Matthias Brown Photo © Matthias Brown Previous Pause Next NOTE: Please click to view animated images. Sam Cannon & Matthias Brown provided four animated images, and two still photos. DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/29/2018
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome photographer Michael Sanders and model Jayne Moore to discuss the collaborative process between model and photographer on a fashion shoot. From “go-sees” and casting via Instagram, to the rhythm of a shoot, working with on-set teams, lighting insights, and the dos and don'ts of professional interaction, we discuss the P.O.V. from both sides of the lens. The thread that runs through our conversation, though, is how a photographer and a model work together to create the best images to please themselves and their clients. Jayne Moore is represented by IMG Models, and has appeared in Elle, Cosmopolitan, and Marie Claire and in ads for Calvin Klein and L’Oreal, among many others. She has worked with photographers such as Annie Leibovitz, Dean Isidro, and Pamela Hanson, and brings to the conversation an incredible insight, not only to the work of a model, but also to the fashion industry in general and to the role a photographer should play. Michael Sanders is a return guest to our show and a regular contributor to Italian Elle magazine. His work can also be found in the international editions of Vogue, Glamour, and Marie Claire, and in the June, 2018 edition of U.S. Elle he photographed model Hailey Baldwin on the beaches of St. Lucia. Loaded with insight for photographers of any stripe and certainly for aspiring models or anyone interested in the creative fields, this is an enjoyable and informative chat. Join us. Guests: Jayne Moore and Michael Sanders © Michael Sanders for Elle Italia © Michael Sanders for Elle US © Michael Sanders for Elle US © Michael Sanders for Elle International Courtesy Jayne Moore Courtesy Jayne Moore Courtesy Jayne Moore Courtesy Jayne Moore © Pamela Hanson, Courtesy Jayne Moore Courtesy Jayne Moore Michael Sanders, Jayne Moore, Allan Weitz © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/22/2018
On this week’s B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome three members of the Kamoinge photography workshop and, through their collective eyes, we discuss African-American photography of the past sixty years and the role that Kamoinge has played in nurturing and presenting that photography. We also discuss the making of their current exhibition and the artists involved, called, “The Black Woman: Power and Grace,” which is at the National Arts Club through June 30, 2018. To speak on Kamoinge and the exhibit, we have with us photographers Russell Frederick, Delphine Diallo and Jules Allen. Mr. Frederick is the current vice-president of the collective and provides some historical context and a sense of the mission of the group, which was formed in 1963. Mr. Allen discusses a few of the important figures in the group’s history, including Beuford Smith, Roy DeCarava, and Ming Smith; and Ms. Diallo reflects upon the appeal the workshop held for her when she arrived in Brooklyn, as well as thoughts on the obstacles women photographers still face in our industry. Each brings to the table a personal insight on the range of topics that come up during this humorous, provocative, and historically informative conversation. Kamoinge has deep and significant roots, but it is ever-evolving, and the diverse work of Mr. Frederick, Ms. Diallo, and Mr. Allen is testimony to the wide range of photography that finds a home at Kamoinge. Join us for this lively episode and check out the “Power and Grace” exhibit, at the National Arts Club. Guests: Delphine Diallo, Jules Allen, and Russell Frederick From “womensofnewyork” © Delphine Diallo, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” From “Highness” © Delphine Diallo From “Highness” © Delphine Diallo From “Afropunk” © Delphine Diallo "I got your back." Two best friends declare their friendship and loyalty to each other for life. Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, 2007. © Russell Frederick "We celebrate you. Rest in power." A local marching band honors fallen hometown councilman James Davis. Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. © Russell Frederick Mrs. Edwards stops for a portrait on Easter Sunday right before she heads to the bus. Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, 2009. © Russell Frederick Havana, Cuba. © Jules Allen, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Betty Shabazz at the funeral for her husband, Malcom X. Harlem, N.Y., 1965. ©Adger Cowans, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Dionne Warwick, Maxine Waters, Johnette Besch-Cole, Maya Angelou, Cicely Tyson, and another distinguished woman, 1993 © Eli Reed, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” “Contrast in Black and White.” New York, 1970. © Frank Stewart, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Graduates of Spelman College © John Pinderhughes, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Church ladies. New York, 2005 © Jamel Shabazz, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Dr. Deb Willis. © Terrence Jennings, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Untitled © Salimah Ali, included in “The Black Woman: Power and Grace” Delphine Diallo looks at Roy DeCarava photographs. © John Harris Jules Allen © John Harris Russell Frederick, Delphine Diallo, Allen Weitz, Jules Allen © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/15/2018
For this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we return to our conversations from the 2018 OPTIC Conference, hosted by B&H Photo. We spoke with so many wonderful photographers and will present these talks over the coming weeks but, today, we focus on the street photography of two very distinctive photographers. Our first guest is Sisse Brimberg, a veteran adventure and travel photographer who has more than thirty stories for National Geographic to her credit. Much of her work is devoted to historical and cultural stories, but our chat focuses on the informal portraiture she does in the streets, marketplaces, and country roads around the world. Brimberg relates how she is always “seeing” photographs, how she interacts with her subjects, and how to know when a photograph is worth taking. We also discuss her late husband and shooting partner, NatGeo photographer Cotton Coulson, and how her approach to work has changed since his death. After a short break, we speak with Xyza Cruz Bacani, a Magnum Foundation fellow and Fujifilm Ambassador. Born and raised in the Philippines, Bacani is based in Hong Kong, and started her street photography while employed as a domestic worker there. Her street photography blossomed into a career as a documentary photographer covering immigration, social justice, and human rights issues, but she still devotes time to “street.” We discuss the differences between the two disciplines, as well as her street photography techniques and cameras and lens choices. For street, travel, and documentary photographers, this is an episode not to be missed, and subscribe to our podcast for future conversations from OPTIC 2018, including those we had with photographers Keith Carter, Joyce Tenneson, and Seth Resnick. Guests: Sisse Brimberg and Xyza Cruz Bacani © Sisse Brimberg © Sisse Brimberg © Sisse Brimberg © Sisse Brimberg © Sisse Brimberg © Xyza Cruz Bacani © Xyza Cruz Bacani © Xyza Cruz Bacani © Xyza Cruz Bacani © Xyza Cruz Bacani Sisse Brimbeg at OPTIC 2018 © John Harris Xyza Cruz Bacani at OPTIC 2018 © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/08/2018
Hosted by B&H Photo, the 2018 OPTIC Conference for Outdoor and Travel Photography was a wonderful opportunity to speak with a diverse group of great photographers, and we did just that. We sat down with a diverse mix of shooters, including Joyce Tenneson, Xyza Cruz Bacani, Keith Carter, and Sisse Brimberg. Over the course of the next few weeks, we will present these conversations, but today we start with National Geographic staff photographer Mark Thiessen, who, in addition to running the photo studio at NatGeo and shooting many stories for the magazine, has continued a twenty-year personal project on wildfires. To know his subject better, to be safer, and to get closer to the action, Thiessen became a certified wildland firefighter and travels to active fires each year to photograph the fires, as well as the property destruction and human toll taken by these wildfires. We speak with Thiessen about his experiences, tools and techniques for photographing fires, and about his other work for National Geographic. We also take a few minutes to catch up with Rod Clark, of Wine Country Camera. At OPTIC 2017, we spoke with Clark about the beautiful filter-holder system he developed, and now we find out how his company has grown since last year, and what Wine Country Camera has brought to the market. Guests: Mark Thiessen and Rod Clark Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "Russian Smokejumpers" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "The Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke" © National Geographic Photograph by Mark Thiessen, from "The Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke" © National Geographic Mark Thiessen on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/01/2018
From massive ensemble photographs to celebrity portraiture, advertising high-rollers, and about every movie and television poster you’ve ever seen, Art Streiber anchors the spot where Hollywood and the magazine industry meet. His versatility and production acumen are well recognized, and our conversation ambles easily through a wide range of subjects, but what remains evident—in addition to his quick wit—is that Streiber is a problem solver. Big concept, small budget? No problem. Giant set piece with 150 A-list subjects? We’ll figure it out. Just you, me, a camera and a hotel room window? Done. Streiber learned early that being a jack-of-all-trades does not correlate to a master-of-none and that the answer is always, “Yes.” In addition to his obvious photographic chops, this attitude seems to be at the heart of his success. With Streiber, we speak about soaking up the magazine aesthetic through his family’s business in Los Angeles, about early rejections, understanding the story behind a photo concept, and how the image “bears the burden” of telling that story. We also dig deep into his archive to discuss specific images of Steven Spielberg, Paul Rudd, Oscar nights, and others. We touch on picture research, budgeting concepts, lighting choices, working with celebrities, seeing big photos on small screens, older CCD sensors, and “how to eat an elephant.” This is a funny and incredibly informative episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. Join us. Guest: Art Streiber Seth Rogen as Cary Grant, in "North by Northwest," 2008 © Art Streiber Paul Rudd as Gene Wilder, in "Young Frankenstein" © Art Streiber Paramount 100th Anniversary Photo, 2012 © Paramount Pictures, Courtesy Art Streiber Campus Climate Challenge Activists © Art Streiber Steven Spielberg, for Empire Magazine © Art Streiber Brie Larson, for WWD, 2016 © Art Streiber Cate Blanchett, for Entertainment Weekly, 2014 © Art Streiber Behind the scenes at the Oscars © Art Streiber Behind the scenes at the Oscars © Art Streiber Behind the scenes at the Oscars © Art Streiber The cast of "The Princess Bride," for Entertainment Weekly, 2011 © Art Streiber The cast of "Taking Woodstock," for Vanity Fair, 2009 © Art Streiber Blaine Lourd, for Conde Nast Portfolio © Art Streiber Art Streiber on B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Allan Weitz and Art Streiber © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/25/2018
What makes a photographer follow their moral compass and photograph the stories they feel need to be told, no matter what the personal costs? Furthermore, how do they do so without the support of a news outlet or even an agency to distribute that work? And then, what if they decide to shoot primarily with black-and-white film?! On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with Greg Constantine, who made and continues to make these decisions. In this affable conversation, we find out what prompted Constantine to pick up a camera and how he made the subject of “statelessness” a recurring theme in his work. We also learn why he continued to shoot film, even after digital became the more affordable and accepted format, and why the more established route of assignments for news outlets was not the best path for his storytelling. We also discuss the financing of his work through a combination of grants, commissions, and out-of-pocket spending, the obstacles to exhibiting documentary photography and, ultimately, the satisfaction of seeing the positive impact his work has had. As mentioned, much of Constantine’s work documents oppressed communities, and he has lived and traveled extensively in Asia and, more recently in Europe, to follow stories of migration and persecution. Specifically, he has worked in Burma with the Rohingya people, with the Nubians in Kenya, and with communities around the world that live without the basic right of citizenship. His current project, Seven Doors, has brought him back to his home country to document stories on immigration detention. Constantine’s work ultimately did make it into well-recognized newspapers. He has published books and won awards, and his work has been exhibited in the halls of the U.S. Capitol Building, but he continues to press forward—guided not by credit lines, but by the desire to grow as a photographer, to be inspired by the people he photographs, and to tell the stories that demand to be told. Join us for this inspiring conversation. Guest: Greg Constantine Kenya, 2008, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Kuwait, 2011, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Italy, 2014, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Iraq, 2014, from “Nowhere People” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine Bangladesh, 2017, from “Exiled to Nowhere: Burma’s Rohingya” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine United States, 2018, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine Malaysia, 2017, from “Seven Doors” © Greg Constantine Greg Constantine on the B&H Photography Podcast © John Harris Allan Weitz and Greg Constantine © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/18/2018
The two-day Depth of Field Conference, hosted by B&H, was an impressive gathering of wedding and portrait photographers, each sharing their unique talents, styles, and techniques with a receptive crowd. We had our microphones ready to speak with some of the photographers before and after their presentations, and offer here our conversations with four exceptional photographers. We chose these four not only because their work is impeccable, but because they possess distinct views on the aesthetics and business of wedding photography. We start with Andy Marcus, of Fred Marcus Studios, one of the preëminent wedding-photography studios in New York, whose clientele includes celebrities, CEOs—and even Presidents and their daughters. With Marcus, we discuss keeping a family business running across three generations, how to work huge weddings, keeping A-list clients satisfied, and the importance of consistency. Next, we are joined by Sara France, of France Photographers, who has taken her business from a “girl with a camera” to a full-service studio with branches in California, Texas, and Hawaii. We speak about how to expand your business across states, the advantages of a woman-run enterprise, and how to best utilize the “blue hour.” France is Sony’s most recent “Artisan of Imagery,” so we also speak about her use of the Sony Alpha series cameras and continuous lighting. After a break, we are joined by Laurent Martin of Helena & Laurent Photography, a Bay Area-based husband-and-wife team who create straight-up gorgeous wedding photos. With Laurent, we discuss presets, using natural light, the joys of the wedding day, and how to embrace the chaos that comes with those joys. The success of this duo is seen in their ability to work together seamlessly, find the magical in small moments, and the lushness of their final product. Finally, we speak with Sal Cincotta, a St. Louis-based photographer running a studio whose team travels extensively. The list of Cincotta’s accomplishments as a wedding photographer would take a second page to list, and he is also an in-demand author and educator and expert on all forms of lighting. He speaks with us about the importance of constantly improving your craft and finding the time to do so. Despite the varied approaches to wedding photography offered by each of our guests, one theme reoccurred in each of the conversations: the need to use your photography to tell the story of a wedding. Guests: Andy Marcus, Sara France, Laurent Martin, Sal Cincotta © Fred Marcus Studio © Fred Marcus Studio © Fred Marcus Studio © Fred Marcus Studio © Fred Marcus Studio © Helena & Laurent Photography © Helena & Laurent Photography © Helena & Laurent Photography © Helena & Laurent Photography © Helena & Laurent Photography Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/10/2018
Appropriately, this is our Mother's Day episode, and our title borrows Maya Angelou’s description of her mother from “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” Photographer Elinor Carucci struck us with some of her own perfect power during this week’s recording of the B&H Photography Podcast. I doubt much stands in her way, but there's a calm too—born of family support, nurtured by maturity, and assured with the confidence that comes from presenting yourself to the world, warts and all—in other words, from “putting yourself out there.” Our talk today is about her photography, particularly her fine art work as represented in her books, Closer, from 2002, and Mother, from 2013. Both works are an exploration of motherhood and family, the first centered on her own mother and, the later book, on herself as a mother, and her children. We do speak about her photographic style and technique, we talk about editing decisions, camera settings, lighting, macro lenses, and how to recreate “spontaneous” moments, but the heart of our conversation is motherhood and family and how an artist portrays family and self, particularly in a manner as personal and intimate as Carucci’s. If you know her work, there should be little surprise that, in conversation, she is candid and open about her process, her talents and her flaws. We talk about burning negatives, authorship, influences that come from strange corners, and just how difficult it is to make a good photo. If you are looking for a “Hallmark moment,” this may not be the episode for you, but if you enjoy an engaged, introspective and, at times, hilarious conversation about art, family, and culture, then settle in for this Mother’s Day present, wrapped for photographers everywhere. Guest: Elinor Carucci Mother puts on my lipstick, 1993 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery Grandparents kiss, 1998 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery My mother’s lips, 1997 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery Mother's head in sink, 1999 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery Zipper mark, 1999 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery Mother drives me in the rain, 2000 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery The woman that I still am #2, 2010 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery Why can't you be nicer to your brother? 2012 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery A doll in a box, 2010 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery Eden and Emmanuelle #2, 2011 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery Love, 2009 © Elinor Carucci, Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery Elinor Carucci © John Harris Allan Weitz and Elinor Carucci © John Harris Allan Weitz and Elinor Carucci © John Harris Allan Weitz and Elinor Carucci © John Harris Allan Weitz and Elinor Carucci © John Harris Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/04/2018
The B&H Photo SuperStore recently hosted the two-day Depth of Field Portrait, Wedding, and Event Photography Conference, in New York City, and invited many talented, experienced photographers to speak and show work. The conference also included representatives from most of the major camera, lens, and lighting companies. We set up our mics close to the main stage, grabbed vendors as they passed by and spoke with them about their latest and greatest offerings for photographers and videographers. For this week's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we have edited together a sampling of our conversations with the following manufacturers: Nikon, Pentax/Ricoh, Westcott, Sony, Sigma, Luxli, Canon LG, TogTees, Godox, Leica, and Adobe. It's a long one, but we have blended a bit of elucidation with some humor and, hopefully, created an informative and enjoyable show. Join us, por favor. Guests: Lindsay Silverman, Nikon (01:16) Ken Curry, Ricoh (03:15) David Piazza, Westcott (08:16) Lavonne Hall, Adobe (16:35) Jason Mantell, Sony (22:20) Marc Farb, Sigma (36:24) Casey Krugman, Luxli (45:06) Rudy Winston, Canon (53:04) Gregg Lee, LG (01:00:54) Pano Kalogeropoulos, TogTees (01:10:14) Stephen Gomez, Godox (01:18:32) John Kreidler, Leica (01:25:49) Top Shot © Lindsay Adler DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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