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580 Views
Posted 07/14/11
This kit for the Zoom H4n includes a suspension mount to reduce handling noise and a windshield to reduce wind noise.
2328 Views
Posted 09/12/11
This next version of the original H2 features 5 microphones capsules allowing for multiple recording patterns including Mid-Side recording.
2113 Views
Posted 11/13/11
The R-26 offers 3 stereo channels, 2 sets of built in stereo mics, XLR/TRS inputs, a touch screen, and more.
19847 Views
Posted 05/20/14
Zoom sent shock waves through the pro audio world last year with the introduction of its flagship H6 recorder and its breakthrough modular microphone system. Although still very young, the H6 has already become an industry standard and a go-to piece for professional and enthusiast videographers, journalists, engineers, and musicians alike. Now, just a year later, Zoom brings yet another creation to the table in the form of the new H5 Handy Recorder —a smaller, yet more affordable little brother to the mighty H6, which keeps many of its key features, including its trademark interchangeable mic system. I was fortunate enough to get a chance to spend some time with the H5 to get a sense of its capabilities and make some recordings of my own. The H5 ships with the XYH-5, a stereo X/Y microphone module that's similar to the H6's standard XYH-6 mic, but with smaller matched condenser capsules and a fixed 90-degree X/Y angle. Like all of the modules, the XYH-5 has its own gain knob for setting the input level, but it also features an integrated rubberized shockmount that employs rugged external wires to help minimize vibration and handling noise. This feature will certainly come in handy for run-and-gun ENG applications, where any extra measure to combat hand, boom, and camera-borne noise is always appreciated. Another intriguing aspect of the XYH-5 is its ability to handle an impressive 140dB SPL, which is more than any other Handy Recorder mic. This means that you’ll be able to get closer to loud sound sources and rest assured that your audio will be recorded cleanly. This is great for recording concerts, foley, sporting events, and more. Additionally, the module has a 1/8" mic/line-in jack on its side, capable of supplying 2.5 volts of plug-in power to small condenser mics that require it. Now, the XYH-5 is great, but the fun doesn't stop there. One of the things that excited me the most about the H5 is that it's compatible with all of the H6's microphone modules, including the XYH-6 X/Y mic mentioned above, the MSH-6 mid-side stereo mic, the SGH-6 shotgun mic, and the EXH-6 dual XLR/TRS combo input module. I made some test recordings with the H5 using the included XYH-5, and the optional SGH-6 shotgun module, which I'll tell you more about in a minute. Capable of recording up to four tracks simultaneously, the H5 features two XLR/TRS combo inputs for connecting your own mics, in addition to the stereo module. These inputs use the same mic preamps as the H6, have switchable-20dB pads, and have the usual circular knobs to control the input gain. However, the H5 features a protective "roll-bar" that covers the knobs to prevent accidental movement of gain controls in the field. I thought this was a nice touch considering how well suited the unit is for handheld use, due to its small size (as opposed to always being used with protective carry case). On the monitoring side, the H5 features an 1/8" headphone output, plus there's a line out for making a backup or sync-guide recording directly to your camera. The headphone and line out jacks both have independent volume controls, as well. The recorder has the same tough rubberized plastic build we're used to, but is still very light, weighing only 0.7 pounds with the XYH-5 attached and two AA batteries installed. The H5 is capable of more than 15 hours of continuous recording using alkaline batteries, and an optional AC adapter is available separately to power the H5 without batteries. While the H5 doesn't have the flashy, casino-like, full-color display of the H6, it does have a nice, large backlit LCD screen that is easy to look at, and certainly serves its purpose. It was easy on the eyes while reading level meters and navigating through menus; everything looked very clear and readable. The transport controls are as they should be, including dedicated buttons for Stop, Play/Pause, Record, Rewind, and Forward, as well as record arm buttons for each of the four inputs. The arm buttons also serve as track mutes during playback. On the right side of the unit, you'll find the obligatory 2-way joystick selector and menu button that allows you to navigate the H5's folder-driven interface. The H5 puts a plethora of control at our fingertips, giving us channel independent compression and limiting on each track, as well as low-cut filtering. There are three compressor settings and three limiter settings for various applications, as well as ten different low-cut settings between 80 and 237Hz. There are some useful advanced features that are worth mentioning, including the Pro Tools-esque pre-record function that keeps the H5 continuously recording in the background, keeping a two-second buffer whenever you have a track armed. This is useful in the event that you're late to the punch (no pun intended) in hitting the record button, so you won't miss the first word of that interview, or the first note of that guitar take. There is also a convenient back-up record option that can be engaged on the L/R tracks to create a duplicate version of your main recording, only 12db lower than your input level settings. This is a nice failsafe that will give you some options if your main recording clips by accident. Just under the joystick and menu button lives the SD card slot, which takes SD or SDHC cards up to 32GB, and a 2GB card is included in the box. Audio can be recorded to either BWF-compliant WAV or MP3 formats in a variety of resolutions. For WAV files, the H5 supports quality up to 24-bit/96kHz for stereo recording, and up to 24-bit/48kHz in four track mode. The MP3 format can only be used when recording in stereo mode, and various options between 48 to 320kbps quality are available. The USB port on the left side of the unit makes it easy to transfer recorded files to your computer, and it also lets you use the H5 as an audio interface with either your computer or an iPad. In preparation for my test recording (an indoor interview of my poor wife), I set my bit-depth and sample rate to 24-bit/48kHz and connected the included XYH-5 stereo X/Y module to the H5, which locked into the top of the unit easily with a gratifying snap. I positioned my subject (wife) about five feet in front of me and the H5, so that the air conditioning unit in our apartment was to her right, about twelve feet away. I hit the Record button, and asked her to tell me about her day. The first thing I noticed in my headphones (other than that her job is way less fun than mine) was that the stereo image was tight and focused, reproducing her voice loud and clear in the center, while still giving me a sense of the acoustic space at the same time. I could hear the AC unit mostly in my left channel, but it was definitely lower in volume and more subdued in the stereo field. Next, I popped on the optional SGH-6 shotgun module and immediately noticed the highly directional quality of the mic, and the excellent rejection from the sides. Now my wife's voice sounded extremely clear and present, as long as I kept the mic pointed directly at her. The air conditioner, on the other hand, was now dramatically lower in volume and, with the low cut kicked in at 150Hz, it was even less noticeable.  After the interview, I was conveniently able to play back the recording so that my wife and I could both hear it by using the H5's built-in speaker, located on the back of the unit. Also located on the back, there's a 1/4"-20 thread for tripod mounting, or to connect directly to a DSLR or camcorder with the use of an optional hot-shoe mount. Last but, not least, in addition to the XYH-5 capsule, the H5 package includes a foam windscreen, a USB cable, a 2GB SD card, two AA batteries, a download for Wavelab LE for PC or Mac (Windows and OS X), and a carry case for safe storage and transport. If Zoom’s goal for the H5 was to take the most essential pieces of the H6 and pack them into a smaller, more portable device (and I have an inkling it was), I’d have to say they’ve succeeded with flying colors. I’d be curious and excited to see where Zoom takes the Handy Recorder line from here. RECORDING MEDIA   SD card   16MB to 2GB SDHC card   4GB to 32GB     INPUTS L/R [XYH-5 X/Y mic]   Mic type Directional Sensitivity-45 dB, 1 kHz at 1 Pa Input gain-∞ to 52 dB                                    Maximum sound pressure input 140 dB SPL     MIC/LINE IN    Connector  1/8" stereo mini jack Input gain- ∞ to 52 dB Input impedance  2 k Ω or more Plug-in power  2.5V supported Backup recording-12 dB lower than set L/R input gain     INPUTS 1/2   Connectors  XLR / TRS combo jacks (XLR: Pin 2 hot / TRS: Tip hot) Input gain (PAD OFF)-∞ to 55.0 dB  B11 Input gain (PAD ON)-∞ to 35.0 dB Input impedance 1.8 k Ω or more Maximum allowable input level +22 dBu (PAD ON) Phantom power +12V /+24V /+48V (can be turned On/Off independently for Inputs 1/2) Equivalent Input Noise (EIN)  -120 dBu or less      LINE OUT     Connector  1/8" (3.5mm) stereo mini jack Rated output level -10 dBm  Output load impedance 10k Ω or more     PHONE OUT   Connector  1/8" (3.5mm) stereo mini jack  Output Level  20 W +20 W into 32 Ω load Built-in speaker 400 mw @ 8 Ω, mono  Recording Formats [STEREO MODE] WAV (BWF-compliant) Sampling frequency  44.1/48/96 kHz Bit rate  16/24-bit (Stereo) Maximum simultaneous recording tracks 2     MP3    Sampling frequency 44.1 kHz Bit rate  48/56/64/80/96/112/32/160/192/224/256/320 kbps      WAV (BWF-compliant)   Sampling frequency  44.1/48 kHz Bit rate  16/24-bit (Mono/Stereo) Maximum simultaneous recording tracks  6 (L/R + INPUT 1/2 + L/R backup)     DISPLAY Backlit LCD (128 x 64 pixels)     USB [Mass Storage Class operation]   Class USB 2.0 High Speed      USB [Audio Interface operation: Multitrack mode]   Class USB 2.0 High Speed Sampling frequency  44.1/48 kHz  Bit rate  16/24-bit   Inputs / Outputs  4/2     AUDIO INTERFACE OPERATION [Stereo mode]   Class USB 2.0 Full Speed Sampling frequency  44.1/48 kHz  Bit rate 16-bit  Inputs / Outputs  2/2 USB bus-powered operation: yes iPad operation yes, stereo mode only     POWER REQUIREMENTS   Battery AA size (LR6) battery x 2 AC adapter  AD-17 (DC5V/1A/USB-type) (optional) USB USB bus power Battery life (with alkaline battery, continuous recording): Over 15 hours     DIMENSIONS   H5 2.3 x 5.3 x 1.7" (66.8 x 135.2 x 42.1mm) XYH-5 X/Y mic 2.6 x 2.4 x 1.6" (65.5 x  62.2 x 41mm)     WEIGHT   H5: 6.2 oz (176.0 g) XYH-5 X/Y mic: 3.3 oz (94.0 g)
6511 Views
Posted 06/06/14
In the following video, Rob Rives gets his hands on the Sony PCM-D100 High Resolution Audio Portable Recorder and demonstrates the sound quality it is capable of capturing with its built-in stereo microphones. Rives explores the functions and features of the PCM-D100, including its multiple digital audio format recording capability, and 24-bit/192kHz PCM and 2.8MHz DSD. The video showcases the way the recorder sounds when capturing acoustic guitar, as well as an outdoor scene. Rives also talks about its 32GB of internal storage and its support of external SD cards for expanded memory. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at B&H.com.
2878 Views
Posted 10/02/14
In this video, our resident audio expert, Rob Rives, shows us the new Zoom iQ6 stereo microphone, which turns your iOS device with Lightning connector into a fully functional field recorder. Great for capturing the sounds of concerts, interviews, meetings, lectures and more, the iQ6 records high-quality audio at up to 16-bit/48kHz resolution. The microphone uses the same two unidirectional condenser mics found in the popular H4n recorder, allowing your recordings to cover a wide area, while still capturing sound sources in the center with clarity and definition. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at B&H.com.
3422 Views
Posted 12/18/14
While we generally recommend getting closer to the subject and using a dual-system solution to avoid recording the camera's noisy preamps, in many one-shooter, run-and-gun situations, that's not always possible. This video is designed to give you an idea of what some of these microphones sound like in such situations. We begin by listening to the poor audio recorded from the built-in mic on a DSLR, followed by examples of how six camera-mountable microphones sound, individually. The featured microphones include: Polsen SCL-1075, RØDE VideoMic Go, sE Electronics ProMic Laser, Sennheiser MKE 400, Shure VP83, and the Senal SCS-98. 
1433 Views
Posted 01/07/15
In the following video, join B&H’s own Rob Rives as he examines the ProCast SST USB Mic & Audio Interface from MikTek. In the video, Rives examines some of the uses to which you can put this mic, including podcasting and home studio applications, and he reviews its build, as well as what kind of sound quality you can expect from this all-in-one unit. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.
6277 Views
Posted 04/01/15
In this video, our in-house audio expert, Rob Rives, demonstrates two condenser shotgun microphones from RØDE: the NTG4 and NTG4+. Featuring a supercardioid polar pattern and the ability to withstand up to 135 dB SPL, these mics offer an ideal solution for ENG, filmmaking, field recording, sound design, and broadcast applications. We hope you enjoy the video, and invite you to view the wide selection of other instructional and informative videos at BandH.com.
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