Podcast: Night Photography- Exploring the Creative Possibilities

In less than an hour, this podcast will teach you everything you need to know about night photography. Seriously. While our show is not a tutorial, the conversation is so broad and so deep; it touches upon every aspect of the craft. Guests Gabriel Biderman and Todd Vorenkamp blanket this subject with an engaging and humorous tone—from the psychological predisposition common to night shooters and the science of rods and cones to cameras, gear, apps and a recipe for creating images of star trails. This is truly an episode for all levels of shutterbugs seeking to explore or master image making at night. Well done guys!

Guests: Gabriel Biderman and Todd Vorenkamp

To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on iTunesStitcher; SoundCloud; or via RSS.

Thank you for joining our journey into night photography! For more Visualizing the Night content, please click here: Visualizing The Night and share your enthusiasm for the art below in the comments section or reach out to us on social media using #visualizethenight. Thanks for reading!

 
 
 

Photos by Todd Vorenkamp www.trvphoto.com
 

 Photos by Gabriel Biderman www.ruinism.com

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Host: Allan Weitz
Senior Creative Producer: John Harris
Producer: Jason Tables
Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves

1 Comments

The local photography club hosted a local astrophotographer and he presented three different methods of astrophotography: cheap, mid-range, and expensive. I got inspired from his presentation and used my A-1, 28mm f2.8 and TMAX 100 to photograph the Big Dipper. Later, I got a photo of Venus, Jupiter, Aldebaran.

Here's a photo of the International Space Station flying over me. This was taken with Kodak T-Max 100 film on a Canon A-1 using a 80-205 f4.5 zoom lens at 205. (tripod mounted, self-timer)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ralphhightower/7097679125/in/album-72157629498904278/

To see where the Space Station flys overhead, go to http://spotthestation.nasa.gov/ and plug in your location. If you can see stars, then you can see the Space Station.

Northern Lights:
That's on my bucket list to photograph.

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